Ancient Skies, Ancient Trees

By Beth Moon

Release Date
Format Hardcover 116 pages 11 x 11 inches Approximately 55 color prints
Category Photography
Collection
ISBN-13 978-0-78921-267-2 SKU 1042674

Photographer Beth Moon revisits the world’s oldest trees in the darkest places on earth, using color photography to capture vibrant nighttime skies

Throughout much of the world, night skies are growing increasingly brighter, but the force that protects the remaining naturally dark sky, unpolluted by artificial light, is the same that saves its ancient trees—isolation. Staking out some of the world’s last dark places, photographer Beth Moon uses a digital camera to reveal constellations, nebulae, and the Milky Way, in rich hues that are often too faint to be seen by the naked eye. As in her acclaimed first volume, Ancient Trees: Portraits of Time, these magnificent images encounter great arboreal specimens, including baobabs, olive trees, and redwoods, in such places as South Africa, England, and California.

In her artist’s statement, Beth Moon describes the experience of shooting at night in these remote places. An essay by Jana Grcevich, postdoctoral fellow of astrophysics at the American Museum of Natural History, provides the perspective of a scientist racing to study the stars in a world growing increasingly brighter. Clark Strand, the author of Waking Up to the Dark: Ancient Wisdom for a Sleepless Age, takes a different tack, illuminating the inherent spirituality of trees.

AWARDS

2016 Holiday gift guide selection  San Francisco Chronicle 

2016 Holiday gift guide selection  Entertainment Weekly

2016 Holiday gift guide selection  Chronogram Magazine 

2016 Holiday gift guide selection  Atlas Obscura 

2016 Holiday gift guide selection  Poughkeepsie Journal 

2016 Holiday gift guide selection  Palisade News 

 

PRAISE FOR ANCIENT SKIES, ANCIENT TREES

From quiver trees in the isolated deserts of Namibia to baobabs in the dry landscapes of Botswana, each portrait is a study against a night sky. Their solitary feeling reflects both their locations and their timeworn growth beneath the glow of the Milky Way. — Hyperallergic

The resulting images show awe-inspiring Tolkienian landscapes photographed in such sharp detail that when reproduced on the page they have the texture of oil paintings. ... More than an art book for photographers or those interested in nature, Moon's latest book will captivate all. — Starred Review, Publishers Weekly

Otherworldly is the best word to describe Beth Moon’s latest offering...Ancient Skies, Ancient Trees allows readers to see the world in a new light. — BookPage

[Opens] our eyes to the glowing universe beyond. — San Francisco Chronicle

An ode to trees — Pasatiempo, Santa Fe New Mexican

There's a haunting connection between trees and the night sky that brings a powerful charge to photographer Beth Moon's book Ancient Skies, Ancient Trees.  National Examiner

In delicately colored long-exposure images, old-growth trees frame skies that are bright with stars. From South Africa to California, Moon recorded baobabs, quiver trees, bristlecone pines, Joshua trees, sequoias and oaks, lit by the Milky Way and constellations in the Southern and Northern hemispheres. — Photo District News

Moon reveals a side of Earth that is majestic, awe-inspiring, and almost unbelievable ... Does this sort of raw, transcendent scene really exist? Yes. Moon considers ancient, undisturbed trees the way some trekkers see the Himalayas or astronauts see outer space: Visiting these areas is to witness firsthand a world that is prehistoric, almost pre-human.  SF Weekly

A vivid expression of the natural world's enduring beauty. — Atlas Obscura

It's easy to feel young when you're staring at 6,000-year-old trees set against the dreamy backdrop of billion-year-old starry skies. Maybe that's what Beth Moon was trying to do when she went on a globetrotting quest to capture the oldest and most awesome trees on earth. — Escapism 

In Moon's beautiful shots, the Milky Way spills in a brilliant ripple across velvety skies. — Entertainment Weekly

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