Art and Design

Saints in Art and History

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A book of saints at once beautiful and profound

Saints in Art and History presents the lives of some 150 saints in chronological order, from the family of Jesus and the early Christian martyrs, to the founders of the great religious orders, to modern holy figures like Mother Teresa. This arrangement reveals the tremendous impact that the saints have had on the history of the Catholic faith, and on world history. The lives of the saints are illustrated not only with works of great art—by Memling, Raphael, and Bernini, among many others—but also by popular images, such as folk carvings and votive postcards. 

A thoughtful introduction explores the nature of sainthood, the role of saints in Catholicism, and the significance of their images. Other special features include a visual dictionary of the saints’ attributes, and a map showing the patron saints of the nations of the world. This attractive volume is at once a valuable resource for art historians and other scholars, and a splendid gift for Easter or any occasion.

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Passion by Design

The Art and Times of Tamara de Lempicka

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An attractive new hardcover edition of the classic biography of Tamara de Lempicka, whose paintings defined Art Deco and whose life epitomized the Jazz Age

Tamara de Lempicka’s paintings defined Art Deco, and her life epitomized the Jazz Age. Possessed of a dazzling talent, a striking beauty, and an irresistible force of personality, this refugee of the Russian Revolution achieved success on her own terms. She conquered 1920s Paris with her polished portraits of the rich and famous and her coolly erotic nudes, and went on to a glamorous existence in Hollywood, New York, Houston, and Cuernavaca, never putting down her brush.

Passion by Design offers an intimate look at a fascinating figure: these are Tamara’s own stories, just as she related them to rapt audiences. They were compiled and edited just after her death by her daughter Kizette, who wove them into a complete life story, incorporating much additional biographical and historical information.

This new edition of Passion by Design is illustrated with an expanded selection of Tamara’s paintings—including a number of little-known works—as well as exclusive photographs from family albums. A new introduction by Marisa de Lempicka, Tamara’s great-granddaughter, explores the legacy of this trailblazing artist, whose paintings now fetch eight-figure sums and whose style continues to inspire creators in every field.

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Deep Affinities

Art and Science

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An illustrated exploration of the fundamental connections between art and science, from an author who has lived in both worlds


In this thought-provoking book, Philip F. Palmedo, a former physicist who now writes on art, reveals how the two defining enterprises of humankind—art and science—are rooted in certain common instincts, which we might call aesthetic: an appreciation of symmetry, balance, and rhythm; the drive to simplify and abstract natural forms, and to represent them symbolically.


Palmedo traces these instincts back to a very early time in human history—demonstrating, for example, the level of abstract thinking required to create the stone tools and cave paintings of the Paleolithic—and then forward, to the builders of the Gothic cathedrals, to Leonardo da Vinci and Isaac Newton, to Einstein and Picasso.


Illustrated with more than 125 creations of the genus Homo—from a flint hand ax chipped half a million years ago to the abstractions of Hilma af Klint and the James Webb Space Telescope—Palmedo’s text leaves us with a new appreciation of the instinct for beauty shared by artists and scientists alike.

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Fashion

Treasures of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

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A visual history of fashion that fits in the palm of your hand

Drawing from the extensive Textile and Fashion Arts Collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, this miniature history of European and American fashion features some 275 garments, accessories, and related works of art from the seventeenth century to the present.  Dress historian Allison Taylor introduces each new era with a concise overview of the period’s fashionable styles and silhouettes, as well as the underlying historical and cultural influences. This chic Tiny Folio™ is the perfect gift for fashionistas and fashion historians alike.

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The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn

Norman Rockwell Collector's Edition

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A great American novelist, illustrated by a great American artist—now available in a collectible two-volume set


In 1936, the Heritage Press, a publisher of fine editions, commissioned Norman Rockwell to illustrate Mark Twain’s Adventures of Tom Sawyer; four years later, they asked him to illustrate The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn as well. For each book, Rockwell created eight full-color paintings and numerous pen-and-ink drawings, the product of extensive on-the-ground research in Twain’s hometown of Hannibal, Missouri. Famously, Rockwell even tried to buy some Hannibal residents’ old clothes, to dress his models in.


For years, the Rockwell editions of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn have been unavailable in stores. Now, Abbeville Press is proud to reissue them as a handsome new clothbound set. The color plates are reproduced from new photography of Rockwell’s original paintings, the typesetting has been done anew to a high standard, and new introductions—illustrated with Rockwell’s rarely seen preliminary sketches—examine this unique encounter between two legendary chroniclers of America.
Publisher’s note: These volumes present Mark Twain’s text unabridged and unedited, as it appeared in the original American editions of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (1876) and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1885).

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Posh Portals

Elegant Entrances and Ingratiating Ingresses to Apartments for the Affluent in New York City

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An illustrated tour of the elegant entrances to New York City’s most celebrated apartment houses

This handsome, oversized book introduces us to the grandest entrances of New York City’s residential buildings. These posh portals come in an array of forms and styles, such as the porte cochere, with a passage to admit carriages or motor cars; the classic awning, originally meant to be retracted in good weather; and Neoclassical, Romanesque, and Gothic revivals. 

Architectural historian Andrew Alpern highlights approximately 140 entrances, from the nineteenth century to the present, including those of the Dakota, the first true luxury apartment house in New York; San Remo, one of Central Park West’s most impressive apartment houses; and the Ansonia, at one time the largest hotel in the world. Each entrance is accompanied by a description of its signal features and the history of the building that surrounds it. All are represented in splendid color photographs, and many by charming watercolor drawings.

These ornate entrances offer a glimpse into New York’s past, as well as its future―for today, once again, entryways have begun to feature heavily in the marketing of residential buildings. Posh Portals will be an inspiration for architects and a delight for city dwellers.

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Watercolor

A History

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The most comprehensive and best-illustrated history of watercolor painting ever published

The term watercolor calls to mind atmosphere, luminosity, and immediacy―qualities that derive directly from the quick-drying, translucent nature of water-based pigments. In Watercolor: A History, Louvre curator Marie-Pierre Salé provides an authoritative and beautifully illustrated account of this versatile and widely beloved artistic medium.

Salé’s incisive text traces the development of watercolor from the thirteenth to the twentieth century in Europe and the United States, encompassing every type of work―from plein-air sketches to finished studio pieces―and a wide variety of artists. Here are Dürer’s detailed animal studies, Turner’s landscapes, Cézanne’s tireless explorations, Sargent’s light-dappled sketches, O’Keeffe’s pioneering abstractions.

This handsome volume features more than three hundred full-color illustrations, specially printed on Munken paper to capture the vibrancy and texture of the original works. It is sure to be welcomed by art historians and art lovers alike.

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Enchanted

A History of Fantasy Illustration

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The first-ever history of fantasy art and illustration

For hundreds of years artists have been inspired by the imaginative potential of fantasy. Unlike science fiction, which is based on fact, fantasy presents an impossible reality-a universe where dragons breathe fire, angels battle demons, and magicians weave spells. Published to coincide with a major exhibition, this handsome volume reveals how artists have brought to life mythology, fables, and fairy tales, as well as modern epics like the Lord of the Rings, Game of Thrones, and Final Fantasy.

Written by leading historians of the field, Enchanted traces the development of fantasy art from Old Masters like Bosch, Dürer, and Henry Fuseli, through Golden Age illustrators like Arthur Rackham and Howard Pyle, to classic cover artists like Frank Frazetta and Boris Vallejo, and emerging talents like Anna Dittmann and Heather Edwards. More than 150 key works-including paintings, prints, drawings, and digital art-are illustrated in vibrant color, many at full-page size. 

Enchanted is a must-have reference for artists and illustrators, and a delight for all lovers of fantasy.

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Ronald Bladen

Sculpture

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The first monograph on a pivotal figure of postwar American art
 
Best known for his monumental sculptures, Ronald Bladen (1918–1988) was regarded as an artistic forerunner by such minimalist artists as Donald Judd, Sol Lewitt, and Carl Andre. But in contrast to the matter-of-fact work of these artists, Bladen’s pieces evoke the emotional power of sculpture, what the artist called “presence.” His objects fill entire rooms, pressing outward against the walls and ceiling; his themes include the force of gravity, the dynamism of planar surfaces, the impact of scale, and confrontation with the viewer.
 
This splendidly illustrated volume presents a comprehensive overview of Bladen’s career: his breakthrough sculptures such as Three Elements (1965), a standout at the Jewish Museum’s legendary Primary Structures exhibition, later acquired by the Museum of Modern Art; his monumental outdoor commissions of the late 1960s through the 1980s; and his intricate reflective wall reliefs of the 1980s. Bladen’s working models and drawings are examined in detail, and his early career as a painter is considered in the light of his later work. Also included are selections from the critical literature on Bladen, and an illustrated chronology of his life and work.
 
Ronald Bladen: Sculpture is an essential volume on an artist who continues to influence a wide range of sculptors, from Richard Serra to Ursula von Rydingsvard.

 

 

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Yoshitoshi

One Hundred Aspects of the Moon

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A beautiful facsimile edition of the final masterpiece of ukiyo-e—strictly limited to 3,000 numbered copies

Yoshitoshi (1839–1892) was the last virtuoso of the Japanese woodblock print, and the One Hundred Aspects of the Moon, published between 1885 and 1892, were his crowning achievement. This series—illustrating scenes from history, legend, and contemporary life, unified by the motif of the moon—abounds with stylistic innovations, drawn from Western art and the artist's own fertile imagination. Even as traditional woodblock prints were being supplanted by mass media like lithography, an eager public snapped up Yoshitoshi's images—many of which were sold out on the morning of their publication.

This magnificent facsimile of One Hundred Aspects of the Moon reproduces each print at its original size, facing an explanation of the subject. A thorough introductory text, augmented with many comparative illustrations, traces Yoshitoshi's career and the genesis of this series. Printed and bound to the most exacting specifications, this volume will be a must for aficionados of Japanese prints.

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Patterns in Art

A Closer Look at the Old masters

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A visual delight, and a designer's dream-the decorative details of great European paintings transformed into beautiful two-dimensional patterns

Richly embroidered robes. Intricate lace collars. Elaborately laid floor tiles. Delicately carved and modeled cornices and capitals. These are among the details of decorative art that the Old Masters lovingly rendered in their paintings, to establish a setting, convey a portrait subject's social status, or sometimes just enliven a scene. Together these details-so easy to overlook in the imposing harmony of draftsmanship, color, and composition that makes up a great painting-form a veritable history of ornament.

This inventive book plucks these decorative motifs from the background of paintings by masters like Bronzino, Fra Angelico, and Jacques-Louis David and transforms them into vibrant two-dimensional patterns. Seeing these patterns side-by-side with the original paintings deepens our appreciation of both. Pattern in Painting will be a resource for graphic designers, and a revelation for all art lovers.

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The Pre-Raphaelites

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Meet the renegades of Victorian art in this gorgeously illustrated exploration of their work and influence
 
In the revolutionary year of 1848, a group of young British artists set out to return a lost vibrancy to European art. Calling themselves the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, they mounted an artistic front against what they saw as the confining standards of the Victorian art world, and the dehumanizing aspects of the industrial age. Among their ranks were Dante Gabriel Rossetti, John Everett Millais, and William Hunt, who found followers in Edward Burne-Jones and William Morris. Their works drew from Shakespeare, Keats, and Tennyson. They also depicted religious and contemporary themes in striking realism, bringing viewers into intimate contact with the subjects and causing scandal in their time.

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How Artists See Animals

Second Edition

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One of the first two volumes in a relaunch of the best-selling series that encourages children to learn about the world by looking at art, and about art by looking at the world
 
How Artists See is a series of interactive, inquiry-based books designed to teach children the art of observation and increase their visual literacy. Each volume presents eighteen diverse works of art, all devoted to a subject that children know from personal experience. Author Colleen Carroll’s friendly, conversational text is filled with thought-provoking questions that promote exploration, self-expression, and fun.
 
In this revised and redesigned edition of the classic How Artists See Animals, more than half the artworks are newly selected—and they range from contemporary street art to an ancient Greek coin. Children will discover how Andy Warhol’s rhinoceros resembles a prehistoric cave painting, how Frank Gehry turned a fish’s sleek aquatic shape into architecture, and how Georgia O’Keefe captured a bird in flight using just a few curving lines.

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Greek and Roman Mosaics

Centurion Edition

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The best-illustrated survey of a spectacular ancient art, now available in an affordable edition
 
Mosaic has been called “painting for eternity,” and it is in fact one of the few arts of antiquity to survive in something like its original condition and variety. Mosaic pavements with geometric and figural motifs first appeared in Greece at the end of the fifth century BC and subsequently spread throughout the classical world, from the palaces of emperors and kings to even relatively modest private homes. Across the Mediterranean, local workshops cultivated many distinctive regional styles, while traveling teams of Hellenistic craftsmen produced figural mosaics of stunning refinement, often modeled after famous paintings; indeed, their work constitutes one of our only records of classical Greek painting, which has been almost entirely lost.
 
The styles and techniques of the ancient mosaicist’s art are given a concise yet authoritative exposition in the first part of this handsome volume. The second, and larger, part conducts the reader on a chronologically ordered tour of the most important centers of the art form’s development, from the Macedonian capital of Pella, whose compositions in natural pebbles set a high artistic standard for mosaics at the beginning of their history, to the Basilica of San Vitale at Ravenna, whose wall and vault mosaics, with their glittering vision of a triumphant Christianity, mark the transition between antiquity and the Middle Ages. Special attention is given to Pompeii and its surroundings, where the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD 79 preserved intact an astonishing variety of mosaics, including such ambitious figural scenes as the famous Alexander Mosaic, composed of some four million miniscule tesserae, as well as characteristically Roman pavements in black and white, and the brightly colored wall mosaics of garden grottoes.
 
Featuring more than 230 vibrant photographs, many newly commissioned, Greek and Roman Mosaics is the first survey of its subject to be illustrated in full color. It will be an essential visual reference for every student of classical antiquity, and a source of considerable delight for art lovers.

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My Adventures as an Illustrator

The Definitive Edition

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The life of America’s most beloved artist, in his own words—back in print with restored text and drawings, new illustrations, and more
 
The wit, humanity, and many-sided talent of Norman Rockwell (1894–1978) are on full display in his classic autobiography. Rockwell’s New York City boyhood, his apprentice days at the Art Students League, his first fateful visit to the Saturday Evening Post, his adventures abroad, his move to rural Vermont—all are recounted with a mix of sharp observation and self-deprecating humor. Throughout Rockwell invites the reader into his artistic process: he introduces his favorite models, candidly reveals his biggest flops, and documents the creation of a Post cover step by step.
 
This Definitive Edition restores the original 1960 text of My Adventures as an Illustrator, as well as the playful vignettes that Rockwell drew to head each chapter. Thanks to a massive image digitization effort undertaken by the Norman Rockwell Museum, it is also illustrated with more than 150 of Rockwell’s paintings and drawings, many of which highlight lesser-known aspects of his work. A new introduction by the artist’s granddaughter Abigail Rockwell adds reference value, as do an illustrated chronology and an annotated bibliography prepared by the staff of the Norman Rockwell Museum.
 
This attractive volume will be the essential source on the life of Norman Rockwell, and delightful reading for anyone who enjoys his art. Plus, its publication coincides with a major new exhibition at the Norman Rockwell Museum concerning the autobiographical elements in the artist’s work (Norman Rockwell: Private Moments for the Masses, June 8 through October 27, 2019).

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Painting the Dream

From the Biblical Dream to Surrealism

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The first-ever history of the representation of dreams in Western painting, illustrated with works by more than 130 artist.

Organized by period, from the Middle Ages to the present, this engaging book shows how the idea of the dream, andits depictions, have shifted throughout history, from th e biblical dream—a communication from God—to the deeply personal dream, the lighthearted fantasy, the nightmare.

Sometimes these ideas have existed simultaneously: thus we have, only a few years apart, Raphael’s limpid High Renaissance composition of Jacob dreaming his Ladder; Albrecht Dürer’s watercolor of a mysterious deluge that he saw in his own slumbers; and Hieronymus Bosch’s nightmarish hellscapes.

More recently, movements such as Symbolism and Surrealism have taken the dream as a primary source of inspiration, even conflating dreaming and the creative process itself. This rich vein of visionary art runs from Gustave Moreau and Odilon Redon, through De Chirico and Dalí, down to the present—demonstrating, as Bergez reminds us, that Morpheus was a god of form as well as of dreams.

Daniel Bergez is a scholar, curator, and critic whose work focuses on the relationship between painting and literature. His monograph on Nobel laureate Gao Xingjian won the Prix Bernier of the Académie des Beaux-Arts.

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The Art of Tarot

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A palm-sized visual history of tarot cards, from hand- painted Renaissance decks to the creations of modern artists like Salvador Dali.

Originally used by northern Italian aristocrats in complex games resembling bridge, tarot cards became more popular with the spread of printing in the sixteenth century and were eventually used by Freemasons, fortune-tellers, and mystics to reveal hidden truths about the past, present, and future. More recently, artists have used the imagery and potency of tarot as a springboard for creativity.

As a path to revelation or simply as a pastime, tarot is fascinating. A carefully curated selection of decks from the past six centuries—showing the chief turning points in their development—make this little book an indispensable guide to the history of tarot.

Christina Olsen, an art historian and museum director, wrote her PhD thesis on the history of tarot cards.

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