Art and Design: American Art

Norman Rockwell's A Day in the Life of a Boy

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A day in the life of an American boy, illustrated with Norman Rockwell's iconic illustrations of life

A boy wakes up beside his beloved pet mutt for just another ordinary school day, but some surprises lie ahead! Here is one of Norman Rockwell’s most popular works, paired with a rhyming text that’s perfect for reading aloud or sharing with a grown-up. In classic Rockwell fashion, the almost two dozen pictures will elicit wry smiles of recognition, from young and old, at childhood’s everyday pleasures. At the back of the book is a short biography of Rockwell, as well as a note by Chuck Marsh, who, as a young boy more than sixty-five years ago, posed for the unforgettable series of pictures.

Norman Rockwell is America’s best-known, best-loved illustrator. While still in his teens, he was hired as art director of Boy's Life, the official publication of the Boy Scouts of America. Eventually he produced work for such magazines as Life, Look, and The Saturday Evening Post, for which he eventually produced 322 covers. In 1977, the artist received the nation’s highest civilian honor, the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Will Lach has written many children’s books about art, music, and natural history. He lives in Brooklyn with his family.

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Norman Rockwell's A Day in the Life of a Girl

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A day in the life of an American girl, illustrated with Normal Rockwell's iconic images of life.

A girl wakes up and tidies her braids before just another ordinary summer day, but some surprises lie ahead! Here is one of Norman Rockwell’s most popular works, paired with a rhyming text that’s perfect for reading aloud or sharing with a grown-up. In classic Rockwell fashion, the almost two dozen pictures will elicit wry smiles of recognition, from young and old, at childhood’s everyday pleasures. At the back of the book is a short biography of Rockwell, as well as a note by Mary Whalen Leonard, who, as a young girl more than sixty-five years ago, posed for the charming series of pictures

Norman Rockwell is America’s best-known, best-loved illustrator. While still in his teens, he was hired as art director of Boy's Life, the official publication of the Boy Scouts of America. Eventually he produced work for such magazines as Life, Look, and The Saturday Evening Post, for which he eventually produced 322 covers. In 1977, the artist received the nation’s highest civilian honor, the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Will Lach has written many children’s books about art, music, and natural history. He lives in Brooklyn with his family.

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Currier & Ives’ America

From a Young Nation to a Great Power

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The best-selling collection of Currier & Ives Americana, now available at an unbeatable price

In the 1800s—long before the days of photojournalism and cable news—vibrant, contemporary depictions of news events, portraits of prominent political and social figures, and scenic views of the American wilderness were circulated throughout the growing nation. From the beginning of the exciting century that saw a small nation expand into a mighty world power, the famous lithographic firm of Nathaniel Currier and James Merritt Ives produced over 7,000 prints, capturing scenes of American life in vivid detail.

Currier & Ives prints were each colored individually, by hand, and collectors have prized their skilled craftsmanship and keen sense of composition for generations. This timeless collection, complete with more than three hundred illustrations in full color and a masterful text by historian Walton Rawls, captures a beloved piece of Americana. With festive holiday scenes, watershed historical moments, and idyllic depictions of the American countryside, this book will hold perennial appeal for lovers of history, art, and a classic take on the American experience.

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Norman Rockwell

332 Magazine Covers

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A magnificent new printing of this classic album of Norman Rockwell’s best-loved works with full-color captions.

There are few more satisfying sights on a city street than a well-stocked newsstand, hung with a hundred or more magazines and periodicals, each competing for the attention of the potential customer. The American magazine cover enjoyed a Golden Age during the period that opened with the high-speed color press, and ended when subscription sales grew to paramount importance. Dozens of gifted artists made their reputations in this field. None of them, however, achieved the immense and sustained popular success enjoyed by Norman Rockwell.

Although technically he was an academic painter, he had the eye of a photographer and, as he became a mature artist, he used this eye to give us a picture of America that was familiar—astonishingly so—and at the same time unique. The picture seemed familiar because it was everyone’s dream of America; it was unique because only Rockwell managed to bring it to life with such authority. Rockwell held up a friendly mirror to the society he lived in, and Americans have looked into this glass and seen themselves as warm, decent, hard-working citizens of a country bountiful enough to accommodate their boundless optimism.

Rockwell best expressed this vision of America in his justly famous cover illustrations for the Saturday Evening Post, painted between 1916 and 1963. All of his Post covers are reproduced in splendid full color in this oversized volume, with commentaries by Christopher Finch, the noted writer on art and popular culture.

In this latest printing of332 Magazine Covers, the thumbnail images accompanying Finch’s descriptive captions are printed in full color for the convenience of the reader, and the typography has been refreshed.

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The Carving of Mount Rushmore

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The first book to tell the complete story of Rushmore.

Now as an e-book, The Carving of Mount Rushmore tells the complete story of the largest and certainly the most spectacular sculpture in existence. More than 60 black-and-white photographs offer unique views of this gargantuan effort, and author Rex Alan Smith—a man born and raised within sight of Rushmore—recounts with the sensitivity of a native son the ongoing struggles of sculptor Gutzon Borglum and his workers.

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Egyptian Wall Painting

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A fascinating study of ancient Egyptian wall art, featuring full-page illustrations on matte paper specially designed to re-create the texture of the paintings themselves.

Ancient Egyptian civilization developed its own highly individual manner of expressing visible and invisible worlds—earth and the domain of the gods—through distinctive “languages.” These languages included both two-dimensional portrayals (paintings and painted reliefs) and three-dimensional figures—forms that each must be skillfully deciphered in order to grasp its overt and covert meanings.

Egyptian Wall Painting focuses on two-dimensional depictions in ancient Egypt, examining them as part of an elaborate code that was designed to maintain the Maat—or Cosmic Order, Truth-Justice, and Universal Harmony—and that figured intimately in Egyptian lives and beliefs. The text conducts this examination through two different lenses: that of Western rational analysis, with its emphasis on methods and techniques, and that of ancient Egyptian spirituality, which these complex works have handed down to our own time.

Accordingly, the first section of the book analyzes the technology, techniques, history, and cultural context of Egyptian art, while the second compares selected monumental works across different periods and places, detailing their artistic and spiritual significance. Handsomely illustrated with 350 color plates, including numerous full-page details printed on a special matte paper designed to simulate the feel of the stuccoed limestone on which the original images were painted, Egyptian Wall Painting illuminates an art, language, and culture of extraordinary richness.

The volume is also available in a slipcased version for those seeking an especially luxurious presentation for home or library. As the definitive treatment of its subject, Egyptian Wall Painting is sure to appeal to art historians, Egyptologists, linguists, and connoisseurs interested in one of history’s most complex and influential civilizations.

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The North American Indian Portfolios

From the Library of Congress

This miniature folio is based on the well-known frontier artwork by Bodmer, Catlin, and McKenney & Hall.

Based on the renowned frontier artwork of George Catlin’s North American Indian Portfolio, McKenney and Hall’s History of the Indian Tribes of North America, and Prince Maximilian’s Travels in the Interior of North America between 1832 and 1834, these historic collections of prints and paintings were the first to preserve images of Native Americans before their culture was affected by the white man. Fulfilling one of the Library of Congress’ central missions—to document the printed, visual, and written history of this country—the images in this volume constitute part of the archive of the American memory.

Native Americans found the world’s eyes upon them in the nineteenth century. Artists like George Catlin, Charles Bird King, and Karl Bodmer trekked to the West to paint images for those unable to make the journey and created some of the most important sociological, historical, and ethnological studies of American Indians. George Catlin, for example, was allowed to observe many of the ceremonies and games in the Indian villages which enabled him to provide a remarkably detailed picture of the tribe’s religious and social life. He wrote, “The history and customs of such a people, preserved by pictorial illustration, are themes worthy of the lifetime of one man.” This extraordinary miniature folio will appeal to anyone with an interest in American art, art history, or Native American history.

The miniature folio, published in associateion with The Library of Congress, features an introduction written by James Gilreath, the former American History Specialist for the Librarys Rare Book and Special Collections.

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Fine Art of the West

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This landmark study delves into the traditional arts and crafts of the wild American West and their lasting effects on contemporary design.

Visually breathtaking, Fine Art of the West brings together the most artistically significant objects created by master craftsmen from the mid-nineteenth century to today. B. Byron Price, a leading expert of Western American art, explores the fascinating origins of these objects in the Old West, as the legacy of Spanish-American craftsmen and the workaday equipment of cowboys. The story continues as he traces their influence upon innovative designers employing them as a basis for a new, vigorous tradition in decorative art.

Working saddles and their offspring, the trophy, parade, and presentation saddles, are discussed in depth and appear in stunning full-page reproductions, complemented by a definitive selection of chaps, cuffs, gauntlets, and gun leather. Price also focuses on quirts and other objects that illustrate artistry with hide and hair, as well as fine metalwork, including buckles, bits, spurs, and jewelry. Hats and boots, both workaday and fancy, conclude the survey. Contemporary craftsmen who carry on these traditions today are represented alongside illustrations of their work. A glossary and bibliography complete this first comprehensive look at one of America's most fascinating forms of artistic expression.

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American Impressionism

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An expanded and revised edition of this elegant and definitive volume, which helped establish the ever-growing passion for American Impressionism.

With brilliant scholarship and a wealth of stunning illustrations, American Impressionism provides a vivid summary of the entire art movement, starting with its roots in earlier American art and its relationship to French Impressionsim. The first edition was quickly recognized as the most authoritative and penetrating account of the movement, which has continued to grow in poularity since the book's debut. For this new edition, which features 25 additional illustrations, Professor Gerdts has added a fascinating new chapter on Impressionist themes. The volume also includes a thoroughly updated bibliography.

American Impressionism tells how the movement progressed rom an avant-garde aesthetic assaulted by critics up to its years of triumph and how the movement developed in diverse ways throughou the country including regional Impressionism in the South, Midwest, and West. All of the master works are here, from Childe Hassam's sun-drenched gardens to John Twachtman's snow-silenced landscapes, from Edmund Tarbell's coolly elegant ladies in dim, luxurious interiors to Frederick Frieseke's sun-dappled nudes.

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Ray Ellis in Retrospect

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The first retrospective of the work of Ray Ellis, a celebrated American artist acclaimed for his paintings of Martha's Vineyard and the Lowcountry of Georgia and South Carolina.

With an insightful text by a noted American art specialist and vibrant, color-infused images, this dazzlingly beautiful book reveals the full breadth of Ray Ellis's remarkable career. While Ellis is often described as an Impressionist because of his loose brushwork, bright color, and interest in light and atmosphere, his work is naturalistic and closer to realism.

Equally talented in oils and watercolors, he interprets the many sights and locales he has seen. In addition to marine subjects and coastal landscapes for which he is best known, this volume also presents his finest still lifes and paintings of cityscapes and travels. The works span several decades from the early 1960s through his most recent paintings.

Ray Ellis In Retrospect: A Painter's Journey also includes an illustrated, autobiographical essay by Ray Ellis and a chronology. Now in his eighth decade, Ellis continues to be passionate about painting. Still studying and experimenting, his greatest pleasure is to begin his next work striving to “do the best painting” he has ever done.

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Shaker: Life, Art, and Architecture

Hands to Work, Hearts to God

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In this pioneering study, historian Scott T. Swank reveals the links between the daily life of the Shakers in their planned religious communities and their art and architecture.

As the Director of Canterbury Shaker Village, the author has had unlimited access to the Village's archives, resources, and grounds, examining papers and artifacts, exploring the 25 remaining buildings, and experiencing the seasons. He has literally been able to walk in the footpaths of the Canterbury Shakers, whose community remained prominent for 200 years. It is one of the oldest, most typical, and most completely preserved of all the Shaker villages, the only community with an intact first-generation meetinghouse and first dwelling house on their original sites. The result of the author's painstaking research and close observation is this perceptive book, filled with discoveries, presenting the full sweep of Shaker art and architecture in the context of a specific Shaker community in Canterbury, New Hampshire.

Two centuries ago, the Shakers established America's most successful communal societies. They lived in isolated, rural villages, pursuing work and worship in communities where religion, social behavior, and environmental design were constructed as a harmonious whole. These utopian communities were regulated by "gospel order" which assured their members that their disciplined lives were in harmony with God's will. In these spiritual havens, they endeavored to accomplish their founder's twin mandates, "Hands to work, hearts to God."Shaker designs have endured long after the communities that created them have passed from the American scene. Shaker style, encompassing all elements of art and architecture, has been greatly esteemed for its craftsmanship, sense of proportion, simplicity, and practicality. The author's well researched text, detailed captions, and excerpts from diaries and letters bring life to the legacy of Shaker objects as well as to the architecture. He also provides a time line, a bibliography, and notes.

Accompanying the text are 250 illustrations including 150 in color principally by Bill Finney, who has been photographing Canterbury for over twenty years. There are also historical pictures and maps and newly created plans and diagrams.This insightful book should especially interest collectors, historians, interior designers, and architects, giving readers a deeper understanding and appreciation of the Shakers' artistic legacy.

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California Impressionism

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Lavishly illustrated, meticulously researched, and gracefully written, this is the definitive study of California's distinctive style of Impressionism.

In recent years, the richly colored, exuberantly painted canvases by artists such as Franz Bischoff, Alson Clark, Joseph Raphael, Guy Rose, and William Wendt have attracted an expanding circle of admirers all across the country. In addition to the work of these established West Coast masters, many less-known California Impressionists are presented here, including John Frost, Evelyn McCormick, Bruce Nelson, and others whose work has not yet been widely discovered.

In his far-ranging introductory essay, Dr. Gerdts explores the context of California Impressionism, surveying the movement's sources abroad, the most influential exhibitions in America, and the critical responses to the art and the artists. He introduces the work of an almost entirely forgotten foursome—Helena Dunlap, Detlef Sammann, Ernest Browning Smith, and Jack Gage Stark—who were the first local painters to be identified as Impressionists in Los Angeles and who contributed to an important but long-overlooked moment in the city's cultural history.

Will South supplies an enlightening chronological narrative of the California Impressionists, starting with their often-ignored roots in the Hudson River school and other American realist art. Tracing the trajectory of their work from the innovations of the late 1800s to the style's final days in the 1920s and '30s, he offers vital new information and insight about their training and careers, as well as their ideas about art, nature, and the Golden State. Dr. South also provides detailed artists' biographies and an extensive bibliography.

At a time when interest in all aspects of regional Impressionism continues to flourish, California Impressionism commands the greatest interest of all. This book will be an invaluable resource and source of pleasure for the innumerable collectors, scholars, and art lovers who find this work—with its wind-swept coasts, majestic mountains, and poppy-strewn fields—irresistibly appealing.

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American Art of the Twentieth Century

Treasures of the Whitney Museum of American Art

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The Whitney Museum in New York is one of the country's premier showcases for 20th-century American art.

This survey of the Whitney's Permanent Collection presents a selection of remarkable works, in a variety of media, by the most notable American artists. Among the more than two hundred images are paintings by Edward Hopper, Georgia O'Keeffe, Frank Stella, Franz Kline, Andy Warhol, and Jasper Johns; sculpture by Alexander Calder, Claes Oldenburg, and David Smith; photographs by Robert Frank, Man Ray, Robert Mapplethorpe, and Diane Arbus; and drawings by Hopper, Philip Guston, and Jackson Pollock.

A handy companion to the Whitney's Permanent Collection, this Tiny Folio offers a century of masterpieces from a superlative institution.

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William Glackens

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The life and work of one of the most admired American Impressionists are fully detailed in the first major monograph on the artist.

William Glackens was one of the most influential American painters in the first decades of the twentieth century. From his beginnings as a witty magazine artist-illustrator in Philadelphia and New York to his participation in the forward-thinking group of artists dubbed The Eight, Glackens was a perceptive interpreter of his surroundings.

Glackens, one of the most versatile and popular artists of his time, assimilated the lighthearted modern French themes of spirited cafés and bustling parks and resorts in such canvases as Chez Mouquin (1905) and Sledding, Central Park (1912). An admirer of the more traditional figure painting of the Impressionist Renoir, his name also became closely linked to the modern artists who exhibited their works at the famous Armory Show of 1913, which Glackens helped organize.

This important study, the first major monograph on Glackens, includes an insightful essay by Dr. William Gerdts and a complete catalog, introduced by curator Jorge Santis, describing the incomparable holdings of the Glackens Collection of the Museum of Art, Fort Lauderdale, Florida. With a chronology, bibliography, and index, this profusely illustrated volume is sure to become the standard reference on Glackens for historians and collectors of twentieth-century art.

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Contemporary American Folk Art

A Collector's Guide

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For the new or seasoned collector, this groundbreaking guide reveals how to evaluate contemporary American folk art as well as where to see, buy it, and what to spend on it.

With the rising popularity of contemporary folk art, collectors have been asking, Who are the artists? Where are they located? Where can I see their art? How can I buy their work? And how much does it cost?This wonderfully illustrated guidebook offers answers to these questions and much more. The authors, passionate collectors of contemporary American folk art for more than two decades, have traveled widely throughout rural and urban America, searching out artists, collecting extraordinary pictures, sculptures, and objects, and gathering information. Their highly informative text, organized by region, features 181 biographies of both new and established artists and includes tips about how to evaluate the art. The book is illustrated with color photos of more than 155 works as well as forty-four black-and-white pictures of the artists. Of special value are the extensive listings of galleries and museums where the best folk art being created today may be viewed.

Supplementing the text are essays by Lee Kogan of the Museum of American Folk Art and by Nancy Druckman of Sotheby's. Regional maps, a bibliography, and a price guide round out this indispensable reference book.

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Norman Rockwell Postcard Book

These thirty heart-warming and whimsical postcards celebrate Norman Rockwell's unique vision of the American dream.

Norman Rockwell is often associated with the series of witty covers he executed for The Saturday Evening Post. But, in fact, he had a much wider impact as an artist and illustrator: story illustrations for the Ladies' Home Journal, covers for popular magazines such as Boy's Life, Literary Digest, and Life; journalistic interpretations of social themes and portraits of political figures for Look magazine; and advertisements for corporate giants like AT&T and Kellogg cereal.

The 30 images presented here highlight Norman Rockwell's entire artistic vision, capturing the spirit of America's most beloved pictorial storyteller.

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Masters of American Sculpture

The Figurative Tradition

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Commemorating the 100th anniversary of the National Sculpture Society, this important history traces America's rich heritage of figurative sculpture from the Columbian exposition of 1893 to the present.

Illustrated with outstanding examples of American figurative sculpture of the last century, this volume begins with an analysis of the influence of the Beaux-Arts tradition on the creation of the great public monuments of the young republic. With this background, the book moves on to survey important categories of sculpture chronologically.Equestrian monuments and countless tributes to war heroes are surveyed in one category. In another important grouping, author David Martin Reynolds surveys portrait sculpture. He also includes a section on medallic art, a category usually neglected in sculpture surveys.

In another innovation, Dr. Reynolds devotes a chapter to American Indians, both as widely favored subjects for sculpture and as sculptors themselves. Not neglecting genre, the author deals extensively with the large group of sculptors who concentrated on animals. Finally he surveys the figurative tradition in the twentieth century and speculates on future trends in sculpture.

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