Art and Design

Travels with Van Gogh and the Impressionists

Discovering the Connections

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A captivating memoir of the author’s journey through France in search of the Impressionists and their art, interwoven with personal histories of the artists and illuminated with contemporary photographs that re-create and reimagine their work.

In 2000, deeply shaken by her husband’s recent death, author and world traveler Lin Arison took a trip through France with her granddaughter Sarah. Though Arison was in mourning, and Sarah was initially skeptical about art, the two surprised themselves by discovering renewed joy in the work of the Impressionists and the settings that inspired them.

In the years that followed, Arison’s personal odyssey became an extraordinary collaboration with photographer Neil Folberg, a collaboration culminating in Travels with Van Gogh and the Impressionists: Discovering the Connections. In one unique volume, Arison ushers readers from Auvers to Arles, Giverny to Mont Sainte- Victoire, in her quest to rediscover the lives, dwellings, and paintings of the Impressionists. En route, she debunks long-held myths about Van Gogh and Berthe Morisot, befriends twenty-first-century descendants of some of the masters, and finds inspiration in the Impressionists’ mutually supportive relationships. Gracefully blending memoir, travelogue, art history, and biography, Arison’s intimate narrative brings new insight to our understanding of these artists and their legacy.

Interspersed with Arison’s text, and with handsome reproductions of the original masterpieces, Neil Folberg’s photographs capture the central spirit of the Impressionists’ work and reapply that spirit to contemporary subjects and settings. Following an intuitive sensibility that never misses its mark, Folberg deploys each artist’s individual vision to new and striking ends, undergoing an artistic transformation of his own in the process.

Together, Arison’s words and Folberg’s images explore the enduring impact of France’s great late nineteenth-century painters, and the ways in which their revolutionary visions of their own world still impart great meaning and beauty to ours.

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Andrea Palladio

The Architect in His Time (2nd Edition)

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A comprehensive handbook exploring the career of the architect who transformed the building design and construction of the Western world.

Andrea Palladio (1508–1580) is known as the architect who has guided Western design philosophy for half a millennium, creating forms that have been studied and reproduced from age to age and around the world. For architects and the public alike, his buildings have become enduring testaments to his architectural genius as creator of a timeless classicism. When Abbeville Press first published Andrea Palladio: The Architect in His Time in 1994, it was selected by Choice magazine as “Outstanding Academic Book 1994,” while The World of Interiors called it “undoubtedly one of the most important architectural books to be published for some time.” Now Abbeville is pleased to release the revised concise edition of this essential resource.

Featuring a newly updated bibliography, this handsome volume spans the entire career of Palladio, illuminating his work in the context of his historical era and his own extraordinary life. It invites us to view Palladio’s masterpieces through the lens of Paolo Marton, moving across the thresholds of myriad villas, churches, and public edifices to illustrate the elegant proportions, crisp lines, and integrated geometries that are the hallmarks of Palladio’s vision. From the immortal Villa Rotonda to the Venetian churches of the Redentore and San Giorgio Maggiore, from the city halls to the bridges, each masterpiece is described using plans, maps, and contemporary drawings and etchings along with brilliant photography.

Combining modern scholarship with intriguing narrative, Palladio will educate and enlighten, helping readers understand the passion, joy, and beauty of one of the world’s most fascinating ages of architecture.

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The History of Venice in Painting

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This magnificent, oversized, luxuriously illustrated volume presents the wondrous history of Venice, as revealed by its artistic legacy.

Venice is a magical city. For centuries, Venice has enchanted visitors with its magnificent architecture and romantic canals. As a lone republic amid mostly monarchical Europe, Venice equally amazed philosophers and poets, leading Wordsworth to hail this floating city of more than one hundred islands as “the oldest Child of Liberty.”

Yet it is the imprint Venice left in the realm of painting, not only as a subject that inspired visiting artists from Europe and beyond, but more importantly as the seat of a new school of painting, for which Venice should best be remembered. The Venetian School of painting was developed during the Renaissance, featuring such celebrated painters as Bellini, Mantegna, Giorgione, and Titian. Emphasizing Venice’s pervasive sunlight and glowing color in their works, these painters influenced centuries of painters to come. The authors of The History of Venice in Painting explain how the Venetian School, in addition to other attractions like Carnival, attracted legions of tourists to Venice, making it an obligatory stop on the “Grand Tour” that should complete any eighteenth-century gentleman’s cultural education. Visitors also came to Venice to paint the city’s famous light for themselves, most notably J.M.W. Turner and Claude Monet. Sun-soaked Venice, with light reflecting off the waters of its many canals, was indeed an Impressionist’s dream.

This vibrantly illustrated text traces the history of the Republic of Venice through its artistic heritage, from medieval mosaics to twentieth-century Futurist paintings. Including 350 full-color images, as well as 4 breathtaking gatefolds, The History of Venice in Painting is a treasure-trove of art, history, and culture. Here such panoramas as religious processions and gondolas criss-crossing the Grand Canal are displayed in a size befitting the subject’s grandeur. Protected in a silkbound slipcase, this gorgeous tribute captures the history and indelible legacy of Venice.

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New Bar and Club Design

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A sophisticated, contemporary survey of fifty of the world’s newest and most stylish bars and clubs.

The sequel to the highly successful and critically praised book, Bar and Club Design, New Bar and Club Design is an elegant photographic journey through the latest international design trends in the bar and club industries, highlighting bars and clubs completed since 2001.

There has been a resurgence of cocktail culture and an explosion of the “style bar,” places that are professionally designed and serve high quality spirits, wine, and cocktails. Such bars have continued to open in cities such as New York, London, and Tokyo, but also in Beirut and Bangkok. Another strong trend in bar and club design, documented here, is a interest in creating lower budget designer bars that are as visually interesting and unusually designed as the big budget productions, such as Andy Wahloo in Paris and Loungelover in London. Likewise, club culture continues to thrive, albeit on a far smaller scale than the superclubs of the 1990s. Nightclubs have grown cozier, late night lounge bars have emerged to cater to the “grown-up clubber,” offering comfort and luxury rather than an empty shell in which to dance. The futuristic “superclubs” still being built now offer the very latest in technology and audiovisual entertainment.

This book explores the design zeitgeist of drinking and dancing culture worldwide. Divided by category into bars, restaurant bars, hotel bars, and clubs, each profile includes imaginative photographs, thoughtful descriptions, and architectural plans of the design. The innovative, sleek photographs allow the reader to enter into the ambience of each bar and experience its atmosphere. Sure to be an excellent guide for bar and club owners, architects and designers, as well as a sourcebook for new design inspirations, New Bar and Club Design will be appealing to travelers, night-lifers and design-lovers of every description.

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The Art and Architecture of Mesopotamia

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A richly illustrated survey of the artistic achievements of Mesopotamian culture from the Sumerians to the caliphs.

The artistic traditions of ancient Iraq, or Mesopotamia, are among the oldest in the world, for it was in this flat, fertile land between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers that the world’s first advanced civilization, that of the Sumerians, arose around 3000 BC. But the long history of Mesopotamian art was marked by change as much as continuity; the region was then as now a center of political conflict, and the Sumerians gave way to a succession of powers both indigenous and foreign, each of which left a cultural imprint.

This volume’s contributing authors, all art historians and archaeologists specializing in the ancient Near East, provide accessible and lively overviews of the successive phases of this eventful artistic saga. The first two chapters cover the “classic” age of the great Mesopotamian city-states, from the pre-Sumerian Ubaid culture to Alexander’s conquest of Babylon; the remains of this era range from the fabulous treasures of the royal cemeteries at Ur to the mighty ziggurats of Uruk and Babylon. The third chapter concerns the Greco-Mesopotamian art of the Hellenistic dynasty founded by Alexander’s general Seleucus; the ruins of Seleucia, his capital on the Tigris, cover some 1500 acres. The fourth chapter investigates the artistic contributions of the two Persian dynasties, the Parthian and the Sassanid, that dominated the region from the first century BC to the seventh century AD and established the soaring iwan, or vaulted portico, as one of its typical architectural forms. The final chapter is devoted to the area’s early Islamic period, during which the Abbasid caliphs (eighth to thirteenth century AD) made Iraq the center of the Islamic world, constructing splendid mosques in their capitals of Baghdad and Samarra and elaborating the fantastic arabesques that have never disappeared from Islamic decorative art.

The ancient masterpieces discussed in these chapters are depicted in 217 stunning illustrations, most of them full-color photographs, and appended to the main text is a unique visual guide to Iraq’s principal archaeological sites, which provides a further 247 black-and-white photographs. With its authoritative, up-to-date texts and this wealth of illustrations, The Art and Architecture of Mesopotamia is an essential publication for anyone with an interest in the cultural heritage of mankind.

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The Art and Architecture of Persia

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This vibrantly illustrated text offers detailed historical and cultural insight into the art and architecture of one of the oldest regions of the world.

The history of the area now known as Iran, but often still referred to as Persia, spans millennia, boasting a rich and complex artistic and cultural legacy. Populated since prehistoric times, thus making it one of the most dynamic areas of Islamic civilization, this region was home to the world’s first powerful empire (lead by Cyrus the Great during the Achaemenid dynasty) and has influenced the aesthetic grammar of a large portion of central Asia, including Armenia, Georgia, and India.

From the ancient Iranian civilizations in 500 BC, through the Islamic period, and on to modern-day Iran, Iran: The Art and Architecture of Persia explores the common characteristics and thematic threads running through Persian art. Iran presents its readers with archaeological landscapes, monuments, sculptures, carpets, and dazzling ornaments and art objects from this stunning artistic milieu. The text takes as it subject the most fascinating and unusual facets of the Persian artistic experience, with a particular focus on post-Hellenic culture, namely late antiquity and the Middle Ages. Iran investigates how the examined regions were hothouses of specific artistic developments and identifies how the Iranian passage along the Silk Route acted as a bridge between distant lands for trade as well as the dissemination of religious and material culture.

The two authors, Gianroberto Scarcia and Giovanni Curatola, write in an engaging, refreshingly accessible manner, catering both to specialists and to novices wishing to immerse themselves in this captivating region and its art. Author Scarcia writes the first part of the book, covering the era from the Achaemenids to the Sassanids and examining the great architecture from Persepolis onward while also addressing the powerful metalwork produced by these cultures. The second part, by Curatola, explores the Islamic period, when architectural decoration moved into the forefront with brilliant chromatic effects etched onto massive built works. The same colors bloom throughout the other arts, including carpets and miniature paintings. Dynamic and absorbing, Iran and its over 200 color photos will take readers on a virtual tour of this region and the art it has produced over the centuries.

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The Lure of Gold

An Artistic and Cultural History

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The dazzlingly illustrated story of how the world's most beautiful element has influenced the art, economy, and society of every civilization.

When Hesiod, the Greek poet of the eighth century B.C., recounted the history of the world as he understood it, he described the legendary first generation of mortal men, who lived in peace and ease, as the “people of gold.” Nearly three millennia later, we still refer to a particularly happy or prosperous era as a “golden age.” The reason Hesiod’s metaphor translates so perfectly into our own idiom is that the mystique of gold, the quintessential precious metal, is truly universal. The very scarcity of gold accounts for part of its allure and much of its monetary value: the total volume of gold ever mined, from prehistory to the present day, would probably fit inside a cube with sides just twenty yards (18 m) long. Yet gold’s incredible material properties also contribute to its appeal. Gold does not corrode, so it never loses its brilliant luster, and it can be chased, embossed, punched, drawn into wires, hammered foil-thin, and shaped in countless other ways.

This engaging book reveals that the ways in which gold, in turn, has shaped humanity are no less numerous. Since prehistory, for example, artisans have fashioned gold into ritual objects and high-status ornaments; beginning in the sixth century B.C., gold served as currency; and even in the modern era it has encouraged wars of conquest and triggered frantic gold rushes. Each chapter is devoted to one historical epoch, explaining how people of that time mined and refined gold, and how they used it for cultural and economic purposes. Two hundred gorgeous color photographs illustrate golden objets d’art as diverse as the funerary masks of Tutankhamen; intricate Celtic jewelry; a figurine of “El Dorado,” a pre-Columbian chief said to ritualistically cover his entire body in gold dust; bejeweled medieval reliquaries and crucifixes; and even Gustav Klimt’s gold-drenched canvas The Kiss. With its authoritative yet lively text and these arresting illustrations, The Lure of Gold sets, as it were, the gold standard for books on material culture.

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Hieronymus Bosch

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A stunningly illustrated, groundbreaking exploration of the work of the Low Countries' great visionary painter.

Four hundred little people frolic au naturel with overgrown songbirds and raspberries; a pudgy blue demon serenades a fashionable young couple with a tune piped through his own elongated nose; a knife-wielding set of disembodied ears stalks the damned through hell. The phantasmagoric imagery of Hieronymus Bosch (d. 1516) has been the source of widespread interest ever since the painter’s lifetime, and is still so enigmatic that scholars have theorized that it contains hidden astrological, alchemical, or even heretical meanings. Yet none of these theories has ever seemed to provide an adequate understanding of Bosch’s work. Moreover, the considerable professional success that the artist enjoyed in his native Hertogenbosch, not to mention his membership in a traditional religious organization, suggests that he pursued not a sinister secret agenda but simply his personal artistic vision.

This intriguing new monograph by noted art historian Larry Silver interprets that artistic vision with admirable lucidity: it explains how Bosch’s understanding of human sin, morality, and punishment, which was conceived in an era of powerful apocalyptic expectation, shaped his dramatic visualizations of hell and of the temptations of even the most steadfast saints. Silver’s account of Bosch’s artistic development is one of the first to benefit from recent technical investigations of the paintings, as well as from the reexamination of the artist’s drawings in relation to his paintings. Hieronymus Bosch is also unique in how securely it places its subject’s work in the broader history of painting in the Low Countries: Silver identifies sources of Bosch’s iconography in a wide range of fifteenth-century panel paintings, manuscript illuminations, and prints, and describes how, despite their own religiousness, Bosch’s pictures helped inspire the secular landscape and genre scenes of later Netherlandish painters. Augmented by 310 illustrations, most in color, including many dramatic close-ups of Bosch’s intricately imagined nightmare scenes, this is the definitive book on a perennially fascinating artist.

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Landscape Painting

A History

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A comprehensive, captivating history of landscape painting lavishly illustrated with 280 full-color works of art.

Since Antiquity, painters have sought to portray the glories of nature, and many of their pictures have become the best-known masterpieces in the history of art. In this sweeping treasury of Western art, distinguished art historian Nils Büttner has chosen paintings that not only portray natural vistas but also dramatic scenes with people and architecture. His broad selection of paintings in this genre consists mainly of well-known works, but some seldom-reproduced pictures are also included.

The paintings are presented chronologically, beginning with the heritage from the ancient world and the precursors of landscape artists in the Middle Ages and Renaissance, such as Leonardo da Vinci, Giovanni Bellini, and Raphael. The sixteenth century heralded a new perception of the world, reflected in the works of such masters as Albrecht Dürer and Bruegel, as shown. Next, artists of the flowering age of landscapes in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries are featured, including Claude Lorrain, Nicolas Poussin, Rubens, Rembrandt, Fragaonard, David, and Gainsborough. In the early nineteenth century, which was dominated by the spirit of Romanticism, artists began to display a new manner of treating nature. These revolutionary conceptions of nature are vividly presented with examples from Constable, Turner, Whistler, Frederic Church, Bierstadt, Thomas Eakins, and Winslow Homer. These artists are followed by plein-air painters, Impressionists, and Post-Impressionists, among them Manet, Monet, Sisley, Renoir, Cézanne, Seurat, van Gogh, and Rousseau. Artists represented from the twentieth century include Matisse, Picasso, Klee, Magritte, Georgia O’Keeffe, Andrew Wyeth, and David Hockney.

Many of the extraordinary works are reproduced in full along with a detail and an informative caption. In the authoritative text, the author traces the history of landscape painting up to the present day but also focuses on individual paintings and the circumstances under which they were created. Along with a description of a painting, the lucid text examines the work’s cultural, historical, and aesthetic context.

The art of landscape artists, which has long been an under-published area of art history, is finally and stunningly revealed in this richly illustrated tribute to their work. This fresh vision of landscape artists is certain to be welcomed by art historians and museum-goers, as well anyone else interested in Western art.

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The North American Indian Portfolios

From the Library of Congress

This miniature folio is based on the well-known frontier artwork by Bodmer, Catlin, and McKenney & Hall.

Based on the renowned frontier artwork of George Catlin’s North American Indian Portfolio, McKenney and Hall’s History of the Indian Tribes of North America, and Prince Maximilian’s Travels in the Interior of North America between 1832 and 1834, these historic collections of prints and paintings were the first to preserve images of Native Americans before their culture was affected by the white man. Fulfilling one of the Library of Congress’ central missions—to document the printed, visual, and written history of this country—the images in this volume constitute part of the archive of the American memory.

Native Americans found the world’s eyes upon them in the nineteenth century. Artists like George Catlin, Charles Bird King, and Karl Bodmer trekked to the West to paint images for those unable to make the journey and created some of the most important sociological, historical, and ethnological studies of American Indians. George Catlin, for example, was allowed to observe many of the ceremonies and games in the Indian villages which enabled him to provide a remarkably detailed picture of the tribe’s religious and social life. He wrote, “The history and customs of such a people, preserved by pictorial illustration, are themes worthy of the lifetime of one man.” This extraordinary miniature folio will appeal to anyone with an interest in American art, art history, or Native American history.

The miniature folio, published in associateion with The Library of Congress, features an introduction written by James Gilreath, the former American History Specialist for the Librarys Rare Book and Special Collections.

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Wood Houses

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A superbly illustrated survey profiling noteworthy new homes from around the world, all constructed from the architect's latest cutting-edge material — wood.

A superbly illustrated survey profiling noteworthy new homes from around the world, all constructed from the architect’s latest cutting-edge material—wood.

Contemporary architects have long overlooked the great versatility of wood as a building material. Now, however, they have begun to adopt wood as the natural solution to a variety of design problems, and as a result, this environmentally sustainable material is becoming increasingly significant in today’s domestic architecture.

Wood Houses, by noted architecture journalist Ruth Slavid, displays the entire breadth of this important architectural movement by covering forty-six recently built homes. The featured houses range from Fernau and Hartman Architects’ Mann Residence in Sonoma County, a timber-frame house with a strikingly decentralized plan, to 24H Architecture’s Arjang House in Värmland, Sweden, a reindeer fur-lined, cedar-shingled lakeside retreat. Each house’s profile is illustrated with not only the architect’s own plans and elevations but also numerous full-color interior and exterior photographs that highlight the intrinsic beauty of wood.

Slavid explores the background of the present wood-house renaissance in an introduction that covers topics as wide-ranging as timber-frame construction, the use of wood in an urban setting, and fire prevention. She goes on to illuminate significant trends in the field of wooden home design, such as timber’s popularity as a construction material for vacation homes and the evolution of deliberately austere aesthetics from wood’s innate qualities. Other topics include the liberation of wood from its familiar associations to serve as the basis of modern design and the current status of wood houses as part of a larger urban or suburban development. A helpful appendix features project credits and a glossary. This beautiful volume will serve as both a reference and an inspiration for anyone who designs, builds, or simply lives in wood houses.

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Design for Shopping

New Retail Interiors

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A strikingly illustrated exploration of today's most innovative and original retail interiors from around the world.

Retail design is quickly learning new ways to entice the customer. To create a unique and captivating shopping experience, shops use interactive technology and commission stunning works of art; fashion brands team up with celebrity architects to create brand strategies and generate publicity; and irony, humor, and playful elements of surprise turn into mainstays of retail interiors.

From the giant, breathing mannequins of Mandarina Duck in London to the high-tech dressing rooms of Prada in Los Angeles, Design for Shopping provides a detailed, behind-the-scenes examination of the sometimes jaw-dropping, sometimes whimsical, and always breathtakingly creative ways that today’s most exceptional shops appeal to the customer’s imagination.

Accompanied by architects’ floor plans and vivid color photographs, Design for Shopping showcases a comprehensive selection of recent retail interiors from around the world. Following an insightful introduction which examines the historical and sociological variables in current shopping culture, the book is divided into seven chapters which discuss themes such as the reinvention of old brands; technology and shopping; the emerging intersections between architecture, art, and fashion; play and shopping; new ways and places to shop; and how store design and branding have become intimately related to selling a lifestyle.

Fascinating case studies illustrate each of these themes, with thirty-five stores discussed in total. As a special feature, each chapter begins with an interview with a prominent figure in the world of retail design. Designers, architects, and retailers interviewed include Marcel Wanders, Hani Rashid, Amanda Levete, and Terence Conran.

The perceptive text, coupled with the gorgeous illustrations of the stores (shops presented include Gucci, New York; Helmut Lang, New York; Prada, Los Angeles; Armani, Hong Kong; Dior, Tokyo; Mandarina Duck, London; Fendi, Paris; Miss Sixty, Barcelona; Villa Moda, Kuwait City) makes this book a must-have for anyone interested in design, architecture, shopping, or culture.

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Radical Office Design

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A gorgeously illustrated worldwide survey of innovative workplace architecture that enhances the performance and well-being of today's professionals.

Traditional office work, characterized by repetitive clerical tasks, is rapidly giving way to “knowledge work,” characterized by the creative application and exchange of information. In response, architects around the world are leaving aside the old cubicle grid to design imaginative, high-tech offices that foster knowledge work and, at the same time, help workers balance the competing demands of colleagues, customers, and family. The forty-three exceptional workplaces profiled in this timely volume have all been completed within the last six years and serve a wide variety of organizations, both private and public, small and large. Examples range from the headquarters of an advertising firm where one enormous table seats all two hundred employees, facilitating communication, to a BMW plant where the factory production line runs through and above the administrative offices, unifying the corporate community.

The authors skillfully distinguish the primary trends in contemporary office design by dividing their engagingly written case studies among four chapters, each dedicated to a particular type of workplace. “Academies” encourage the sharing of knowledge within a corporate structure; “Guilds” allow the members of a profession to interact as peers; “Agoras” bring the workplace closer to the marketplace and to civic life; and “Lodges” combine the home and the office. Two hundred extraordinary color photographs and fifty architectural drawings show how the featured architects have configured public areas, meeting rooms, and private work spaces to meet the needs of today’s increasingly versatile and mobile workers.

The inclusion of an informative introduction, which outlines the economic and technological factors driving the rapid evolution of contemporary workplace architecture, further ensures that this attractive book will be an essential reference for everybody who has a hand in designing offices, and a thought-provoking read for everybody who works in one.

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Earthworks and Beyond

Contemporary Art in the Landscape

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4th Edition

Updated and expanded to incorporate the most recent land art projects, Earthworks and Beyond (first published in 1984; 2nd edition, 1989; 3rd edition, 1998) is a perceptive and accessible survey of an influential art movement that developed during the 1960s and is still reshaping both remote and urban landscapes.

This invaluable volume now includes the most recent efforts by artists—often in collaboration with architects and city planners—to transform ravaged landscapes and desolate cityscapes into pleasure-giving parks and artworks. The book begins with an enlightening introduction tracing the historical roots of art in the landscape: Stonehenge, Indian mounds, cliff dwellings, park design from 18th-century England to modern-day golf courses. The opening chapter deals with such innovative artists as Robert Smithson, Nancy Holt, Walter De Maria, and Christo, who in the 1960s began to free their art from the confines of tradition by constructing monumental sculptures in the environment. The following chapters discuss their predecessors, peers, and successors, including Constantin Brancusi, Herbert Bayer, Richard Long, James Turrell, and many others.

The final four chapters (chapter 7 is entirely new) explore at length the increasing involvement of artists in land reclamation and urban design, featuring projects by Michael Heizer, Nancy Holt, Mel Chin, Maya Lin, and many others.

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Artists' Self-Portraits

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An insightful, lavishly illustrated history of self-portraits by well-known artists from early examples in classical times through its flowering in the Renaissance to modern interpretations.

In his fascinating survey, art historian Omar Calabrese reveals that self-portraits through the ages are both a reflection of the artist and of the period in which the artist lived. Organized thematically, the author first presents a basic definition of the genre of the self-portrait, interpreting the picture to be a manifestation of self identity, and including examples from an Egyptian tomb painting and pictures on stained glass during the Middle Ages and continuing to modern times.

The next chapter focuses on the turning point for the establishment of the genre during the Renaissance when the status of the painter or sculptor was raised from artisan to artist and, as a result, portraits of the artist were considered worthwhile pictures. At first a self-portrait was hidden in a narrative painting: an artist would paint his image as part of a crowd scene, for example, or as a mythological figure. On the other extreme, once the genre was accepted, it was practiced by some artists— Rembrandt, van Gogh, Munch, and Dali, for instance—as almost an obsession. In contemporary art the self-portrait can become a deconstructed genre with the artist hiding or satirizing himself until he nearly disappears on the canvas.

Among the 300 pictures featured here are examples by such artists as Albrecht Dürer, Velàzquez, Elisabeth Vigée-Lebrun, Ingres, Degas, Toulouse-Lautrec, Gainsborough, Matisse, James Ensor, Egon Schiele, Frida Kahlo, Man Ray, Henry Moore, Robert Rauschenberg, Norman Rockwell, and Roy Lichtenstein.

This intriguing book is a fresh way to appreciate the history of art and to understand that a self-portrait is far more complex and meaningful than merely a portrait of the artist.

 

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Joel Perlman: A Sculptor's Journey

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An elegantly produced volume which illustrates celebrated American metal sculptor Joel Perlman’s finest works and relates them to his fascinating life story.

-- WINNER of the New York Book Show Award

This handsomely illustrated book is the first monograph devoted to the work of Joel Perlman (b. 1943), an acclaimed sculptor in steel and bronze, whose works are represented in the permanent collections of America’s top museums, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden. Perlman’s best works from the 1970s to the present day — from the austerely abstract Chevy Short (For Jeannie Day), shown at the 1973 Whitney Biennial, to the lyrical Sky Spirit, a monumental commission completed in 2004 — are depicted in here in stunning full-page photographs, most in full color.

All readers with an interest in contemporary sculpture will appreciate not only the book’s striking illustrations but also its thoughtfully written text, which relates Perlman’s art to his life. Author Philip F. Palmedo, drawing on extensive interviews with his subject and his subject’s colleagues, engagingly describes how each chapter of Perlman’s life — from his early days of teaching alongside Kenneth Noland and Jules Olitski in the Bennington College art department to his struggle, ultimately very successful, to establish himself in SoHo’s vibrant 1970s art scene — served to strengthen his commitment to his own abstract, Modernist aesthetic.

This thoughtful narrative, which seamlessly synthesizes Perlman’s intimate art-world anecdotes and Palmedo’s own keen critical observations, is beautifully complemented by an insightful foreword by renowned art dealer André Emmerich, whose gallery represented Perlman for twenty years.

 

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21st Century House

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This richly illustrated survey, bound in an elegant portable format, profiles the most architecturally distinguished new houses from around the globe. 

The diversity of the fifty-five houses featured in this photo-packed volume, by architects like Alvaro Siza, Tony Fretton, Hild und K, Jim Jennings Architecture, and Souto Moura Architects, demonstrates that the single-family home continues to play a pivotal role as a means of architectural expression and experimentation in the new millennium. These structures, all designed, commenced, or completed in the past four years, range from Tucson’s Campbell Cliffs, a 25,000-square-foot mansion that reimagines Frank Lloyd Wright’s classic prairie style on a massive scale, to the Living Room in Gelnhausen, Germany, a house-cum-artwork whose living room can slide from the facade like a drawer to become a balcony!

Author Jonathan Bell, an experienced architecture journalist, divides the book into four chapters that correspond to the main trends he discerns in the featured buildings: “The House in the Landscape” presents houses that stand alone in the landscape as architectural statements in the grand Modernist tradition; “New Urban Sites” highlights homes that fit into a larger architectural fabric; “Pragmatic Solutions” focuses on designs for livable, affordable, and environmentally sustainable housing; and “The Future” surveys architects’ varying visions of tomorrow’s house. The case studies of individual houses within these chapters include not only the architects’ own plans and elevations but also a generous number of full-color interior and exterior photographs—some 300 in all.

Useful supplementary features, including an introduction that illuminates the present state of residential architecture and project credits that include contact information for the featured architects, ensure that this handily-sized volume will be welcomed by all practitioners, students, and enthusiasts of architecture.

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Designing with Light

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An in-depth look at how light is used in contemporary architecture to delineate form, color, and space, with particular attention to major projects by international architects including Stephen Holl, Zaha Hadid and Rem Koolhaas.

The history of great architecture is the history of buildings that adapt creatively to light. Light possesses the power to transform an ordinary building into a majestic edifice that inspires awe. Architects rely heavily on light, looking to it as a tool that reveals form and forges the important connection between vision and construction.

Designing With Light, by award-winning architect Victoria Meyers, explores the myriad ways in which light is used in contemporary architecture, both internally and externally, to enhance the design and sense of space in a building. Vivid color photographs depict how architects employ light in buildings such as the Guggenheim Las Vegas and the National Gallery of Canada. Meyer looks at recent developments in the science of light, giving an overview of the history of light in architecture and demonstrating how the use of light in film, theater, and art has influenced light’s use in architecture. Meyers goes on to discuss how light creates architectural features such as color, line, and form, and how architects strive to control light through glass, windows, skylights, and the manipulation of shadow and reflection. She clearly illustrates these cases with intriguing examples from recent buildings designed by internationally renowned architects including Zaha Hadid, Steven Holl, Herzog & de Meuron, Rem Koolhaas, John Pawson and many others.

Meyers’ lively, informative text and hundreds of rich color photographs are sure to fascinate those interested in architecture and design. 

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