Art and Design

Goya

By

Newly revised and lavishly illustrated, this acclaimed study of Spanish master Francisco Goya reveals the artist as a pioneer of modern art and culture.

Stunning color reproductions comprehensively survey Goya's paintings and prints in this essential study of his art and its impact on the modern world. Fred Licht's masterful text, revised and updated for this edition, has been hailed as "brilliant" and "profound," one of the most original and illuminating studies of a modern European artist.Born in 1746 in a small Aragonese town, Goya rose to prominence in Madrid in the period around 1780, being named court painter in 1786. The atrocities of the Napoleonic period and the repressions of the restored Bourbon regime led Goya to paint his greatest works, now recognized as harbingers of modern art. Goya died in exile in France in 1828.

Organized according to the mediums and genres in which the artist worked, Goya is a series of investigations of those aspects of Goya's art that make it especially relevant today. By focusing closely on the work, Licht also illuminates, as few before him have done, the enigmatic personality of this artist, who, as the author affirms, "first fixed the courage and the despair of our modern age."

Read more

The Houses of Philip Johnson

By

The first book devoted to Philip Johnson's Glass House and his other innovative residential architecture.

For almost three-quarters of a century, as a critic and curator beginning in 1930s, and as a practicing architect since the 1940s, Philip Johnson has been at the center of modern architecture's development. His celebrated Glass House, built in 1949 in New Canaan, Connecticut — a crystallization of Johnson's commitment to the high modernism of his mentor Mies van der Rohe — is perhaps the single most famous house of the twentieth century. Until now, however, that house has not been looked at in the context of Johnson's many other house projects. This book, the first to comprehensively survey Johnson's residential work, not only brings to light a largely neglected side of Johnson's achievement, but freshly illuminates his entire career.

By examining all of Johnson's houses, authors Stover Jenkins and David Mohney, both architects, help us understand the Glass House as an expression of Johnson's developing thought. Focusing first on Johnson's student work at Harvard and his early commissions, they show how the Glass House reflects Johnson's concentrated study not only of pioneering modern architects including Frank Lloyd Wright and Le Corbusier, but of masters of previous centuries such as Claude-Nicolas Ledoux and Karl Friedrich Schinkel. They detail the three-year design process of the Glass House, and then show how Johnson moved beyond the influence of Mies to create a remarkably diverse body of work — one that is nevertheless unified by characteristic themes, like Johnson's inventive development of the Miesian court-house scheme, and his articulation of space by the use of connected pavilions.Johnson's clients have always included powerful patrons of art and architecture.

Presented in this book are his jewel-like townhouse for Blanchette Rockefeller and the Houston home of John and Dominique de Menil, with its enclosed court; projects for collector Joseph Hirshhorn; and the spectacular vacation house at Cap Bénat for the Biossonnas family. Recent projects include a sprawling desert compound in Israel and a village-like vacation residence in the Caribbean. But from the beginning, when Johnson submitted a house he built for himself in Cambridge, Massachusetts, as his graduate thesis, he has been his own most effective client.

The book concludes with a look at the ten built and seven unbuilt projects he has designed over the years for the New Canaan estate. As an afterword, the book includes a penetrating essay by architectural historian Neil Levine, who argues that we must now recognize Johnson's publication of the Glass House, in a 1950 article, as a turning point in the recognition of modernism as a historical movement.

Supporting a critical account of approximately thirty built and forty unbuilt projects, the book includes numerous plans and drawings, many never before published, and historical photographs. New color photographs by Steven Brooke capture the ways Johnson has used light, space, and landscape to create some of modernism's most appealing houses. Essential reading for architects and students, this book is also a vital resource for the study of one of modern architecture's most influential figures.

Read more

The World Trade Center Remembered

By

A stirring photographic tribute to the World Trade Center towers, which were the icons of the New York City skyline.

Rising dramatically above all other skyscrapers at the tip of Manhattan, the World Trade Center symbolized New York. From any direction the Towers were lodestars, Manhattan's local mountains. Nearly a decade after the dark events of 9/11, New Yorkers continue to come to terms with the tragedy, and to reminisce about the views of the Towers they once had from their homes and offices. Visitors, too, are remembering how the WTC looked as they approached Manhattan by car, plane, or from the water. As we mourn for the terrible loss of life, we also want to remember. The 72 images of the World Trade Center presented in this book depict a New York we once knew, one we are now working to rebuild.

For more than two decades, practically since the Twin Towers were erected, Sonja Bullaty and Angelo Lomeo have been photographing these awesome buildings. The pictures featured here portray the WTC from all directions, starting with views from the east at dawn, and ending with evening views from the west. There are captivating panoramas from Brooklyn, Lower Manhattan, New Jersey, and uptown, taken in all seasons, as well as a section showing the grand Plaza at the center of the buildings. Together, they create an unforgettable portrait of the Twin Towers.

Introducing this extraordinary collection of photographs, Paul Goldberger's text evokes the Towers and the city they came to symbolize. He recalls how they evolved in the public mind, targets of criticism to beloved American icons. He explains their architectural significance and explores their visceral meaning to New Yorkers.

In contrast to books depicting the disaster and the days following it, this photographic memoir will be welcomed by all of us— New Yorkers and visitors alike — who yearn to remember the way the city was.A portion of the book's proceeds are donated to the Twin Towers Scholarship Program care of Scholarship America.

Read more

William Morris

Animal/Artifact

By

Intensely powerful sculptures in glass by an innovative contemporary master.

Internationally acclaimed for his compelling work in glass, William Morris approaches the demands of glassblowing and glass sculpting with an experimental eye and an innovative hand. Morris, who lives and works near Seattle, has collaborated with master glassblowers as well as renowned painters and sculptors in making art that is widely admired by artists, sought by collectors, and praised by critics. For him, glass is an endlessly intriguing material -- fragile yet timeless, preserving the spontaneity of the creative moment unlike any other medium.

In this strikingly handsome volume of recent work, Morris explores themes related to archaeology, animals, and the hunt. His Crows, Ravens, and Rhytons embody his intellectual interest in myth and ancient history, as well as his keenly intuitive understanding of the natural world.

Read more

The Great Book of French Impressionism

By

The return of the revised edition of the most popular volume on the subject offers inspired, authoritative text and hundreds of exquisite illustrations.

The Great Book of French Impressionism celebrates the richness and exuberance of the Impressionists's world — a world of light and color, of sunlit fields and shimmering waterscapes, of bustling city views and intimate domestic scenes. The 400 illustrations in this handsomely designed volume faithfully capture the subtle nuances of light and keen perception that make French Impressionist paintings unique. This edition features recent scholarship, more complete backmatter, and an expanded index.

In her thoughtful and cogent text, art historian Diane Kelder traces the development of Impressionism from its roots in landscape and realist painting through its focus on modern urban life to its ultimate goal: to fix on canvas the fleeting moods and effects of nature in an ever-changing world. The author weaves into her narrative fascinating anecdotes and excerpts form contemporary essays and letters, examines in detail the lives and works of all the major Impressionists and Post-Impressionists, including Manet, Monet, Renoir, Degas, Toulouse-Lautrec, Seurat, and Cezanne, and shows how their work influenced others, ultimately giving rise to the new art of the twentieth century.

Read more

Bruno Fonseca

The Secret Life of Painting

By

Thoughtful texts, juxtaposed with Fonseca's striking images, offer welcome glimpses into the mysteries of how and why an artist creates.

A celebration of a brilliant young artist's tragically short career, this revealing look at Bruno Fonseca's life, unorthodox training, and startlingly diverse paintings, drawings, and sculpture not only casts light on his own impressive work but also offers unusually acute insight into the creative process. The son of a sculptor and a painter mother, Bruno Fonseca grew up in an art-filled Manhattan household and started creating his own art early on. By the age of 18, he had started a rigorous course of study with Augusto Torres in Manhattan, where he maintained a studio until his death at age 36 in 1994.

Alan Jenkins's perceptive musings about the young artist's accomplishments capture Bruno's quirky charm and summon up the complexity of his relationships with family, friends, and the history of art. Karen Wilkin investigates Fonseca's unusually traditional approach to the study of art, based on painstakingly learned ways of seeing and creating that relate more to the 19th-century Academy than to today's conceptualizing, career-chasing art schools. Isabel Fonseca's deeply touching memoir of her brother's childhood and last days brings to life his irresistible spirit and quicksilver intelligence.

Read more

Remedios Varo

Unexpected Journeys

By

The adventures that fill the strange and wonderful paintings by Remedios Varo (1908-1963) reflect the physical and psychological journeys of her own tumultuous life.

Raised in a strict Spanish family and rigorously trained in academic art, Varo first found escape in Barcelona's bohemian avant-garde. After fleeing the Spanish Civil War with the poet Benjamin Péret, later her husband, she entered the inner circle of the Surrealists in Paris. Forced to flee again by the Nazis, she and Péret faced a year of mounting danger in Marseilles before securing passage to Mexico. Finding welcome refuge in Mexico City, where she remained until her death, Varo produced the extraordinary paintings for which she gained renown.

Janet A. Kaplan's vivid chronicle, the first on the subject in English, weaves Varo's life with the artist's exquisite work. Painted with a jewellike palette and old-master precision, Varo's intimate tableaux, rich with details of women's experience, tell fantasy tales of alchemy, science, mysticism, and magic. Fifty color reproductions capture the wit and beauty of her major paintings; numerous black and white illustrations document other works and portray the compelling artist with her circle of lifelong friends and admirers. The book is further enlivened by her own voice, conveyed in hilarious letters and surreal stories, published here for the first time. It concludes with an invaluable chronology as well as a newly updated bibliography and list of exhibitions.

A woman of intense magnetism and powerful imagination, Varo had been little known outside Mexico, but she has recently found enthusiastic audiences in Europe, the Americas, Australia, and Japan. The fascinating story of her life and the dazzling intricacy of her art will prove a revelation.

Read more

Antonio Gaudi

Master Architect

By

A beautifully illustrated and comprehensive view of the fanciful, exuberant buildings by this inspired Spanish architect, whose structures and sculptures have defined Barcelona's cityscape.

Antonio Gaudí (1852-1926) is one of the most admired architects of the twentieth century. Even today, some seventy-five years after Gaudí's death, his fanciful, exuberant buildings define Barcelona's cityscape and continue to influence architects, sculptors, and designers. Perhaps best known for the dynamic, sculptural facades, found on such buildings as the church of the Sagrada Familia and Casa Milà, Gaudí is as much respected as a technological innovator as a daring stylist.

In this enlightening volume, a concise, knowledgeable text by the director of the Royal Gaudí Chair at the Polytechnical University of Catalonia (Barcelona) combines with striking images by a well-known architectural photographer to provide a new perspective on Gaudí's remarkable career. The text covers the full range of his oeuvre, describing early assignments in the 1870s as a draftsman for leading architects in Barcelona, the innovative buildings he created for the Güell Palace and Estate, daring new structural solutions at Bellesguard, architecture inspired by nature at the Casa Calvet and in the Park Güell, and the construction of his unfinished masterpiece, the Church of the Sagrada Familia, which occupied him until his death. The author traces all the influences that led to his definitive style, from his fascination with the Orient and neogothicism to his affinity for naturalism and specific geometric forms.

Brilliantly illustrated, this incisive overview of Gaudís visionary work is ideal for those who delight in his architecture as well as those who look forward to traveling to Spain to see his monumental legacy.

Read more

Childe Hassam, Impressionist

By

Hassam's impressive career as one of America's foremost Impressionists is celebrated and illuminated in this dazzlingly beautiful volume.

No other American Impressionist ever surpassed the quality and variety of Hassam's output as a painter and draftsman. Equally talented in oils, watercolors, and prints, he explored rain-swept city scenes, glorious gardens, exquisite women, and stirring flag-lined streets. Many of these irresistible pictures are hidden in private collections and are rarely, if ever, accessible to the public; others are on view at major museums across the country, from the Metropolitan Museum to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

By approaching Childe Hassam (1859-1935) from different angles, the three authors reveal this multitalented artist's many facets and uncover previously unknown aspects of his life and work. The authoritative essays are illustrated with a brilliant array of color illustrations that represent all of Hassam's styles, from Barbizon-inspired Tonalism to Impressionism to Post-Impressionism. The book concludes with an invaluable illustrated chronology and an annotated bibliography.

Read more

Chiparus

Master of Art Deco (Second Edition)

By

The definitive study of the life and work of Demetre Chiparus—one of Art Deco's greatest sculptors—now expanded with fifty-three new color illustrations.

Born in Romania, Demetre Chiparus (1886-1947) studied in Italy and France before settling in Paris, where he perfected the chryselephantine technique of combining ivory with bronze. Produced as multiples, his works were greatly admired as small-scale decorative objects and today are among the most coveted objects form the Art Deco period, capturing the lively and sensuous spirit of the time.This lavishly illustrated volume examine Chiparus's work as an embodiment of the Art Deco style.

The author explores the various contemporary inspirations for the sculptor's art, including haute couture, the music hall, Diaghilev's ballets, and the stage designs of Leon Bakst. Focusing on Chiparus's bronze and ivory pieces, he outlines their development from idea through finished piece, with illustrations of plasteline models that document the artist's working methods. The book provides much previously unknown information about Chiparus's life; and this new edition also offers an appendix devoted to his newly rediscovered paintings.

Read more

Japanese Prints

The Art Institute of Chicago

By

A compendium of the golden age of Japanese prints from one of the world's foremost collections.

The dazzling variety of Japanese woodblock prints, from serene landscapes to portraits of flamboyant actors and courtesans, is captured in this captivating volume. The book is divided into four chapters: "Primitives" (the term for Japanese woodblock prints produced between approximately 1660 and 1765); Courtesans; Actors; and Landscapes. Most of the images are printed in multiple colors and range from the seventeenth century to the late nineteenth century. The artists include such masters as Hiroshige, Hokusai, and Utamaro, who are represented by lesser-known treasures as well as by some of their most celebrated series, including Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji and One Hundred Famous Views of Edo.

Read more

The Art of Florence

(two volumes, slipcased)

By

This popular monument of scholarly and publishing history, winner of the prestigious Prix Vasari in France, is now available at an irresistible low price.

Since the radiant years of the Renaissance, the city of Florence has come for many to represent the greatest triumph of the Western cultural tradition. This is the city where humanism was born, where Plato was discussed passionately in the narrow streets, and where men and women first found themselves to be the measure of all things. For more than three centuries Florence nurtured a creative community of astounding, even revolutionary genius. Here, starting in the late 1200s, Giotto painted the grave and powerful frescoes that drew Florence and the world toward a radical new vision of realism, and here, ushering in the dazzling era of the High Renaissance, Michelangelo began his incomparable career as architect, sculptor, and painter. During the intervening years, Brunelleschi, Donatello, Ghiberti, Fra Angelico, Botticelli, Raphael, Leonardo, and hundreds of the most splendidly talented artists in history lived and worked in this small city on the Arno and collaborated in the creation of the great urban museum we know as Florence.

Matching an elegant and sophisticated text by three leading art historians with hundreds of glorious color photographs, The Art of Florence immerses us in a city and a time of unparalleled cultural ferment. This important and uncommonly beautiful publication analyzes the history of Florentine art in terms of the distinctly Florentine and Tuscan influences that shaped it—an approach never before employed in a study of this breadth and complexity. The fascinating and lucid text by Glenn Andres, John Hunisak, and Richard Turner gracefully links Florentine architecture, sculpture, and painting to the rich social fabric and the dramatic political life of the city. Woven into this compelling history is the most luxurious and comprehensive visual documentation available of Florence's unrivaled treasures. More than 700 color images and another 854 duotones and architectural drawings have been reproduced with a meticulous care worthy of the Renaissance craft tradition. Joining visual beauty with intellectual rigor in a fashion that truly invokes the spirit of this great city, The Art of Florence presents as rich a vision of human creativity as we can find anywhere outside Florence itself.

Read more

Andrea Del Sarto

By

Illustrated with 200 splendid reproductions, this monograph challenges the conventional wisdom about Andrea del Sarto, the most important painter working in Florence when Raphael and Michelangelo were active in Rome.

By returning to original sources, Natali succeeds in introducing a new Andre del Sarto (1486-1530), one whose brilliant and moving pictures leap off the pages with startling freshness. Since the 16th century, Andrea has been pictured as a "timid soul," a view first proposed in Vasari's Lives and perpetuated without revision by later writers. According to this view, the artist was so shy and irresolute that he squandered his gift, living in near obscurity and refusing prosperity and worldly honors.

Not so, says Natali, who argues instead that Andrea chose a simple but culturally vibrant life in a circle of like-minded friends—intellectuals and common folk who practiced material austerity and humility. How, asks Natali, can we label as timid an artist who painted a fresco cycle in Florence's most prestigious sacred institution when he was barely twenty years old? How irresolute was the man who accepted an open-ended invitation from French king Francis I to join his court in an era when few artists left Florence; who—amid rigid orthodoxy and accusations of heresy—filled his sacred paintings with bold theological content; who headed teams of renowned artists in learned artistic debates and in the execution of major commissions? With such provocative insights, this volume is certain to stimulate and delight art historians and non-scholars alike.

Read more

Shaker: Life, Art, and Architecture

Hands to Work, Hearts to God

By

In this pioneering study, historian Scott T. Swank reveals the links between the daily life of the Shakers in their planned religious communities and their art and architecture.

As the Director of Canterbury Shaker Village, the author has had unlimited access to the Village's archives, resources, and grounds, examining papers and artifacts, exploring the 25 remaining buildings, and experiencing the seasons. He has literally been able to walk in the footpaths of the Canterbury Shakers, whose community remained prominent for 200 years. It is one of the oldest, most typical, and most completely preserved of all the Shaker villages, the only community with an intact first-generation meetinghouse and first dwelling house on their original sites. The result of the author's painstaking research and close observation is this perceptive book, filled with discoveries, presenting the full sweep of Shaker art and architecture in the context of a specific Shaker community in Canterbury, New Hampshire.

Two centuries ago, the Shakers established America's most successful communal societies. They lived in isolated, rural villages, pursuing work and worship in communities where religion, social behavior, and environmental design were constructed as a harmonious whole. These utopian communities were regulated by "gospel order" which assured their members that their disciplined lives were in harmony with God's will. In these spiritual havens, they endeavored to accomplish their founder's twin mandates, "Hands to work, hearts to God."Shaker designs have endured long after the communities that created them have passed from the American scene. Shaker style, encompassing all elements of art and architecture, has been greatly esteemed for its craftsmanship, sense of proportion, simplicity, and practicality. The author's well researched text, detailed captions, and excerpts from diaries and letters bring life to the legacy of Shaker objects as well as to the architecture. He also provides a time line, a bibliography, and notes.

Accompanying the text are 250 illustrations including 150 in color principally by Bill Finney, who has been photographing Canterbury for over twenty years. There are also historical pictures and maps and newly created plans and diagrams.This insightful book should especially interest collectors, historians, interior designers, and architects, giving readers a deeper understanding and appreciation of the Shakers' artistic legacy.

Read more

Giovanni Bellini

By

A lavish volume on the life and masterworks of the artist whose name is synonymous with Venetian Renaissance painting.

In his seventies, Giovanni Bellini (c. 1430-1516) was described by the German master Albrecht Dürer as "very old, but still the best painter of all" and modern art historians agree that he was the most inventive of the Northern Italian painters. Giovanni, the youngest of the three Bellini artists, was the Doge's chief painter and the teacher of Titian, Giorgione, and dozens of others. He showed great imagination and versatility in producing numerous Madonna paintings for churches and private patrons, exquisitely calibrating his style for a variety of commissions from small devotional works to huge altarpieces. Beautifully observed landscapes and natural details often appear in his moving sacred scenes and in his sensitive and boldly simple portraits.

Giovanni Bellini's paintings-prized works in the collections of major museums throughout America and Europe-are presented here in stunning full-color photography to complement Anchise Tempestini's thorough and lucid text. An opening essay placing the painter in his historical and art-historical context is followed by twenty-five short essays on paintings of major importance, illustrated with enlarged details. The book closes with a catalogue raisonné of all Bellini's works, a bibliography, and indexes of works and their locations.Complete and authoritative, this elegant volume will become a standard reference for art historians and the general reader.

Read more

Cimabue

By

The first modern monograph on this master of the Middle Ages.

Definitive and richly illustrated, this volume is the first extensive examination of Cimabue's work to appear in English in more than thirty years. Cimabue (c. 1240-1302) was the most admired artist of his time in Tuscany and Central Italy. His paintings and mosaics are seen by some as the last great flowering of Medieval art, and by others as the first works of the Renaissance. His somber crucifixion scenes are complemented by his shining mosaic work in the Baptistery in Florence, and by his majestic panels of the Madonna seated on a gilded throne and attended by angels with great multicolored wings.

The earthquakes that shook Central Italy in late 1997 struck hardest at the legacy of Cimabue, crumbling his brilliantly-colored paintings in the vault of the Upper Basilica of San Francesco in Assisi. The tragic Florentine flood of 1966 had already destroyed much of the master's famous Santa Croce Crucifix. But in this book a combination of archival and newly commissioned photographs — including pictures of the Assisi vault shot just moments before its collapse — offer a complete panorama of the artist's works, before flood or earthquake damage, and before and after recent restorations.

Luciano Bellosi takes into consideration all recent scholarship and reports on the staggering changes that have forever altered the physical reality of Cimabue's creations. Two hundred and forty illustrations, most of them in color, cover the whole world of the artist, including work by his contemporaries. The superbly reproduced images, some on double gatefold pages, make this a glorious volume for art historians and art lovers alike.

Read more

Illuminated Manuscripts

Treasures of the Pierpont Morgan Library

By

Spectacular examples of early book illustration from one of the greatest libraries of illuminated manuscripts in the world.

Glorious works of art as well as documents of bygone eras, painted an illuminated manuscripts supply perhaps the greatest and by far the best-preserved evidence of daily life during the Middle Ages and Renaissance. This Tiny Folio draws on one of the greatest collections in the world to illustrate the angels, demons, and everyday denizens of the medieval world.

Read more