Art and Design: Architecture

New Spiritual Architecture

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This timely book reflects are awakening of interest in religious faiths and the emergence of a global exchange of architecture and culture.

While Spain’s Rafael Monco has just completed a cathedral in Los Angeles, Britain’s Thomas Heatherwick is designing a Buddhist temple in Japan, John Pawson is working on a Cistercian monastery in the Czech Republic, and Richard Meier has completed his Millennium Cathedral in Rome. As one Wallpaper* pundit commented, “religion is getting a redesign,” and the architect’s faith is as unimportant as his nationality. These buildings represent not only new ways of looking at religious architecture, but a vibrant cultural exchange that brings together the highest aesthetic and spiritual ideals, transcending religious and national boundaries.

New Spiritual Architecture looks at the approaches contemporary architects have taken to religious or meditative space, focusing on churches, chapels, temples, synagogues, and mosques that have been built in the last few years and represent a late-twentieth/early-twenty-first century aesthetic. These buildings demonstrate how new ideas and developments in urban, domestic, and public architecture inform designs for spaces intended for inspiration, worship, or meditation. The book is organized into five categories. “New Traditions” features buildings with radical formal idiosyncrasies. “Interventions” looks at urban sites designed to fit into the built landscape. “Retreats” are isolated sanctuaries that incorporate their natural settings as vital elements. “Grand Icons” examines the recent revival of large-scale religious architecture. Finally, the buildings in “Modest Magnificence” mold humble materials to generate a contemplative simplicity.

Each of the dozens of sites explored is graced with thorough documentation, including interior and exterior photography, both close-up and birds-eye views, alongside detailed floor plans accompanied by detailed captions. A sophisticated text by renowned architecture critic Phyllis Richardson weaves together the various themes and provides a crucial framework for considering what architecture has to say about the changing conditions of contemporary society, its beliefs, relationships, and material production.

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Great Monasteries of Europe

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This remarkable volume is the most comprehensive examination to date of the art and architecture of European monasteries, featuring an authoritative text and more than five hundred stunning, full-color photographs.

European cultural history is inextricably linked to the presence of monasteries, especially during the Middle Ages. In addition to serving as religious refuges, monasteries provided sanctuary for the pursuits of art, education, science, and book production. This lavishly illustrated book traces the development of the art and architecture of these important buildings, from early Carolingian examples in the eighth century to a modern structure by Le Corbusier in 1960.

This unsurpassed survey offers a fresh chronicle of a largely overlooked subject and hundreds of marvelous images, many of them newly photographed, of more than 150 of the most interesting and best preserved monasteries in Spain, Portugal, France, Great Britain, Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Poland, the Czech Republic, and Italy — all of which are accessible to visitors. Here are unique views of the art and architecture of such treasured places as Mont St. Michel, a wondrous Benedictine sanctuary off the coast of Brittany, and the fabled pilgrimage site in Assisi founded by St. Francis.

In an insightful text the author describes the cultural heritage of each of the monasteries portrayed and provides an introduction to monasticism and to the various orders dating from the early Christian era to the present. In addition, the volume offers plans of the sites, a glossary, and a bibliography. Historians and collectors of great books of art history will be intrigued by this unsurpassed collection of photographs and fascinating account of the artistic glory of European monasteries.

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Italian Villas

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This lavishly illustrated, authoritative volume presents the most notable Italian villas from the Renaissance to the present.

Roman in origin, the villa evolved from serving as a rural and farming center to a stately country residence. Over time the villa's agricultural function became secondary to a new ideal-a place for intellectual leisure and healthy country living. As a result, the new dwelling had to reflect a cultivated design as did its landscaping. Villas were no longer the work of unskilled laborers but of gifted architects, the best known of which is Andrea Palladio, whose style remains influential today.

In this fascinating volume, the author describes and illustrates 250 of the most remarkable villas from the 600-year-old tradition, some well-known houses, others generally overlooked. Presented here are panoramas and details of grand country villas and magnificent suburban estates, each with its own charm and history, and each of which contributes to a style that is still imitated in our century. The illustrations and text by Ovidio Guaita, representing decades of work, are grouped by region, north to south. Enriching the coverage, each chapter includes a profile of a personality — architect, builder, artist, or patron — whose work had a lasting influence on the culture of the villa.

Supplementing the color photographs of exteriors and interiors are architectural drawings of houses and maps. The appendices offer a glossary, a bibliography, and a listing of villas that may be visited

This splendid book should be of great appeal to those interested in architecture, art history, and travel.

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Angkor

Celestial Temples of the Khmer Empire

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An exquisitely illustrated history and exploration of Angkor, the world's most astonishing architectural treasure. This gorgeous volume is handsomely packaged in a slipcase, perfect for presentation.

Built between the ninth and the thirteenth centuries by a succession of twelve Khmer kings, Angkor spreads over 120 square miles in Southeast Asia and includes scores of major architectural sites. In 802, when construction began on Angkor Wat, financed by wealth from rice and trade, Jayavarman II took the throne, initiating an unparalleled period of artistic and architectural achievement, exemplified in the fabled ruins of Angkor, center of the ancient empire. Among the amazing pyramid-and mandala-shaped shrines preserved in the jungles of Cambodia is Angkor Wat, the world's largest temple, an extraordinarily complex structure filled with iconographic detail and religious symbolism.

Perhaps because of the decline of agricultural productivity and the expansion of the Thai Empire, Angkor was abandoned in the fifteenth century and left to the ravages of time. Today many countries are working to conserve and restore the temples, which have been inaccessible until recently. Now that the civil war has ended, Angkor is being reborn and is an increasingly popular tourist destination.

Undaunted by the difficulties of traveling through Cambodia and eastern Thailand, Jon Ortner, accompanied by his wife, Martha, photographed fifty of the most important and unique monuments of the Khmer Empire. His images include spectacular views from the rooftops of its temples, glorious landscapes, and details of inscriptions and art that few have ever seen. Beautifully reproduced in Angkor, the photographs are accompanied by a fascinating text written by a team of experts, providing historical, architectural, and religious analyses of Angkor and the Khmer civilization.

The appendix includes a glossary, a chronology of construction, and a chart of the kings and their accomplishments. Black-and-white floor plans and historic watercolors complete this breathtaking tribute.

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Twentieth-Century Residential Architecture

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A fascinating, detailed history of the international modern house, generously illustrated with 400 photographs and architectural drawings.

As the basic building block of the human environment, the house has served as an inexhaustible playground where architects experiment with theories, styles, forms, and materials. Arguably, the best and most innovative residential architecture has been conceived and realized over the past 100 years — from the cantileveral serenity of Frank Lloyd Wright's Fallingwater to the spectacular Chemosphere, which resembles a UFO that has planted its landing gear in the Hollywood Hills. This book, the first to chronicle the development of the modern house, examines major shifts in international domestic design over the past century as it highlights a superb selection of extraordinary homes.

Author Richard Weston engagingly tells the story of the twentieth-century house through eight semi-chronological design themes. From the Arts and Crafts period to the present, he covers a wide range of homes exemplifying each period and presents more than 100 benchmark dwellings with detailed architectural drawings. Weston also addresses the fascinating ways in which domestic design has both reflected and influenced the changing social climates and lifestyles of the past century, making this a book that will appeal to anthropologists, as well as architects, designers, and homeowners.

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The Houses of Philip Johnson

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The first book devoted to Philip Johnson's Glass House and his other innovative residential architecture.

For almost three-quarters of a century, as a critic and curator beginning in 1930s, and as a practicing architect since the 1940s, Philip Johnson has been at the center of modern architecture's development. His celebrated Glass House, built in 1949 in New Canaan, Connecticut — a crystallization of Johnson's commitment to the high modernism of his mentor Mies van der Rohe — is perhaps the single most famous house of the twentieth century. Until now, however, that house has not been looked at in the context of Johnson's many other house projects. This book, the first to comprehensively survey Johnson's residential work, not only brings to light a largely neglected side of Johnson's achievement, but freshly illuminates his entire career.

By examining all of Johnson's houses, authors Stover Jenkins and David Mohney, both architects, help us understand the Glass House as an expression of Johnson's developing thought. Focusing first on Johnson's student work at Harvard and his early commissions, they show how the Glass House reflects Johnson's concentrated study not only of pioneering modern architects including Frank Lloyd Wright and Le Corbusier, but of masters of previous centuries such as Claude-Nicolas Ledoux and Karl Friedrich Schinkel. They detail the three-year design process of the Glass House, and then show how Johnson moved beyond the influence of Mies to create a remarkably diverse body of work — one that is nevertheless unified by characteristic themes, like Johnson's inventive development of the Miesian court-house scheme, and his articulation of space by the use of connected pavilions.Johnson's clients have always included powerful patrons of art and architecture.

Presented in this book are his jewel-like townhouse for Blanchette Rockefeller and the Houston home of John and Dominique de Menil, with its enclosed court; projects for collector Joseph Hirshhorn; and the spectacular vacation house at Cap Bénat for the Biossonnas family. Recent projects include a sprawling desert compound in Israel and a village-like vacation residence in the Caribbean. But from the beginning, when Johnson submitted a house he built for himself in Cambridge, Massachusetts, as his graduate thesis, he has been his own most effective client.

The book concludes with a look at the ten built and seven unbuilt projects he has designed over the years for the New Canaan estate. As an afterword, the book includes a penetrating essay by architectural historian Neil Levine, who argues that we must now recognize Johnson's publication of the Glass House, in a 1950 article, as a turning point in the recognition of modernism as a historical movement.

Supporting a critical account of approximately thirty built and forty unbuilt projects, the book includes numerous plans and drawings, many never before published, and historical photographs. New color photographs by Steven Brooke capture the ways Johnson has used light, space, and landscape to create some of modernism's most appealing houses. Essential reading for architects and students, this book is also a vital resource for the study of one of modern architecture's most influential figures.

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The World Trade Center Remembered

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A stirring photographic tribute to the World Trade Center towers, which were the icons of the New York City skyline.

Rising dramatically above all other skyscrapers at the tip of Manhattan, the World Trade Center symbolized New York. From any direction the Towers were lodestars, Manhattan's local mountains. Nearly a decade after the dark events of 9/11, New Yorkers continue to come to terms with the tragedy, and to reminisce about the views of the Towers they once had from their homes and offices. Visitors, too, are remembering how the WTC looked as they approached Manhattan by car, plane, or from the water. As we mourn for the terrible loss of life, we also want to remember. The 72 images of the World Trade Center presented in this book depict a New York we once knew, one we are now working to rebuild.

For more than two decades, practically since the Twin Towers were erected, Sonja Bullaty and Angelo Lomeo have been photographing these awesome buildings. The pictures featured here portray the WTC from all directions, starting with views from the east at dawn, and ending with evening views from the west. There are captivating panoramas from Brooklyn, Lower Manhattan, New Jersey, and uptown, taken in all seasons, as well as a section showing the grand Plaza at the center of the buildings. Together, they create an unforgettable portrait of the Twin Towers.

Introducing this extraordinary collection of photographs, Paul Goldberger's text evokes the Towers and the city they came to symbolize. He recalls how they evolved in the public mind, targets of criticism to beloved American icons. He explains their architectural significance and explores their visceral meaning to New Yorkers.

In contrast to books depicting the disaster and the days following it, this photographic memoir will be welcomed by all of us— New Yorkers and visitors alike — who yearn to remember the way the city was.A portion of the book's proceeds are donated to the Twin Towers Scholarship Program care of Scholarship America.

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Antonio Gaudi

Master Architect

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A beautifully illustrated and comprehensive view of the fanciful, exuberant buildings by this inspired Spanish architect, whose structures and sculptures have defined Barcelona's cityscape.

Antonio Gaudí (1852-1926) is one of the most admired architects of the twentieth century. Even today, some seventy-five years after Gaudí's death, his fanciful, exuberant buildings define Barcelona's cityscape and continue to influence architects, sculptors, and designers. Perhaps best known for the dynamic, sculptural facades, found on such buildings as the church of the Sagrada Familia and Casa Milà, Gaudí is as much respected as a technological innovator as a daring stylist.

In this enlightening volume, a concise, knowledgeable text by the director of the Royal Gaudí Chair at the Polytechnical University of Catalonia (Barcelona) combines with striking images by a well-known architectural photographer to provide a new perspective on Gaudí's remarkable career. The text covers the full range of his oeuvre, describing early assignments in the 1870s as a draftsman for leading architects in Barcelona, the innovative buildings he created for the Güell Palace and Estate, daring new structural solutions at Bellesguard, architecture inspired by nature at the Casa Calvet and in the Park Güell, and the construction of his unfinished masterpiece, the Church of the Sagrada Familia, which occupied him until his death. The author traces all the influences that led to his definitive style, from his fascination with the Orient and neogothicism to his affinity for naturalism and specific geometric forms.

Brilliantly illustrated, this incisive overview of Gaudís visionary work is ideal for those who delight in his architecture as well as those who look forward to traveling to Spain to see his monumental legacy.

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Barkitecture

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From miniature chateaus to modernist boxes, from anthromorphic abodes to classical temples, this book showcases nearly fifty one-of-a-kind doggy domiciles from across America.

In Barkitecture, architecture and design writer Fred Albert has collected some of the most wonderful and fantastic doghouses ever created. Examples include doghouses with clock towers and thatch roofs, doghouses shaped like TV sets, and even some thant look like dogs.

The book begins with an introduction that includes an entertaining history of the doghouse, accompanied by photos and drawings of noteworthy historical examples. Four Chapters follow: "Putting on the Dog" highlights stylish period reproductions; "Modern Barkitecture" includes cutting-edge "Bowhouse" designs; "A Breed Apart" features houses inspired by everyday objects; and the final chapter, "Puppourri," showcases wacky, one-of-a-kind structures that defy categorization.

Each house is illustrated by one or two color images and is accompanied by a witty, tounge-in-jowl text that describes the structure's design and building materials, the creators' inspirations,and their dogs' reactions.

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The Rockefeller Family Home: Kykuit

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A warm, intimate portrait of the grand family estate of six generations of Rockefellers.

Kykuit-the country home of John D. Rockefeller Sr., John D. Rockefeller Jr., Nelson A. Rockefeller, and their families-stands majestically atop a hill overlooking the Hudson River. Built between 1906 and 1913 by architects Delano and Aldrich, it has just recently been opened to the public. But visitors will never see the estate in as intimate a way as it is presented in this volume.

To preserve the memory of what Kykuit was like when it was a private home, photographer Mary Louise Pierson, granddaughter of Nelson Rockefeller, spent years photographing the estate: the Big House-as family members call the main residence-and its interiors, designed by the renowned Ogden Codman; the outbuildings, including the Coach Barn, which now houses an impressive collection of horse-drawn carriages and an equally noteworthy collection of vintage cars, the orangerie, and the Playhouse, a Tudor-style mansion containing an indoor swimming pool, tennis court, fully equipped gym, and bowling alley; and the magnificent gardens, from the formal gardens designed by William Welles Bosworth to the golf course to the Japanese garden, and all the sculptures that three generations of Rockefellers installed on the grounds.

The text, by Ann Rockefeller Roberts, Governor Rockefeller's daughter, recounts the history of the magnificent estate, from its founding early in the century through its recent transfer to the National Trust, focusing on how each successive generation left its stamp on the decor, the gardens, and the painting and sculpture collections. Illustrated with dozens of historical photos, ranging from the construction of the house to snapshots of family members, the text includes never before published reminiscences of five generations of Rockefellers.

Complete with a family tree, a map of the gardens, and visitor information, The Rockefeller Family Home: Kykuit offers a deeply personal look at the country residence of one of America's most distinguished families.

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Frank Lloyd Wright

America's Master Architect

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A comprehensive and affordable view of the master architect's entire oeuvre, including private residences, public buildings, furnishings, and decorative pieces.

Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959) is unquestionably America's most celebrated architect. Even today, almost forty years after his death, he continues to tower over the architectural landscape. In fact, his career was so long and his accomplishments so varied it can be difficult still to grasp the full range of Wright's achievement.

In this refreshing new study, Wright scholar Kathryn Smith does just that, exploring the grace and beauty found in all facets of Wright's work: from office desks and chairs to his first residential commissions, from magazine cover designs to major public buildings. The concise text and brilliant color photographs chart Wright's entire career, beginning with his apprenticeship to Adler and Sullivan before the turn of the century. Readers witness the Prairie period, Wright's years in Japan and California, his major designs of the late 1920s and 1930s, his Usonian houses, and the monumental late works of his last decades. Smith shows examples of Wright's drawings, furniture, and decorative arts, too, supplementing our understanding of Wright's aesthetic. The book concludes with a glimpse at the architect's seldom-seen collection of Asian art, which once comprised tens of thousands of pieces — a source of much inspiration and edification for the architect and his students, and a key to understanding Wright's views on art and nature.

Here is a broad portrait of the master builder who sought the title "greatest architect of all time." Although it may never be possible to fully assess Wright's legacy, Kathryn Smith's authoritative book is a fitting testament to his lasting genius.

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Holy Terrors

Gargoyles on Medieval Buildings

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A charming survey of these mischievous creatures, illustrated with engaging color photographs from the rooftops of Europe and Great Britain.

Multitudes of gargoyles haunt the medieval buildings of western Europe, peering down from churches and cathedrals, houses and town halls. Holy Terrors offers a fresh and irresistible history of these wildly varied characters — a society of stone creatures perched high above the workaday world.

The true gargoyle is a waterspout, an architectural necessity that medieval artisans transformed into functional fantasies. The informative introduction to Holy Terrors explains everything that is known or conjectured about the history, the construction, the purposes, and the mysterious meanings of these often rude and rowdy characters. The three chapters that follow are devoted to the gargoyles themselves, imaginatively carved of stone in the form of people, real animals, and fantastic beasts. In clear, lively language, Janetta Rebold Benton puts these personality-filled sculptures into the context of medieval life and art and captures their quirky diversity in her engaging color photographs.

Concluding the book is an invaluable guide to gargoyle sites throughout western Europe, as well as suggestions for further reading. This is the first book for adults to provide an intelligent and entertaining overview of medieval gargoyles, and it is bound to increase the already abundant legions of gargoyle admirers.

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St. Petersburg

Architecture of the Tsars

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Lavishly illustrated and elegantly written, this volume takes us on an architectural tour of one of the world's most beautiful and enchanting cities.

Before becoming a city, St. Petersburg was a utopian vision in the mind of its founder, Peter the Great. Conceived by him as Russia's "window to the West," it evolved into a remarkably harmonious assemblage of baroque, rococo, neoclassical, and art nouveau buildings that reflect his taste and that of his successors, including Anna I, Elizabeth I, Catherine the Great, and Paul I.

Crisscrossed by rivers and canals, this "Venice of the North," as Goethe dubbed it, is of unique beauty. Never before has that beauty been captured as eloquently as on the pages of this sumptuous volume. From the stately mansions lining the fabled Nevsky Prospekt to the magnificent palaces of the tsars on the outskirts of the city, including Peterhof, Tsarskoe Selo, Oranienbaum, Gatchina, and Pavlovsk, photographer Alexander Orloff's portrait of St. Petersburg does full justice to the vision of its founder and namesake. The text, by art historian Dmitri Shvidkovsky, chronicles the history of the city's planning and construction from Peter the Great's time to the reign of the last tsar, Nicholas II.

Anyone who has ever visited--or dreamed of visiting--the city of "white nights" will find St. Petersburg irresistible.

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Charles Rennie Mackintosh

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Published to accompany a major international retrospective, this authoritative, lavishly illustrated volume will be the definitive book on Mackintosh for years to come.

Architect, interior designer, furniture designer, painter, and graphic artist, Charles Rennie Mackintosh (1868-1928) was a modern Renaissance man. This far-ranging book by the leading scholars in the field offers new information and ideas about many aspects of Mackintosh's work: his famous tea rooms, his distinctive furniture, and his evocative paintings.

In addition, individual chapters are devoted to his two most remarkable surviving buildings—the Glasgow School of Art and The Hill House—and are each illustrated with specially commissioned color photographs.

The authors also provide a fresh and thoughtful look at Mackintosh's context in turn-of-the-century Glasgow and London while revising many of the myths that have long obscured his life and career. His extensive collaboration with his wife, Margaret Macdonald, and his working relationships with his mentors and patrons receive enlightening scrutiny as well.

This authoritative volume—which accompanies a major retrospective with an international tour, organized by the Glasgow Museums—also contains an extensive chronology, a cast of characters, a selected bibliography, and an appendix of the Mackintosh buildings and interiors that are still in existence. Informative, eloquent, lavishly illustrated, and elegantly designed, this will be the definitive book on Mackintosh for years to come.

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Julia Morgan, Architect

Revised Edition

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This award-wining monograph — now revised and available in an updated paperback version — helped spread Julia Morgan's fame beyond California, where her "castle" for William Randolph Hearst and her cherished Bay Area houses have long made her one of the region's best-known architects.

William Randolph Hearst's dazzling "castle" at San Simeon, California, is famous world round, yet only the aficionado can name Julia Morgan as the architect who built it. For more than thirty years she worked with Hearst in a rare collaboration, creating not only his art-filled hilltop palace but also a fairy-tale Bavarian "village" known as Wyntoon and many other commercial and domestic structures. Yet the Hearst commissions, notable as they are, are not Morgan's only claim to fame.

One of the first women to graduate in civil engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, Morgan was the first woman ever to earn a certificate in architecture from the prestigious Ecole des Beaux-Arts in Paris. Returning to her native San Francisco in 1902, she was well placed to profit from the surge of building that followed the great earthquake just four years later. A member of an informal "old-girls'" network that linked the leaders of the increasingly active women's organizations, Morgan received commissions for schools, clubs, and conference centers, including major YWCA buildings from Salt Lake City to Honolulu. Churches, hospitals, sanitariums, sororities, and shopping centers-she designed them all, in a long career notable for a total of more than 700 structures designed and built. Her light-filled houses were carefully crafted in styles ranging from Arts and Crafts to Mediterranean and sizes ranging from modest cottage to elegant mansion. Her swimming pools were voluptuous, climaxing in the two peacock-hued beauties at San Simeon.

Given the sweep of Morgan's accomplishments, it is astonishing that this is the first substantial book ever devoted to her career. Painstakingly researched for more than a decade by Sara Holmes Boutelle, founder of the Julia Morgan Association, this handsome volume lovingly documents Morgan's life and work. Letters, snapshots, working sketches, and blueprints bring the process of architecture to life, while striking photographs commissioned especially for the book record the results of Morgan's multifaceted creativity, from the china she designed for the Berkeley Women's City Club to the tiled towers and gilded ceilings at San Simeon. This is a remarkable book celebrating the achievements of a remarkable woman.

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Great American Houses and Their Architectural Styles

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A sumptuously illustrated, authoritative introduction to the principal architectural and decorating styles of the American house, from Colonial times to the mid-twentieth century.

In this lavishly produced volume, authors Virginia and Lee McAlester explore outstanding landmark houses that exemplify America's major architectural and interior design styles from Colonial times to the mid-twentieth century. These twenty-five houses are illustrated with more than 350 specially commissioned full-color photographs of interior and exterior views, 125 black-and-white line drawings and floor plans, historical paintings, and vintage photographs

The text not only discusses the houses' architectural innovations and design elements but also profiles the architects and their clients. The featured houses were built by many of the country's leading architects — from Alexander Jackson Davis, Richard Morris Hunt, Henry Hobson Richardson, and McKim, Mead and White to Frank Lloyd Wright, the Greene brothers, and Walter Gropius — and owned by some of its most celebrated citizens, including Thomas Jefferson, Mark Twain, Thomas Edison, Jay Gould, the Guggenheims, the Phippses, and the Vanderbilts. As a result, the book is as much a cultural history as it is an architectural study. The authors also include an informative discussion of each style as it can be seen in vernacular versions around the country.

Located all over the United States, most of the featured houses are open to the public, and the book provides their addresses and other helpful information for visitors. Great American Houses and Their Architectural Styles will be irresistible to all house lovers, architects, and designers, and will give readers a deeper understanding and appreciation of our rich architectural heritage.

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Architecture of the Old South

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From early colonial times to the onset of the Civil War, the finest examples of antebellum architecture in the South are revealed in glorious photographs and a scholarly text.

This handsome volume is the culmination of a distinguished series that has explored the historic buildings of the Old South. The fruit of fifteen years of travel and research, Architecture of the Old South surveys the most beautiful and historic buildings of the region and illustrates them with color photographs, old prints and drawings. The authoritative, and sometimes amusing, text documents a surprising conclusion: that most of the great buildings of the Old South were created by Yankee builders and that the South participated more fully in the mainstream of American life before the Civil War than has been fully appreciated.

Indeed, the illustrations and text of Architecture of the Old South, though presenting famous shrines, explore the unexpected by-ways of Southern architecture and history. The great buildings of great cities—Baltimore, Charleston, Savannah and New Orleans—and plantations and country houses of the gentry are well represented. But here also can be found a wealth of the unfamiliar: frontier cabins, eccentric houses built by gentlemen amateurs, grand designs of professional designers from England and Europe.

When the Architecture of the Old South series was begun in 1981, the New York Times praised the first of these volumes as "dignified and handsome, with engaging texts that strike a neat balance between architectural scholarship and social history."

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Bernard Maybeck

Visionary Architect

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This bestselling volume chronicles one of the most innovative, influential, and beloved architects of the early 20th century.

Gracefully written and brilliantly illustrated, this handsome new volume captures the vision, the wit, and the down-to-earth inventiveness of one of the most influential and beloved architects of the early twentieth century.

Raised in Greenwich Village and trained in Paris, Maybeck spent most of his long career in northern California. An irrepressible bohemian with no desire to run a large office, he spent much of his time designing houses for friends and family, as well as for other patrons so loyal that they often hired him to design more than one house. Maybeck also created two of the most beautiful buildings in all of California: the exhilarating Church of Christ, Scientist, in Berkeley, and the gloriously romantic Palace of Fine Arts, in San Francisco.

This incisive overview—the first to feature color reproductions of Maybeck's exquisite interiors and exteriors—analyzes every aspect of his life and work. Not only his architecture but also his furniture, his lighting designs, and his innovations in fire-resistant construction are thoroughly discussed and illustrated. The book is also enlivened by documentary photographs, by clearly drawn plans, and by several of Maybeck's dazzling, previously unpublished visionary drawings.

Bernard Maybeck is a major study of an internationally significant architect whose environmentally responsive work has much to offer today's designers and whose houses have given enormous pleasure to those fortunate enough to visit or dwell in them.

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