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From: Henry Clay Frick  Next Image
Pascal-Adolphe-Jean Dagnan-Bouveret (1852-1929), Consolatrix Afflictorum, 1899. Reserved in 1898, Oil on canvas, 88 x 77 in. (223.5 x 195.6 cm). Frick Art and Historical Center.

Christ at Emmaus and Consolatrix Afflictorum, arguably among the most personally revealing paintings in Fricks collection, are by the French artist Pascal-Adolphe-Jean Dagnan-Bouveret, a photographer and artist once of the realist school and later a symbolist. Frick and Adelaide knew Dagnan, who was a small man, not more than five foot one or two, with dark hair, a dark beard, and deep-set, intense eyes. Regarded by his contemporaries as "a man who comes to feel instinctively the thoughts in the mind of another person with whom he is in intimate relationship, (and) arrives at a sympathetic knowledge of what is inside," Dagnan had an ability to express a persons inner soul and psychology. Perhaps this was the quality that most endeared him to Frick and Adelaide, for his contemporaries noted he "radiated sympathy which overflowed." Moreover, Dagnan-Bouveret was perfect for Frick, his aesthetic an ideal complement to Fricks emotional state and collecting pattern. As Gabriel Weisberg writes, this artist exhibited a "curious blending of the real with the unreal."


Pascal-Adolphe-Jean Dagnan-Bouveret (1852-1929), Consolatrix Afflictorum, 1899. Reserved in 1898, Oil on canvas, 88 x 77 in. (223.5 x 195.6 cm). Frick Art and Historical Center.Christ at Emmaus and Consolatrix Afflictorum, arguably among the most personally revealing paintings in Fricks collection, are by the French artist Pascal-Adolphe-Jean Dagnan-Bouveret, a photographer and artist once of the realist school and later a symbolist. Frick and Adelaide knew Dagnan, who was a small man, not more than five foot one or two, with dark hair, a dark beard, and deep-set, intense eyes. Regarded by his contemporaries as