Art and Design: Architecture

Posh Portals

Elegant Entrances and Ingratiating Ingresses to Apartments for the Affluent in New York City

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An illustrated tour of the elegant entrances to New York City’s most celebrated apartment houses

This handsome, oversized book introduces us to the grandest entrances of New York City’s residential buildings. These posh portals come in an array of forms and styles, such as the porte cochere, with a passage to admit carriages or motor cars; the classic awning, originally meant to be retracted in good weather; and Neoclassical, Romanesque, and Gothic revivals. 

Architectural historian Andrew Alpern highlights approximately 140 entrances, from the nineteenth century to the present, including those of the Dakota, the first true luxury apartment house in New York; San Remo, one of Central Park West’s most impressive apartment houses; and the Ansonia, at one time the largest hotel in the world. Each entrance is accompanied by a description of its signal features and the history of the building that surrounds it. All are represented in splendid color photographs, and many by charming watercolor drawings.

These ornate entrances offer a glimpse into New York’s past, as well as its future―for today, once again, entryways have begun to feature heavily in the marketing of residential buildings. Posh Portals will be an inspiration for architects and a delight for city dwellers.

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Bali

Sustainable Visions

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Discover how visionary architects and designers are pioneering a new, environmentally sustainable style of tropical living

Justly famous for its artistic expressions, Balinese culture is also uniquely adapted to the natural conditions of this small volcanic island just a few degrees south of the equator. The subak system, maintained cooperatively for more than a millennium, channels fresh water from high in the mountains to the terraced rice fields below. And the vernacular architecture, made from renewable materials like wood and bamboo, is designed to accommodate the indoor-outdoor tropical lifestyle—and to withstand the extremes of tropical weather.

Today, even as Bali's ecosystem is challenged by a continued influx of foreign tourists, a handful of inspired creators are rediscovering the island's long tradition of environmental sustainability. This gorgeous and eye-opening volume introduces us to their most innovative projects on Bali and other islands, including luxurious private homes built from traditional and reclaimed materials; the Suarga Resort, which boasts the world's largest bamboo-shingled roof; and the Green School, an international primary and secondary school where students learn to be stewards of the earth.

Illustrated throughout with stunning new color photographs and animated by a deep ecological consciousness, Bali: Sustainable Visions is an essential book for everyone who cares about the future of architecture, design, and the natural environment.

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The Golden Lands

Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Myanmar, Thailand, and Vietnam

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A groundbreaking survey of the Buddhist architecture of Southeast Asia, abundantly illustrated with new color photography.

Over the course of its 2,500-year history, Buddhism has found expression in countless architectural forms, from the great monastic complexes of ancient India to the fortified dzongs of Bhutan, the rock-carved temple grottoes of China, the wooden shrines of Japan, and the colorful wats of Cambodia, Laos, and Thailand. Architecture of the Buddhist World, a projected six-volume series by the noted architect and scholar Vikram Lall, represents a new multidisciplinary approach to this fascinating subject, showing how Buddhist thought and ritual have interacted with local traditions across the Asian continent to produce masterpieces of religious architecture.

The first volume in the series, The Golden Lands, is devoted to Southeast Asia, home to many of the most spectacular Buddhist monuments. Following a general introduction to the early history of Buddhism and its most characteristic architectural forms (the stupa, the temple, and the monastery), Lall examines the Buddhist architecture of Myanmar, Vietnam, Indonesia, Cambodia, Thailand, and Laos in turn. For each country, he provides both a historical overview and case studies of noteworthy structures. Lall’s concise and accessible text is illustrated throughout with new color photography, as well as 3-D architectural models that make even the most complex structures easily comprehensible.

The monuments that Lall considers in The Golden Lands range from the modest Bupaya stupa, constructed in Bagan, Myanmar, in the third century CE, to the vast complex of Borobudur in Central Java, the world’s largest Buddhist monument. Lall’s achievement is to place them all within a single panorama of history, religion, and artistic innovation.

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Pre-Columbian Architecture in Mesoamerica

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An authoritative and magnificently illustrated survey of Mesoamerican architecture from pre-Olmec times to the Spanish conquest.

This important book, prepared by leading contemporary archaeologists working under the aegis of Mexico’s prestigious Instituto Nacional de Antropología y Historia, begins with an overview of the aesthetics, symbolism, and techniques of Mesoamerican architecture. The succeeding chapters survey the historical development of architecture in each of the region’s cultural areas in turn, describing the achievements of the Olmecs, the Maya, the Teotihuacanos, the Aztecs, and many other groups. The concluding chapter is devoted to the descriptions of architecture that have survived in Maya and Aztec texts; it includes a unique and valuable glossary of the relevant glyphs.

The main text of this handsome volume is illustrated with color photographs of the spectacular remains of pyramids, palaces, and plazas, while a scholarly appendix presents maps, plans, and drawings of the most important sites and structures.

With its authoritative essays and wealth of pictorial material, Pre-Columbian Architecture in Mesoamerica is destined to become a standard reference for the serious student and a source of intellectual delight for the curious amateur. There is no other survey of the entire Mesoamerican region that focuses exclusively on the architectural achievements of its native peoples.

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Homes of the Park Cities, Dallas

Great American Suburbs

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A beautiful and comprehensive chronicle of two of America’s earliest and most luxurious suburbs: Highland Park and University Park, Texas.

Dallas local Virginia McAlester, author of Random House’s A Field Guide to American Houses, the classic book on the subject, and Abbeville’s celebrated Great American Houses and Their Architectural Styles, teamed up with Prudence Mackintosh and Willis Cecil Winters to write Homes of the Park Cities, Dallas. This impressive and informative case study immerses readers into the architecture and culture, both past and present, of these classy neighborhoods.

Illustrated with over 280 specially commissioned photographs, in addition to over 75 maps, graphs, and archival images, this insightful work covers the history and development of Dallas’s suburbs, as well as the architects who designed them. Homes also features several appendices, providing notes on how to preserve early-twentieth century homes and a catalogue listing over 1,600 homes by address and architect. McAlester authored an additional appendix that illustrates the architectural styles found in The Park Cities, which run the gamut from Tudor and Colonial Revival to Minimal Traditional and Mid-Century Modern.

As grand as the houses it chronicles, Homes of the Park Cities, Dallas will fascinate architects, historians, suburbanites, and would-be suburbanites alike.

 

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The Great Country Houses of Hungary

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Hungary houses a superb selection of Europe's finest country homes that were built over the centuries by some of the nation's most distinguished families.

Baroque castles and rococo villas dot Hungary’s countryside and stand as testaments to the wealth and power of this region’s aristocracy. Lord Pratt reveals the histories and treasures of these structures, many of which were inaccessible to the West until this past decade. Setting his discussion of the houses and their patrons against the backdrop of Hungary’s history, Pratt illuminates the manner in which diverse political and cultural influences have molded the architecture of this country’s most illustrious homes. For instance, he recounts how the castle Sárvár evolved from a wooden, fourteenth-century fortress to a splendid piece of Renaissance architecture under the noble Nádasdy’s family guidance. In a new, final chapter, Pratt laments the demise of the great home Fót while praising the skillful restoration of Seregélyes.

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The Great Country Houses of The Czech Republic and Slovakia

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Lord Pratt tells the story of the country houses that crown the rolling hills of the Czech Republic and Slovakia, immersing us in the vanished world of these countries' aristocracies.

A comprehensive analysis of where politics, culture, and art merge, The Great Country Houses of the Czech Republic and Slovakia is a captivating read for anyone curious about the history and architecture of these two countries. Gerhard Trumler’s striking photographs allow readers entrance, for example, to the Liechtensteins’ twin chateaux of Valtice and Lednice in the Czech Republic. The lords of these castles established one of the greatest art collections in the world and played a major role in the diplomatic and military lives of the nation; they still remain as the ruling house of the Principality of Liechtenstein.

Pratt’s new chapter speaks of the difficulties of restoration and problems concerning modern-day ownership. Though many estates were lost or damaged during the World Wars, the houses as they stand today—some restored, some languishing in disrepair—present a rich cultural heritage of two fascinating countries.

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Andrea Palladio

The Architect in His Time (2nd Edition)

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A comprehensive handbook exploring the career of the architect who transformed the building design and construction of the Western world.

Andrea Palladio (1508–1580) is known as the architect who has guided Western design philosophy for half a millennium, creating forms that have been studied and reproduced from age to age and around the world. For architects and the public alike, his buildings have become enduring testaments to his architectural genius as creator of a timeless classicism. When Abbeville Press first published Andrea Palladio: The Architect in His Time in 1994, it was selected by Choice magazine as “Outstanding Academic Book 1994,” while The World of Interiors called it “undoubtedly one of the most important architectural books to be published for some time.” Now Abbeville is pleased to release the revised concise edition of this essential resource.

Featuring a newly updated bibliography, this handsome volume spans the entire career of Palladio, illuminating his work in the context of his historical era and his own extraordinary life. It invites us to view Palladio’s masterpieces through the lens of Paolo Marton, moving across the thresholds of myriad villas, churches, and public edifices to illustrate the elegant proportions, crisp lines, and integrated geometries that are the hallmarks of Palladio’s vision. From the immortal Villa Rotonda to the Venetian churches of the Redentore and San Giorgio Maggiore, from the city halls to the bridges, each masterpiece is described using plans, maps, and contemporary drawings and etchings along with brilliant photography.

Combining modern scholarship with intriguing narrative, Palladio will educate and enlighten, helping readers understand the passion, joy, and beauty of one of the world’s most fascinating ages of architecture.

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New Bar and Club Design

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A sophisticated, contemporary survey of fifty of the world’s newest and most stylish bars and clubs.

The sequel to the highly successful and critically praised book, Bar and Club Design, New Bar and Club Design is an elegant photographic journey through the latest international design trends in the bar and club industries, highlighting bars and clubs completed since 2001.

There has been a resurgence of cocktail culture and an explosion of the “style bar,” places that are professionally designed and serve high quality spirits, wine, and cocktails. Such bars have continued to open in cities such as New York, London, and Tokyo, but also in Beirut and Bangkok. Another strong trend in bar and club design, documented here, is a interest in creating lower budget designer bars that are as visually interesting and unusually designed as the big budget productions, such as Andy Wahloo in Paris and Loungelover in London. Likewise, club culture continues to thrive, albeit on a far smaller scale than the superclubs of the 1990s. Nightclubs have grown cozier, late night lounge bars have emerged to cater to the “grown-up clubber,” offering comfort and luxury rather than an empty shell in which to dance. The futuristic “superclubs” still being built now offer the very latest in technology and audiovisual entertainment.

This book explores the design zeitgeist of drinking and dancing culture worldwide. Divided by category into bars, restaurant bars, hotel bars, and clubs, each profile includes imaginative photographs, thoughtful descriptions, and architectural plans of the design. The innovative, sleek photographs allow the reader to enter into the ambience of each bar and experience its atmosphere. Sure to be an excellent guide for bar and club owners, architects and designers, as well as a sourcebook for new design inspirations, New Bar and Club Design will be appealing to travelers, night-lifers and design-lovers of every description.

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Wood Houses

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A superbly illustrated survey profiling noteworthy new homes from around the world, all constructed from the architect's latest cutting-edge material — wood.

A superbly illustrated survey profiling noteworthy new homes from around the world, all constructed from the architect’s latest cutting-edge material—wood.

Contemporary architects have long overlooked the great versatility of wood as a building material. Now, however, they have begun to adopt wood as the natural solution to a variety of design problems, and as a result, this environmentally sustainable material is becoming increasingly significant in today’s domestic architecture.

Wood Houses, by noted architecture journalist Ruth Slavid, displays the entire breadth of this important architectural movement by covering forty-six recently built homes. The featured houses range from Fernau and Hartman Architects’ Mann Residence in Sonoma County, a timber-frame house with a strikingly decentralized plan, to 24H Architecture’s Arjang House in Värmland, Sweden, a reindeer fur-lined, cedar-shingled lakeside retreat. Each house’s profile is illustrated with not only the architect’s own plans and elevations but also numerous full-color interior and exterior photographs that highlight the intrinsic beauty of wood.

Slavid explores the background of the present wood-house renaissance in an introduction that covers topics as wide-ranging as timber-frame construction, the use of wood in an urban setting, and fire prevention. She goes on to illuminate significant trends in the field of wooden home design, such as timber’s popularity as a construction material for vacation homes and the evolution of deliberately austere aesthetics from wood’s innate qualities. Other topics include the liberation of wood from its familiar associations to serve as the basis of modern design and the current status of wood houses as part of a larger urban or suburban development. A helpful appendix features project credits and a glossary. This beautiful volume will serve as both a reference and an inspiration for anyone who designs, builds, or simply lives in wood houses.

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21st Century House

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This richly illustrated survey, bound in an elegant portable format, profiles the most architecturally distinguished new houses from around the globe. 

The diversity of the fifty-five houses featured in this photo-packed volume, by architects like Alvaro Siza, Tony Fretton, Hild und K, Jim Jennings Architecture, and Souto Moura Architects, demonstrates that the single-family home continues to play a pivotal role as a means of architectural expression and experimentation in the new millennium. These structures, all designed, commenced, or completed in the past four years, range from Tucson’s Campbell Cliffs, a 25,000-square-foot mansion that reimagines Frank Lloyd Wright’s classic prairie style on a massive scale, to the Living Room in Gelnhausen, Germany, a house-cum-artwork whose living room can slide from the facade like a drawer to become a balcony!

Author Jonathan Bell, an experienced architecture journalist, divides the book into four chapters that correspond to the main trends he discerns in the featured buildings: “The House in the Landscape” presents houses that stand alone in the landscape as architectural statements in the grand Modernist tradition; “New Urban Sites” highlights homes that fit into a larger architectural fabric; “Pragmatic Solutions” focuses on designs for livable, affordable, and environmentally sustainable housing; and “The Future” surveys architects’ varying visions of tomorrow’s house. The case studies of individual houses within these chapters include not only the architects’ own plans and elevations but also a generous number of full-color interior and exterior photographs—some 300 in all.

Useful supplementary features, including an introduction that illuminates the present state of residential architecture and project credits that include contact information for the featured architects, ensure that this handily-sized volume will be welcomed by all practitioners, students, and enthusiasts of architecture.

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Great Country Houses of Central Europe

The Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Poland

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Largely neglected and unknown, the palaces, villas, and castles of Central Europe are revealed in the revised edition of this dazzling history.

In the heart of Central Europe stand some of the most elegant and grandly conceived country houses ever constructed, from medieval fortresses and Renaissance- era estates to baroque villas and neoclassical palaces. Until the last decade these illustrious residences were inaccessible to the West. This landmark volume presents these rarely seen treasures of the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, and Poland, nations that shelter a superb selection of Europe’s finest country houses, built over the centuries by some of the continent’s most distinguished families. Richly illustrated with specially commissioned photography, The Great Country Houses of Central Europe tells the stories of these magnificent buildings and the families that constructed them, immersing us in the vanished world of the region’s aristocracy.

Lord Michael Pratt sets his discussion of the houses and their patrons against the backdrop of Central European history. Beginning in the Middle Ages and continuing to the present day, this monumental study analyzes thirty of the region’s most important estates and introduces dozens of others. Although the primary focus is on the houses and the families that built them, gardens, grounds, and interiors are also illustrated in detail, including examples of furniture, decorative arts, and paintings. Splendid and surprising, these remarkable structures and the magisterial book that celebrates them display Central Europe in its full glory. 

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In Search of Natural Architecture

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A remarkable illustrated study by eco-architect David Pearson illuminating the rediscovery of ancient wisdom that, in turn, has inspired a spiritual reawakening in architecture.

In the past, building in harmony with nature was essential for survival. Today, our sense of ecological responsibility combines with a renewed understanding of the built environment’s influence on personal health and spiritual warmth to create a new type of architecture which reclaims that ancient harmony with nature. David Pearson, the renowned author of The New Natural House Book, has traveled the world in his quest to discover buildings that exemplify the three themes of this “natural architecture”: ecology, health, and spiritual awareness.

Drawing on his background as an architect specializing in housing, environmental issues, and holistic design, Pearson compiles a collection of “environmentally clean” and “spiritually healthy” buildings from around the world and across the centuries. Some are environmentally sound, some congenial to human well-being, and others spiritually powerful. He divides his discussion of these buildings, which are illustrated with 146 stunning full-color photographs and eighteen drawings, into six thematic chapters. The first chapter explains how ancient architectural forms like yurts and teepees reflect archetypes of human spirituality, while the second explores the rejuvenating qualities of today’s healing architecture. The third chapter focuses on ecologically aware building principles, the fourth on the lessons of traditional folk architecture, and the fifth on the culturally vibrant architecture of developing countries. The final chapter describes how all these architectural influences have led to a new awakening, which is embodied in architects’ organic designs for contemporary structures ranging from farmhouses to department stores.

Together the six chapters, which are augmented by a bibliography, a glossary, and a resource list giving contact information for the featured designers, comprise a provocative architectural journey, a must-read for anyone interested in designing or living in environmentally sound buildings that are in harmony with the landscape and the human spirit.

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New Spiritual Architecture

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This timely book reflects are awakening of interest in religious faiths and the emergence of a global exchange of architecture and culture.

While Spain’s Rafael Monco has just completed a cathedral in Los Angeles, Britain’s Thomas Heatherwick is designing a Buddhist temple in Japan, John Pawson is working on a Cistercian monastery in the Czech Republic, and Richard Meier has completed his Millennium Cathedral in Rome. As one Wallpaper* pundit commented, “religion is getting a redesign,” and the architect’s faith is as unimportant as his nationality. These buildings represent not only new ways of looking at religious architecture, but a vibrant cultural exchange that brings together the highest aesthetic and spiritual ideals, transcending religious and national boundaries.

New Spiritual Architecture looks at the approaches contemporary architects have taken to religious or meditative space, focusing on churches, chapels, temples, synagogues, and mosques that have been built in the last few years and represent a late-twentieth/early-twenty-first century aesthetic. These buildings demonstrate how new ideas and developments in urban, domestic, and public architecture inform designs for spaces intended for inspiration, worship, or meditation. The book is organized into five categories. “New Traditions” features buildings with radical formal idiosyncrasies. “Interventions” looks at urban sites designed to fit into the built landscape. “Retreats” are isolated sanctuaries that incorporate their natural settings as vital elements. “Grand Icons” examines the recent revival of large-scale religious architecture. Finally, the buildings in “Modest Magnificence” mold humble materials to generate a contemplative simplicity.

Each of the dozens of sites explored is graced with thorough documentation, including interior and exterior photography, both close-up and birds-eye views, alongside detailed floor plans accompanied by detailed captions. A sophisticated text by renowned architecture critic Phyllis Richardson weaves together the various themes and provides a crucial framework for considering what architecture has to say about the changing conditions of contemporary society, its beliefs, relationships, and material production.

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Great Monasteries of Europe

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This remarkable volume is the most comprehensive examination to date of the art and architecture of European monasteries, featuring an authoritative text and more than five hundred stunning, full-color photographs.

European cultural history is inextricably linked to the presence of monasteries, especially during the Middle Ages. In addition to serving as religious refuges, monasteries provided sanctuary for the pursuits of art, education, science, and book production. This lavishly illustrated book traces the development of the art and architecture of these important buildings, from early Carolingian examples in the eighth century to a modern structure by Le Corbusier in 1960.

This unsurpassed survey offers a fresh chronicle of a largely overlooked subject and hundreds of marvelous images, many of them newly photographed, of more than 150 of the most interesting and best preserved monasteries in Spain, Portugal, France, Great Britain, Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Poland, the Czech Republic, and Italy — all of which are accessible to visitors. Here are unique views of the art and architecture of such treasured places as Mont St. Michel, a wondrous Benedictine sanctuary off the coast of Brittany, and the fabled pilgrimage site in Assisi founded by St. Francis.

In an insightful text the author describes the cultural heritage of each of the monasteries portrayed and provides an introduction to monasticism and to the various orders dating from the early Christian era to the present. In addition, the volume offers plans of the sites, a glossary, and a bibliography. Historians and collectors of great books of art history will be intrigued by this unsurpassed collection of photographs and fascinating account of the artistic glory of European monasteries.

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Italian Villas

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This lavishly illustrated, authoritative volume presents the most notable Italian villas from the Renaissance to the present.

Roman in origin, the villa evolved from serving as a rural and farming center to a stately country residence. Over time the villa's agricultural function became secondary to a new ideal-a place for intellectual leisure and healthy country living. As a result, the new dwelling had to reflect a cultivated design as did its landscaping. Villas were no longer the work of unskilled laborers but of gifted architects, the best known of which is Andrea Palladio, whose style remains influential today.

In this fascinating volume, the author describes and illustrates 250 of the most remarkable villas from the 600-year-old tradition, some well-known houses, others generally overlooked. Presented here are panoramas and details of grand country villas and magnificent suburban estates, each with its own charm and history, and each of which contributes to a style that is still imitated in our century. The illustrations and text by Ovidio Guaita, representing decades of work, are grouped by region, north to south. Enriching the coverage, each chapter includes a profile of a personality — architect, builder, artist, or patron — whose work had a lasting influence on the culture of the villa.

Supplementing the color photographs of exteriors and interiors are architectural drawings of houses and maps. The appendices offer a glossary, a bibliography, and a listing of villas that may be visited

This splendid book should be of great appeal to those interested in architecture, art history, and travel.

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Twentieth-Century Residential Architecture

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A fascinating, detailed history of the international modern house, generously illustrated with 400 photographs and architectural drawings.

As the basic building block of the human environment, the house has served as an inexhaustible playground where architects experiment with theories, styles, forms, and materials. Arguably, the best and most innovative residential architecture has been conceived and realized over the past 100 years — from the cantileveral serenity of Frank Lloyd Wright's Fallingwater to the spectacular Chemosphere, which resembles a UFO that has planted its landing gear in the Hollywood Hills. This book, the first to chronicle the development of the modern house, examines major shifts in international domestic design over the past century as it highlights a superb selection of extraordinary homes.

Author Richard Weston engagingly tells the story of the twentieth-century house through eight semi-chronological design themes. From the Arts and Crafts period to the present, he covers a wide range of homes exemplifying each period and presents more than 100 benchmark dwellings with detailed architectural drawings. Weston also addresses the fascinating ways in which domestic design has both reflected and influenced the changing social climates and lifestyles of the past century, making this a book that will appeal to anthropologists, as well as architects, designers, and homeowners.

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The Houses of Philip Johnson

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The first book devoted to Philip Johnson's Glass House and his other innovative residential architecture.

For almost three-quarters of a century, as a critic and curator beginning in 1930s, and as a practicing architect since the 1940s, Philip Johnson has been at the center of modern architecture's development. His celebrated Glass House, built in 1949 in New Canaan, Connecticut — a crystallization of Johnson's commitment to the high modernism of his mentor Mies van der Rohe — is perhaps the single most famous house of the twentieth century. Until now, however, that house has not been looked at in the context of Johnson's many other house projects. This book, the first to comprehensively survey Johnson's residential work, not only brings to light a largely neglected side of Johnson's achievement, but freshly illuminates his entire career.

By examining all of Johnson's houses, authors Stover Jenkins and David Mohney, both architects, help us understand the Glass House as an expression of Johnson's developing thought. Focusing first on Johnson's student work at Harvard and his early commissions, they show how the Glass House reflects Johnson's concentrated study not only of pioneering modern architects including Frank Lloyd Wright and Le Corbusier, but of masters of previous centuries such as Claude-Nicolas Ledoux and Karl Friedrich Schinkel. They detail the three-year design process of the Glass House, and then show how Johnson moved beyond the influence of Mies to create a remarkably diverse body of work — one that is nevertheless unified by characteristic themes, like Johnson's inventive development of the Miesian court-house scheme, and his articulation of space by the use of connected pavilions.Johnson's clients have always included powerful patrons of art and architecture.

Presented in this book are his jewel-like townhouse for Blanchette Rockefeller and the Houston home of John and Dominique de Menil, with its enclosed court; projects for collector Joseph Hirshhorn; and the spectacular vacation house at Cap Bénat for the Biossonnas family. Recent projects include a sprawling desert compound in Israel and a village-like vacation residence in the Caribbean. But from the beginning, when Johnson submitted a house he built for himself in Cambridge, Massachusetts, as his graduate thesis, he has been his own most effective client.

The book concludes with a look at the ten built and seven unbuilt projects he has designed over the years for the New Canaan estate. As an afterword, the book includes a penetrating essay by architectural historian Neil Levine, who argues that we must now recognize Johnson's publication of the Glass House, in a 1950 article, as a turning point in the recognition of modernism as a historical movement.

Supporting a critical account of approximately thirty built and forty unbuilt projects, the book includes numerous plans and drawings, many never before published, and historical photographs. New color photographs by Steven Brooke capture the ways Johnson has used light, space, and landscape to create some of modernism's most appealing houses. Essential reading for architects and students, this book is also a vital resource for the study of one of modern architecture's most influential figures.

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