Abbeville Press, publisher of fine art and illustrated books
From: George Segal  Next Image
Woman Shaving Her Leg, 1963. Plaster, metal, porcelain, and Masonite, 63 x 65 x 30 in. Mrs. Robert B. Mayer. On long-term loan to the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago.

In Woman Shaving Her Leg pose and space illustrate how Segal developed variations on the theme of the nude model. He uses body language to communicate form and meaning forcefully. Unlike the placement of the model in The Artists Studio, the stance of this woman is less self-conscious because it is integral to the task at hand. Although the gesture of her arms is significant, it is her whole body--the way her back is bent, for example--that carries the weight of the sculpture. Woman Shaving Her Leg, which incorporates a re-creation of the artists own tub-shower, has a frontal viewpoint. A subtle inflection governs this space; it could be simply pictorial, but instead it has an unexpected three-dimensional presence.


Woman Shaving Her Leg, 1963. Plaster, metal, porcelain, and Masonite, 63 x 65 x 30 in. Mrs. Robert B. Mayer. On long-term loan to the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago.In Woman Shaving Her Leg pose and space illustrate how Segal developed variations on the theme of the nude model. He uses body language to communicate form and meaning forcefully. Unlike the placement of the model in The Artists Studio, the stance of this woman is less self-conscious because it is integral to the task at hand. Although the gesture of her arms is significant, it is her whole body--the way her back is bent, for example--that carries the weight of the sculpture. Woman Shaving Her Leg, which incorporates a re-creation of the artists own tub-shower, has a frontal viewpoint. A subtle inflection governs this space; it could be simply pictorial, but instead it has an unexpected three-dimensional presence.