Peter Turnley

Peter Turnley

Peter Turnley is a contract photographer for Newsweek, where his coverage of the Gulf War, South Africa, Bosnia, Chechnya, and Kosovo has won numerous honors.

Parisians

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Paris and Parisians as seen through the affectionate lens of an award-winning American photojournalist.

As his loving but crisply unsentimental images make evident, Peter Turnley is a clear-eyed descendant of such master French photographers as Brassai, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Robert Doisneau, and Edouard Boubat; the latter two, in fact, have written brief tributes to him that serve as forewords to this book. That Turnley's work has been inspired by these earlier influences comes as no surprise, for as a young photographer he worked as Doisneau's assistant, and he subsequently became a close friend of Boubat, meeting him "at least once a week for an afternoon glass of rouge and warm conversation."

Yet Turnley's work is uniquely his own, rooted in his 25-year affair of the heart with the most beautiful city in the world. A longtime resident of the city, he invites us to share an intimate Paris that outsiders rarely see, giving us seductive glimpses of Paris life as lived on the street, in the Metro, and at countless neighborhood cafes.

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In Times of War and Peace

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As photojournalists since the early 1980s, the Turnleys have covered most of the great conflicts of the past fifteen years, and have been published in the best-known newspapers and magazines. Very often, one of their photographs becomes the iconic representation of the event. This is a result of their spending extended periods in the regions they cover, getting to know the people and the way of life.

During the three years David lived in South Africa, he showed apartheid as the prevailing system, its subsequent destruction, and the first elections of the new democratic state. Peter has pursued his interest in documenting the world's fourteen million refugees, and also photographed the fall of Communism in Russia and Eastern Europe. Together they photographed student dissidents in the months leading up to the Tiananmen Square massacre; their photographs of the massacre itself are among their most recognizable. Shining through all the photographs is the strength of individual character and hope against powerful social and political conflict.

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