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Ancient Trees

Portraits of Time

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Mesmerizing black-and-white photographs of the world’s most majestic ancient trees.

Holiday Gift Guide Selection -- San Francisco Chronicle

Beth Moon’s fourteen-year quest to photograph ancient trees has taken her across the United States, Europe, Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. Some of her subjects grow in isolation, on remote mountainsides, private estates, or nature preserves; others maintain a proud, though often precarious, existence in the midst of civilization. All, however, share a mysterious beauty perfected by age and the power to connect us to a sense of time and nature much greater than ourselves. It is this beauty, and this power, that Moon captures in her remarkable photographs.

This handsome volume presents sixty of Moon’s finest tree portraits as full-page duotone plates. The pictured trees include the tangled, hollow-trunked yews—some more than a thousand years old—that grow in English churchyards; the baobabs of Madagascar, called “upside-down trees” because of the curious disproportion of their giant trunks and modest branches; and the fantastical dragon’s-blood trees, red-sapped and umbrella-shaped, that grow only on the island of Socotra, off the Horn of Africa.

Moon’s narrative captions describe the natural and cultural history of each individual tree, while Todd Forrest, vice president for horticulture and living collections at the New York Botanical Garden, provides a concise introduction to the biology and preservation of ancient trees. An essay by the critic Steven Brown defines Moon’s unique place in a tradition of tree photography extending from William Henry Fox Talbot to Sally Mann, and explores the challenges and potential of the tree as a subject for art. 

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The Grand Cascapedia River Volume 1

A History

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Volume One of a magnificent two-volume history of the legendary salmon river, replete with tales of remarkable fish—and remarkable personalities

Originating in two rocky torrents in the Shick-Shock Mountains, the Grand Cascapedia River cuts across the forested wilderness of Quebec’s Gaspé Peninsula and empties into Chaleur Bay. Just as exceptional as the river’s natural beauty are the giant salmon that return there each summer to spawn. Known to the local Micmac Indians from time immemorial, these outsize fish have attracted wealthy and well-connected sportsmen—including captains of industry and U.S. presidents—since the mid-nineteenth century. Now, in these exhaustively researched and superbly written volumes, veteran angler Hoagy B. Carmichael reveals the eventful history of this most exclusive salmon river.

The first volume of The Grand Cascapedia River recounts the discovery of the river’s salmon by adventurous outdoorsmen in the 1840s; the assignment of fishing rights on the river to successive Governors General of Canada, as a curious perk of office; and—in a fascinating encounter between the Gilded Age and the northern wilds—the subsequent purchase of those rights by a small group of American millionaires, the “Old Club.”

The second volume begins with the dissolution of the Old Club in the depths of the Great Depression and traces the development of the private camps, each with its own character and lore, that are found along the river today. It also explores the management of the river’s natural resources and the present-day division of fishing rights between the camps, the Micmacs, and the public.

Both volumes are illustrated with hundreds of rare archival photographs, as well as original maps and drawings. The Grand Cascapedia River represents an important contribution not only to the annals of sport, but also to social history and wildlife conservation and management.

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The Grand Cascapedia River Volume 2

A History

By

Volume Two of a magnificent two-volume history of the legendary salmon river, replete with tales of remarkable fish—and remarkable personalities

Originating in two rocky torrents in the Shick-Shock Mountains, the Grand Cascapedia River cuts across the forested wilderness of Quebec’s Gaspé Peninsula and empties into Chaleur Bay. Just as exceptional as the river’s natural beauty are the giant salmon that return there each summer to spawn. Known to the local Micmac Indians from time immemorial, these outsize fish have attracted wealthy and well-connected sportsmen—including captains of industry and U.S. presidents—since the mid-nineteenth century. Now, in these exhaustively researched and superbly written volumes, veteran angler Hoagy B. Carmichael reveals the eventful history of this most exclusive salmon river.

The first volume of The Grand Cascapedia River recounts the discovery of the river’s salmon by adventurous outdoorsmen in the 1840s; the assignment of fishing rights on the river to successive Governors General of Canada, as a curious perk of office; and—in a fascinating encounter between the Gilded Age and the northern wilds—the subsequent purchase of those rights by a small group of American millionaires, the “Old Club.”

The second volume begins with the dissolution of the Old Club in the depths of the Great Depression and traces the development of the private camps, each with its own character and lore, that are found along the river today. It also explores the management of the river’s natural resources and the present-day division of fishing rights between the camps, the Micmacs, and the public.

Both volumes are illustrated with hundreds of rare archival photographs, as well as original maps and drawings. The Grand Cascapedia River represents an important contribution not only to the annals of sport, but also to social history and wildlife conservation and management.

Read more