Art and Design

Painting the Dream

From the Biblical Dream to Surrealism

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The first-ever history of the representation of dreams in Western painting, illustrated with works by more than 130 artist.

Organized by period, from the Middle Ages to the present, this engaging book shows how the idea of the dream, andits depictions, have shifted throughout history, from th e biblical dream—a communication from God—to the deeply personal dream, the lighthearted fantasy, the nightmare.

Sometimes these ideas have existed simultaneously: thus we have, only a few years apart, Raphael’s limpid High Renaissance composition of Jacob dreaming his Ladder; Albrecht Dürer’s watercolor of a mysterious deluge that he saw in his own slumbers; and Hieronymus Bosch’s nightmarish hellscapes.

More recently, movements such as Symbolism and Surrealism have taken the dream as a primary source of inspiration, even conflating dreaming and the creative process itself. This rich vein of visionary art runs from Gustave Moreau and Odilon Redon, through De Chirico and Dalí, down to the present—demonstrating, as Bergez reminds us, that Morpheus was a god of form as well as of dreams.

Daniel Bergez is a scholar, curator, and critic whose work focuses on the relationship between painting and literature. His monograph on Nobel laureate Gao Xingjian won the Prix Bernier of the Académie des Beaux-Arts.

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The Art of Tarot

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A palm-sized visual history of tarot cards, from hand- painted Renaissance decks to the creations of modern artists like Salvador Dali.

Originally used by northern Italian aristocrats in complex games resembling bridge, tarot cards became more popular with the spread of printing in the sixteenth century and were eventually used by Freemasons, fortune-tellers, and mystics to reveal hidden truths about the past, present, and future. More recently, artists have used the imagery and potency of tarot as a springboard for creativity.

As a path to revelation or simply as a pastime, tarot is fascinating. A carefully curated selection of decks from the past six centuries—showing the chief turning points in their development—make this little book an indispensable guide to the history of tarot.

Christina Olsen, an art historian and museum director, wrote her PhD thesis on the history of tarot cards.

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Women Who Write are Dangerous

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A sequel to the best-selling Women Who Read Are Dangerous, presenting portraits and profiles of fearless women writers past and present.

Writing has not always been considered a suitable career for women. Indeed, it was once common for women authors to adopt a masculine pseudonym in order to be taken seriously. And even today, some women writers still struggle to obtain the same recognition that is given to their male counterparts. Nevertheless, women throughout the ages have overcome these obstacles to create literature of enduring importance.

This attractive book brings together paintings, drawings, prints, and photographs of some fifty outstanding women authors, from Mary Wollstonecraft, Jane Austen, and George Sand to Dorothy Parker, Simone de Beauvoir, and Toni Morrison. Each image is accompanied by an engaging commentary on the writer depicted, discussing the highlights of her career and the major themes of her work. Full of insight and inspiration, this is the perfect gift for any woman who writes.

Stefan Bollmann is the author of several books, including the best-selling Women Who Read Are Dangerous.

Francine Prose, prolific novelist and essayist, is past president of the PEN America Center.

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The Grand Medieval Bestiary

Dragonet Edition

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Now in an affordable edition, a splendid pageant of the animal kingdom as the Middle Ages saw it.

As the 587 colorful images in this magnificent volume reveal, animals were a constant—and delightful—presence in illuminated manuscripts throughout the Middle Ages. They were illustrated not only in bestiaries—the compendiums of animal fact and fable that were exceedingly popular in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries—but in every sort of manuscript, sacred and profane, from the Gospels to the Romance of the Rose.

This book is arranged in manner of a proper bestiary, with essays on the medieval lore and iconography of one hundred creatures alphabetized by their Latin names, from the alauda, or lark, whose morning song was thought to be a hymn to Creation, to the vultur, whose taste for carrion made it a symbol of the sinner who indulges in worldly pleasures. The selection includes a number of creatures that would now be considered fantastic, including the griffin, the manticore, and of course the fabled unicorn.

Christian Heck, professor of art history at the University of Lille, is an authority on illuminated manuscripts.

Rémy Cordonnier, who holds a doctorate in art history, is head of the cultural heritage department of the library of Saint-Omer, France.

 

PRAISE FOR THE GRAND MIDIEVAL BESTIARY

 

This is a huge and beautiful book that feels almost like a trip to the Cloisters between two covers. —New York Daily News

 

 
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Treasures of the Art Institute of Chicago

Paintings from the 19th Century to the Present

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A world-class collection of paintings, in the palm of your hand.

The Art Institute of Chicago houses some of the most celebrated paintings from the nineteenth century to the present: Georges Seurat’s A Sunday on La Grande Jatte, Grant Wood’s American Gothic, Edward Hopper’s Nighthawks.

These and nearly three hundred other masterpieces, from Delacroix and Ingres to Takashi Murakami and Kerry James Marshall, are illustrated in a vibrant new edition of this best-selling Tiny Folio. It has been completely revised and updated to bring it up to the present day, and to reveal the full international scope of the Art Institute’s painting collection.

This charming little volume is at once the perfect memento of a visit to the Windy City, and a pocket-sized survey of the styles and subjects of the last two-plus centuries of painting, from Neoclassicism and Romanticism to the pluralistic practices of today’s global art world.

James Rondeau is President and Director of the Art Institute of Chicago.

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Enduring Ideals

Rockwell, Roosevelt, and the Four Freedoms

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 A landmark volume placing Norman Rockwell’s Four Freedoms in their historical and artistic context.

Franklin Delano Roosevelt closed his 1941 State of the Union address with a vision of a world founded upon four human values: Freedom of Speech, Freedom of Worship, Freedom from Want, and Freedom from Fear. By 1943, America had entered World War II, and inspired to do his part, Norman Rockwell painted a series of four paintings based on these Freedoms.

Rockwell’s innately American interpretations of the Freedoms found a familiar home at The Saturday Evening Post, where they proved overwhelmingly popular. The U.S. government put the works on tour, and they helped raise $133 million for the war effort.

Enduring Ideals reveals the complex and sometimes unexpected story behind FDR’s Freedoms and the role
of Rockwell’s paintings—on tour for the first time in a generation—in illuminating them. In doing so, it brings together other works, by Rockwell and his contemporaries—such as Ben Shahn, Dorothea Lange, and Gordon Parks—along with analysis and commentary by art historians and others, including activist Ruby Bridges, artist Daisy Rockwell, and Ambassador William vanden Heuvel.

Stephanie Haboush Plunkett is Deputy Director/Chief Curator, Norman Rockwell Museum.

James J. Kimble, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Communication & the Arts, Seton Hall University.

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Zao Wou-Ki

1935-2010

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The most complete monograph on one of the world’s greatest contemporary painters.

Raised in Shanghai, Zao Wou-Ki (1920–2013) rose to prominence in his adopted France, and was one of the world’s most celebrated artists at the time of his death. Trained in both Western and Chinese painting, Zao’s work transcended both.

“I wanted to paint di erently,” Zao Wou-Ki wrote about his decision to leave China in 1948, and shortly after he landed in Paris, his work took on in uences of Henri Matisse and Paul Klee. As he moved beyond the West for inspiration, Zao gradually moved beyond China, too, employing abstraction; enormous, multi-panel canvases; and bright colors that recall J. M. W. Turner or Franz Kline.

Prepared in cooperation with the artist’s estate, Zao Wou-Ki: 1935–2010 includes excellent color reproductions of more than three hundred works, as well as a biocritical essay, detailed notes on key works, a critical anthology, and an illustrated chronology.

 

Dominique de Villepin is a writer of non ction and poetry. He served as prime minister of France from 2005 to 2007.

Yann Hendgen is a curator and the artistic director of the Zao Wou-Ki Foundation.

Françoise Marquet is the artist’s widow and was a curator at the Musée d'art moderne de la Ville de Paris.

 

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Ansel Adams (Expanded Edition)

The National Park Service Photographs

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A selection of Ansel Adams' breathtaking images, remastered to celebrate over 100 years of The National Park Service.

Ansel Adams was hired by the United States Department of the Interior to photograph America's national parks, producing this group of breathtaking images.

In 1941, Ansel Adams photographed America's national parks for a series of murals that would celebrate the country's natural heritage. Because of the escalation of World War II, the project was suspended after less than a year, but not before Adams had produced these images, which illustrate both his early innovations and the shape of his later, legendary career as America's foremost landscape photographer.

The invitation to photograph the nation's parklands was the perfect assignment for Adams, as it allowed him to express his deepest convictions as artist, conservationist, and citizen. These stunning photographs of the natural geysers and terraces in Yellowstone, the rocks and ravines in the Grand Canyon, the winding rivers and majestic mountains in Glacier and Grand Teton national parks, the mysterious Carlsbad Caverns, the architecture of ancient Indian villages, and many other evocative views of the American West demonstrate the genius of Adams' technical and aesthetic inventiveness.

In these glorious, seminal images we see the inspired reverence for the wilderness that has made Ansel Adams' work an enduring influence on environmentalism as well as art.

Ansel Adams (1902–1984) was one of the most prolific and highly acclaimed photographers of the twentieth century, and the author of dozens of publications. He helped establish the department of photography at New York’s Museum of Modern Art and founded the Friends of Photography in Carmel, California, and the Center for Creative Photography at the University of Arizona in Tucson. A member of the board of directors of the Sierra Club for thirty-seven years, Adams was instrumental in the growth of the American conservationist movement.

Alice Gray is a writer and editor based in Louisville, Kentucky. Her work has appeared in such publications as Art & Auction and Art News.

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Norman Rockwell's A Day in the Life of a Boy

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A day in the life of an American boy, illustrated with Norman Rockwell's iconic illustrations of life

A boy wakes up beside his beloved pet mutt for just another ordinary school day, but some surprises lie ahead! Here is one of Norman Rockwell’s most popular works, paired with a rhyming text that’s perfect for reading aloud or sharing with a grown-up. In classic Rockwell fashion, the almost two dozen pictures will elicit wry smiles of recognition, from young and old, at childhood’s everyday pleasures. At the back of the book is a short biography of Rockwell, as well as a note by Chuck Marsh, who, as a young boy more than sixty-five years ago, posed for the unforgettable series of pictures.

Norman Rockwell is America’s best-known, best-loved illustrator. While still in his teens, he was hired as art director of Boy's Life, the official publication of the Boy Scouts of America. Eventually he produced work for such magazines as Life, Look, and The Saturday Evening Post, for which he eventually produced 322 covers. In 1977, the artist received the nation’s highest civilian honor, the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Will Lach has written many children’s books about art, music, and natural history. He lives in Brooklyn with his family.

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Norman Rockwell's A Day in the Life of a Girl

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A day in the life of an American girl, illustrated with Normal Rockwell's iconic images of life.

A girl wakes up and tidies her braids before just another ordinary summer day, but some surprises lie ahead! Here is one of Norman Rockwell’s most popular works, paired with a rhyming text that’s perfect for reading aloud or sharing with a grown-up. In classic Rockwell fashion, the almost two dozen pictures will elicit wry smiles of recognition, from young and old, at childhood’s everyday pleasures. At the back of the book is a short biography of Rockwell, as well as a note by Mary Whalen Leonard, who, as a young girl more than sixty-five years ago, posed for the charming series of pictures

Norman Rockwell is America’s best-known, best-loved illustrator. While still in his teens, he was hired as art director of Boy's Life, the official publication of the Boy Scouts of America. Eventually he produced work for such magazines as Life, Look, and The Saturday Evening Post, for which he eventually produced 322 covers. In 1977, the artist received the nation’s highest civilian honor, the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

Will Lach has written many children’s books about art, music, and natural history. He lives in Brooklyn with his family.

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Women Walking

Freedom, Adventure, Independence

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This elegant survey of more than 60 works of art chronicles the nascent liberation when women began to walk freely by themselves in public.

At the close of the eighteenth century, women began to discover a new sense of freedom, adventure, and self-determination, simply by walking in public unaccompanied. Previously, solitary walks by women were considered unseemly. An unaccompanied hike in the country was beyond imagination; to promenade by oneself on city boulevards was unthinkable.

This book features evocative paintings of women doing just that, by a range of artists, from the late eighteenth to the early twentieth century, among them British portraitist Thomas Gainsborough, the scandalous Gustave Courbet, Impressionist Gustave Caillebotte, American masters Winslow Homer and John Singer Sargent, and Nabi artist Félix Vallotton.

With paintings act her guide, Karin Sagner takes us on a visual journey through this vital yet oft-overlooked aspect of women’s emancipation, from the promenades of the nobility to everyday walks in the city, on gentle strolls in the country or hikes up mountain summits. Quotes by luminaries like the Marquise de Sévigné, Jane Austen, and Simone de Beauvoir gracefully support her points.

A thoughtful gift for graduates, teachers, or Mother’s Day, this subtle but profound book is not only an illuminating history but a beautiful art historical survey and an inspirational guide.

Karin Sagner is an art historian, writer, and curator. She has worked at the Bavarian State Paintings Collections in Munich and has published several books on French and German art of the 19th and 20th centuries. Her previous titles include Beautiful Women and Renoir and His Women (2012), both published in German by Elisabeth Sandmann Verlag.

 

PRAISE FOR WOMEN WALKING

Women Walking is a work of art, the stunning paintings nothing short of intoxicating. The history of women for the first time finding freedom, by walking the countryside and grand parks of Europe―not to mention climbing the treacherous peaks of Mont Blanc in entirely impractical clothing―is both captivating and entirely timely, given today’s growing walking trends.” ―Diana Nyad, the first person to swim from Cuba to Florida, a story captured in her memoir Find a Way. Nyad has also launched a the national walking initiative EverWalk.com.

“A beautiful compendium of moments when women have seized their independence and set out on foot. Even where they've been captured by male artists, you can see the glint in their eyes: so this is freedom.” ―Lauren Elkin, author of Flâneuse: Women Walk the City

"This richly illustrated volume offers an engaging social history of women and recreational walking with a focus on nineteenth-century Europe. Author Karin Sanger takes us along nature walks, mountain hikes, and strolls through different European capitals, as captured by a wide range of artists from the period, supplemented with excerpts from novels and other contemporary sources.” ―Kathryn Calley Galitz, author of The Metropolitan Museum of Art: Masterpiece Paintings

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Treasures of the Brooklyn Museum

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Highlights from Brooklyn's world-renowned encyclopedic art museum.


The Brooklyn Museum is one of the oldest and largest art museums in the United States. Located in New York City’s most populous borough, the museum’s 560,000-square-foot building is a Beaux-Arts masterpiece, housing major collections ranging from ancient Assyrian reliefs to striking period homes and Old Master paintings, along with Native American, African, and Asian art, and works by top contemporary artists. This handsome little book illustrates a curated selection of its masterpieces, including highlights of the museum’s renowned ancient Egyptian collection, its expansive holdings in American art, and its Sackler Center for contemporary feminist art, including Judy Chicago’s The Dinner Party. The perfect souvenir from the museum’s shop, or for any visitor to the borough, this Tiny Folio features spectacular photography throughout, as well as a special selection of images highlighting Brooklyn’s rich artistic history.

Kevin L. Stayton is Curator Emeritus of the Brooklyn Museum.

Anne Pasternak is the Shelby White and Leon Levy Director of the Brooklyn Museum.

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Treasures of the New-York Historical Society

Highlights of New York history and culture from the collection of one of the Big Apple's most treasured museums.

Founded in 1804, the New-York Historical Society is New York City’s oldest museum, with a rich history of scholarship, research, and illuminating exhibitions. The museum collection of the New-York Historical Society comprises more than 1.6 million works of art, featuring an impressive collection of Tiffany lamps, paintings by celebrated American portraitists, all the known preparatory watercolors for John James Audubon’s Birds of America, and exquisite works by artists of the Hudson River School—including Thomas Cole’s monumental series The Course of Empire.

The Library is internationally known as a major research venue for the study of American and New York history. Its rich collections include more than 5 million manuscript items, 350,000 books, and several million photographs, prints, architectural renderings, and related holdings. The Library’s vast holdings of printed ephemera documenting daily life, culture, commerce, and politics from the eighteenth through the earlier twentieth centuries are unrivaled. The collections provide a continuous record of New York and American history from the founding of New Amsterdam through the tragic events of 9/11. The Library’s deepest areas of original source material include the Colonial and Revolutionary eras, the Early Republic, the Civil War, and the Gilded Age, with emphases on slavery and Abolition, temperance, social welfare, urban life, and architecture.

Now celebrating a groundbreaking renovation and the dedication of its Center for the Study of Women’s History, the Museum and Library present highlights from their remarkable holdings, from the folk art collection of sculptor Elie Nadelman to iconic ephemera from all eras of American history, for the first time as a Tiny Folio. An ideal souvenir for the New-York Historical Society’s visitors, this charming volume also features a special section of works depicting the city itself, alongside full-color photography and short introductory texts.

Louise Mirrer, PhD, is President and Chief Executive Officer of the New-York Historical Society.

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Karen Gunderson

The Dark World of Light

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The first comprehensive monograph on contemporary artist Karen Gunderson written by Pulitzer Prize winner Elizabeth Frank.

Widely collected in Hollywood and New York, artist Karen Gunderson is perhaps best known for her work since the 1980s, when she transitioned from painting in color to working only in black. Over her forty-plus-year career, Gunderson has tackled subjects from clouds to royalty to the cosmos. Her long-developed, labor intensive technique, including rigorous brushwork and paint layering, employs a range of black shades that create a unique three-dimensional effect: The multiple textures from the paint catch light and make the paintings shimmer and appear to move, alternating with shadows and highlights that illuminate her subjects—historic royal figures, bodies of water, mountains, and constellations—depending on how the viewer moves in front of each artwork.

Tracing the life and career of the artist, Karen Gunderson is written by author and critic Elizabeth Frank, who won the Pulitzer Prize for her biography of poet Louise Bogan and is the author of a number of books on art, including Jackson Pollock, published by Abbeville.

Art lovers and artists interested in Gunderson’s painting technique will discover captivating works in this book—in more than 100 illustrations—that shows how the artist pushes the limits to what one can do with black paint. While abstract artists of the past, including Ad Reinhardt and Pierre Soulages, have employed black paint, Gunderson has set herself apart from this lineage. She has distinguished herself not only with her use of figurative subjects, but also the way her works radiate a quiet optimism—a sharp contrast with this dark medium.

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Giotto

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The definitive monograph on the greatest painter of the early Renaissance, now available in an affordable paperback edition

Giotto is traditionally considered a founder of the Italian Renaissance, praised for his understanding of space and the human body. Producing a series of commissioned works for the church and upper classes in his native Tuscany and surrounding regions, Giotto (c. 1267–1337) changed the course of European art by breaking away from the stiff, predictable figures of the Byzantine and medieval traditions. His great fresco cycles, most notably the lives of the Virgin and Christ in the Scrovegni (or Arena) Chapel, Padua, are filled with realistic depictions of three-dimensional figures set in dramatic, even revolutionary, perspectival spaces.

In this authoritative survey of Giotto's life and work, Francesca Flores d'Arcais draws on a broad range of sources, from fourteenth-century documents to recent art-historical investigations. Her research leads her to important reattributions of Giottesque paintings and to new conclusions regarding the execution and dating of both famous and lesser-known works. In this second edition of her study, d'Arcais also discusses the earthquake of September 26, 1997, that damaged the frescoes of the Upper Basilica of San Francisco in Assisi, some of which are attributed to the young Giotto. Now available in a paperback edition at an irresistible price, Giotto combines splendid images and d'Arcais's insightful text in the definitive monograph on the greatest of trecento masters.

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Currier & Ives’ America

From a Young Nation to a Great Power

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The best-selling collection of Currier & Ives Americana, now available at an unbeatable price

In the 1800s—long before the days of photojournalism and cable news—vibrant, contemporary depictions of news events, portraits of prominent political and social figures, and scenic views of the American wilderness were circulated throughout the growing nation. From the beginning of the exciting century that saw a small nation expand into a mighty world power, the famous lithographic firm of Nathaniel Currier and James Merritt Ives produced over 7,000 prints, capturing scenes of American life in vivid detail.

Currier & Ives prints were each colored individually, by hand, and collectors have prized their skilled craftsmanship and keen sense of composition for generations. This timeless collection, complete with more than three hundred illustrations in full color and a masterful text by historian Walton Rawls, captures a beloved piece of Americana. With festive holiday scenes, watershed historical moments, and idyllic depictions of the American countryside, this book will hold perennial appeal for lovers of history, art, and a classic take on the American experience.

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Bali

Sustainable Visions

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Discover how visionary architects and designers are pioneering a new, environmentally sustainable style of tropical living

Justly famous for its artistic expressions, Balinese culture is also uniquely adapted to the natural conditions of this small volcanic island just a few degrees south of the equator. The subak system, maintained cooperatively for more than a millennium, channels fresh water from high in the mountains to the terraced rice fields below. And the vernacular architecture, made from renewable materials like wood and bamboo, is designed to accommodate the indoor-outdoor tropical lifestyle—and to withstand the extremes of tropical weather.

Today, even as Bali's ecosystem is challenged by a continued influx of foreign tourists, a handful of inspired creators are rediscovering the island's long tradition of environmental sustainability. This gorgeous and eye-opening volume introduces us to their most innovative projects on Bali and other islands, including luxurious private homes built from traditional and reclaimed materials; the Suarga Resort, which boasts the world's largest bamboo-shingled roof; and the Green School, an international primary and secondary school where students learn to be stewards of the earth.

Illustrated throughout with stunning new color photographs and animated by a deep ecological consciousness, Bali: Sustainable Visions is an essential book for everyone who cares about the future of architecture, design, and the natural environment.

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The Art of the Pastel

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The only comprehensive history of pastel art, beautifully illustrated with works both celebrated and little known

The Art of the Pastel traces the evolution of this most appealing medium from the fifteenth to the early twentieth century—from its humble origins as a tool for sketching to the height of its popularity in Rococo portraiture, and its embrace by the Impressionists and Symbolists. Authors Thea Burns and Philippe Saunier, both leading experts on the subject, shed new light on the acknowledged masters of the pastel, such as Maurice Quentin de la Tour and Jean-Etienne Liotard, who used these magical sticks of color to capture the character of their sitters; Edgar Degas and Mary Cassat, who used them to reveal the unexpected beauties of the everyday; and Odilon Redon, who used them to explore the inner mysteries of the spirit. But Burns and Saunier consider the pastel work of many other artists as well, from forgotten—yet pleasing—society portraitists to such important names as Delacroix, Whistler, and Picasso.

As a rare achievement, their graceful yet authoritative text is matched by the color plates in this volume, which reproduce the harmoniously blended hues of more than 330 choice pastels, from collections around the world. For reasons of conservation, most of these works are exhibited only rarely, and then only in low light. Now they can be admired all together, without interruption, in this museum between two covers.

A delight for the eyes as well as an important work of art history, The Art of the Pastel will be eagerly welcomed by artists, scholars, and art lovers alike.

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