Release Date
Format Hardcover 220 pages 11 x 13 inches 200 illustrations, 122 in full color
ISBN-13 978-0-78920-531-5
Retailers Amazon

Illustrated with 200 splendid reproductions, this monograph challenges the conventional wisdom about Andrea del Sarto, the most important painter working in Florence when Raphael and Michelangelo were active in Rome.

By returning to original sources, Natali succeeds in introducing a new Andre del Sarto (1486-1530), one whose brilliant and moving pictures leap off the pages with startling freshness. Since the 16th century, Andrea has been pictured as a "timid soul," a view first proposed in Vasari's Lives and perpetuated without revision by later writers. According to this view, the artist was so shy and irresolute that he squandered his gift, living in near obscurity and refusing prosperity and worldly honors.

Not so, says Natali, who argues instead that Andrea chose a simple but culturally vibrant life in a circle of like-minded friends—intellectuals and common folk who practiced material austerity and humility. How, asks Natali, can we label as timid an artist who painted a fresco cycle in Florence's most prestigious sacred institution when he was barely twenty years old? How irresolute was the man who accepted an open-ended invitation from French king Francis I to join his court in an era when few artists left Florence; who—amid rigid orthodoxy and accusations of heresy—filled his sacred paintings with bold theological content; who headed teams of renowned artists in learned artistic debates and in the execution of major commissions? With such provocative insights, this volume is certain to stimulate and delight art historians and non-scholars alike.

You May Also Like