Art and Design

Gustave Caillebotte

Urban Impressionist

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This handsome volume offers new insight into one of the most engaging personalities of the Impressionist Movement.

Caillebotte's vivid representations of Parisian life bridged the gap between Realism and Impressionism during the 1870s and early 1880s. His Paris Street: Rainy Day and Floorscrapers — each the subject of a fascinating, extensively illustrated analysis in this book — have become icons of the Impressionists' devotion to scenes of modern urban life.

Prepared by an international team of scholars to accompany the major 1994–95 retrospective organized by the Réunion des Musées Nationaux/Musée d'Orsay, Paris, and The Art Institute of Chicago, Gustave Caillebotte: Urban Impressionist reproduces 89 of his paintings and 28 of his drawings and studies, many of them from little-known private collections. Thoughtful essays examine both his work and his crucial role as an early patron and promoter of Impressionism. A chronology, list of exhibitions, and selected bibliography provide additional invaluable information.

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Great American Houses and Their Architectural Styles

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A sumptuously illustrated, authoritative introduction to the principal architectural and decorating styles of the American house, from Colonial times to the mid-twentieth century.

In this lavishly produced volume, authors Virginia and Lee McAlester explore outstanding landmark houses that exemplify America's major architectural and interior design styles from Colonial times to the mid-twentieth century. These twenty-five houses are illustrated with more than 350 specially commissioned full-color photographs of interior and exterior views, 125 black-and-white line drawings and floor plans, historical paintings, and vintage photographs

The text not only discusses the houses' architectural innovations and design elements but also profiles the architects and their clients. The featured houses were built by many of the country's leading architects — from Alexander Jackson Davis, Richard Morris Hunt, Henry Hobson Richardson, and McKim, Mead and White to Frank Lloyd Wright, the Greene brothers, and Walter Gropius — and owned by some of its most celebrated citizens, including Thomas Jefferson, Mark Twain, Thomas Edison, Jay Gould, the Guggenheims, the Phippses, and the Vanderbilts. As a result, the book is as much a cultural history as it is an architectural study. The authors also include an informative discussion of each style as it can be seen in vernacular versions around the country.

Located all over the United States, most of the featured houses are open to the public, and the book provides their addresses and other helpful information for visitors. Great American Houses and Their Architectural Styles will be irresistible to all house lovers, architects, and designers, and will give readers a deeper understanding and appreciation of our rich architectural heritage.

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Masters of American Sculpture

The Figurative Tradition

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Commemorating the 100th anniversary of the National Sculpture Society, this important history traces America's rich heritage of figurative sculpture from the Columbian exposition of 1893 to the present.

Illustrated with outstanding examples of American figurative sculpture of the last century, this volume begins with an analysis of the influence of the Beaux-Arts tradition on the creation of the great public monuments of the young republic. With this background, the book moves on to survey important categories of sculpture chronologically.Equestrian monuments and countless tributes to war heroes are surveyed in one category. In another important grouping, author David Martin Reynolds surveys portrait sculpture. He also includes a section on medallic art, a category usually neglected in sculpture surveys.

In another innovation, Dr. Reynolds devotes a chapter to American Indians, both as widely favored subjects for sculpture and as sculptors themselves. Not neglecting genre, the author deals extensively with the large group of sculptors who concentrated on animals. Finally he surveys the figurative tradition in the twentieth century and speculates on future trends in sculpture.

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Isamu Noguchi

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This invaluable new monograph offers a provocative chronicle of the man and an enlightening analysis of his art.

A man of inexhaustible energy and invention, the sculptor Isamu Noguchi was always in motion. His career extended for more than sixty years, during which he often worked simultaneously on many diverse endeavors.Born in the United States of mixed parentage, Noguchi had a Japanese childhood and an American adolescence. His notion of modern art was forged in the Paris studio of Constantin Brancusi and modified through the utopianism of R. Buckminster Fuller. Combined with his experience of the traditional Japanese house and garden and with his work on the avant-garde stage of Martha Graham, these influences led him toward a broadened conception of sculpture as the creation of social space.

In pursuit of this ideal, Noguchi created plazas and gardens, furniture and interiors, ignoring the boundary between art and design. But he also continued the carving of stone and wood that brought him critical attention in New York during the 1940s, and the stonework he did during his last decades, in his studio complex on the Japanese island of Shikoku, allowed him to integrate his metaphysical concerns with modernist sculptural practice.

Ranging across this century and filled with engaging persons and places, Noguchi's story is a compelling one, told with refreshing verve and insight. Little-known documentary photographs from the artist's own archives and striking full-color images from every aspect of his multifaceted career complement the perceptive and gracefully written text.

About the Modern Masters series

With informative, enjoyable texts and over 100 illustrations — approximately 48 in full color — this innovative series offers a fresh look at the most creative and influential artists of the postwar era. The authors are highly respected art historians and critics chosen for their ability to think clearly and write well. Each handsomely designed volume presents a thorough survey of the artist's life and work, as well as statements by the artist, an illustrated chapter on technique, a chronology, lists of exhibitions and public collections, an annotated bibliography, and an index. Every art lover, from the casual museumgoer to the serious student, teacher, critic, or curator, will be eager to collect these Modern Masters. And with such a low price, they can afford to collect them all.

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Architecture of the Old South

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From early colonial times to the onset of the Civil War, the finest examples of antebellum architecture in the South are revealed in glorious photographs and a scholarly text.

This handsome volume is the culmination of a distinguished series that has explored the historic buildings of the Old South. The fruit of fifteen years of travel and research, Architecture of the Old South surveys the most beautiful and historic buildings of the region and illustrates them with color photographs, old prints and drawings. The authoritative, and sometimes amusing, text documents a surprising conclusion: that most of the great buildings of the Old South were created by Yankee builders and that the South participated more fully in the mainstream of American life before the Civil War than has been fully appreciated.

Indeed, the illustrations and text of Architecture of the Old South, though presenting famous shrines, explore the unexpected by-ways of Southern architecture and history. The great buildings of great cities—Baltimore, Charleston, Savannah and New Orleans—and plantations and country houses of the gentry are well represented. But here also can be found a wealth of the unfamiliar: frontier cabins, eccentric houses built by gentlemen amateurs, grand designs of professional designers from England and Europe.

When the Architecture of the Old South series was begun in 1981, the New York Times praised the first of these volumes as "dignified and handsome, with engaging texts that strike a neat balance between architectural scholarship and social history."

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Lee Krasner

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The first monograph devoted to Krasner's work, this volume skillfully explores the twists and turns of her career, offering new information and insight about one of the most intriguing painters of the postwar era.

Lee Krasner never took the easy way out — not in life, not in art. Brought up in a poor Brooklyn neighborhood and originally named Lena Krasner by her immigrant parents, she decided early on to create a new name and a new identity for herself. Later, as one of the few female painters in the aggressively male circle of Abstract Expressionists, she had to contend not only with the critics' skepticism about their new way of making art but also with the skepticism that greeted any woman's attempts to become a professional artist.

Many of Krasner's male colleagues — including her husband, Jackson Pollock — developed a unique "signature" style that identified them throughout their careers. Krasner, however, experimented with one style after another, from her early geometric abstractions (created while she was one of Hans Hofmann's most talented students), through her large-scale organic images of mid-career, to the hard-edge compositions of her late years. Certain elements recur throughout — most notably, her distinctive sense of color, her affinity for swelling forms inspired by nature, and her fearlessness in experimenting with new techniques.

Krasner's unwillingness to stick to one style, her readiness to put her career aside to focus on Pollock's, and her feuds with some of the period's most powerful critics all reduced her visibility in the art world. She has been the subject of exhibition catalogs, but this is the first monograph devoted to her work, and it brings to light all the intriguing complexities of her approach to making art. Dr. Robert Hobbs skillfully explores the twists and turns of her career, offering new information and insight about one of the most intriguing painters of the postwar era

About the Modern Masters series

With informative, enjoyable texts and over 100 illustrations — approximately 48 in full color — this innovative series offers a fresh look at the most creative and influential artists of the postwar era. The authors are highly respected art historians and critics chosen for their ability to think clearly and write well.

Each handsomely designed volume presents a thorough survey of the artist's life and work, as well as statements by the artist, an illustrated chapter on technique, a chronology, lists of exhibitions and public collections, an annotated bibliography, and an index. Every art lover, from the casual museumgoer to the serious student, teacher, critic, or curator, will be eager to collect these Modern Masters. And with such a low price, they can afford to collect them all.

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Artspoke

A Guide to Modern Ideas, Movements, and Buzzwords, 1848-1944

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This successor to the phenomenally popular Artspeak: A Guide To Contemporary Ideas, Movements, and Buzzwords chronicles international art from realism through surrealism.

An invaluable guide through the intricacies of the first century of modern art, ArtSpoke features the same lucid prose, thought-provoking ideas, user-friendly organization, and striking design as its predecessor, ArtSpeak: A Guide to Contemporary Ideas, Movements, and Buzzwords.

Chronicling international art from Realism through Surrealism, ArtSpoke explains such popular but often misunderstood movements and organizations as Impressionism, Post-Impressionism, the Salon, the Fauves, the Harlem Renaissance, and so on—as well as events ranging from the 1913 Armory Show to Brazil's little-known Semana de Arte Moderna. Concise explanations of potentially perplexing techniques, media, and philosophies of art making-including automatism, calotype, found object, Pictorialism, and Readymade-provide information essential to understanding how artists of this era worked and why the results look the way they do. Entries on concepts that were crucial to the development of modern art—such as androgyny, dandyism, femme fatale, spiritualism, and many others—distinguish this lively guide from any other art dictionary on the market.

Also unique to this volume is the ArtChart, a handy one-page chronological diagram of the groups discussed in the book. In addition, there is a scene-setting timeline of world history and art history from 1848 to 1944, overflowing with invaluable information and illustrated with twenty-four color reproductions.

Students, specialists, and casual art lovers will all find ArtSpoke an essential addition to their reference shelves and a welcome companion on visits to museums and galleries.

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Bernard Maybeck

Visionary Architect

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This bestselling volume chronicles one of the most innovative, influential, and beloved architects of the early 20th century.

Gracefully written and brilliantly illustrated, this handsome new volume captures the vision, the wit, and the down-to-earth inventiveness of one of the most influential and beloved architects of the early twentieth century.

Raised in Greenwich Village and trained in Paris, Maybeck spent most of his long career in northern California. An irrepressible bohemian with no desire to run a large office, he spent much of his time designing houses for friends and family, as well as for other patrons so loyal that they often hired him to design more than one house. Maybeck also created two of the most beautiful buildings in all of California: the exhilarating Church of Christ, Scientist, in Berkeley, and the gloriously romantic Palace of Fine Arts, in San Francisco.

This incisive overview—the first to feature color reproductions of Maybeck's exquisite interiors and exteriors—analyzes every aspect of his life and work. Not only his architecture but also his furniture, his lighting designs, and his innovations in fire-resistant construction are thoroughly discussed and illustrated. The book is also enlivened by documentary photographs, by clearly drawn plans, and by several of Maybeck's dazzling, previously unpublished visionary drawings.

Bernard Maybeck is a major study of an internationally significant architect whose environmentally responsive work has much to offer today's designers and whose houses have given enormous pleasure to those fortunate enough to visit or dwell in them.

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Joseph Urban

Architecture, Theatre, Opera, Film

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The long-awaited major biography of an important architect who was equally famous in his day for opera, stage, and film designs.

Joseph Urban already enjoyed an enviable reputation in Vienna for architecture, stage design, and book illustration before coming to America in 1911 to design productions for the Boston Opera. Soon his sets and innovative lighting caught the eye of both Florenz Ziegfeld, who lured him away to design the Follies in the 1920s, and William Randolph Hearst, who hired him as artistic director of his movie studio.Urban's lush stagecraft revolutionized American theatre design. In 1917 he was named artistic director of the Metropolitan Opera, and many of his original settings were used into the 1950s.

As an architect, Urban made memorable additions to New York's cityscape. Many have vanished, including the original Ziegfeld Theatre, but the Hearst Building and the New School for Social Research, the city's first International Style building, remain. Several of his works in Palm Beach still stand, including his most extravagant, Mar-a-Lago, the former Post estate now owned by Donald Trump. A study of this scope has long been overdue.

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Georges Braque

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The renowned partner of Picasso during the Cubist years and later the grand old man of French painting, Braque is one of the best-known and least-understood artists of our century.

From his friends' affectionate recollections, the artist emerges as a cheerful and energetic dandy, renowned for his sturdy good looks. His art suggests a different persona, however, for he was devoted to making thoughtful, deeply felt images — whether as a Fauve, a Cubist, or a mature painter working in his own distinctive style. Both the quiet intelligence of the man and the originality of his passionate yet elegant paintings emerge from the pages of this invaluable study.

About the Modern Masters series

With informative, enjoyable texts and over 100 illustrations — approximately 48 in full color — this innovative series offers a fresh look at the most creative and influential artists of the postwar era. The authors are highly respected art historians and critics chosen for their ability to think clearly and write well. Each handsomely designed volume presents a thorough survey of the artist's life and work, as well as statements by the artist, an illustrated chapter on technique, a chronology, lists of exhibitions and public collections, an annotated bibliography, and an index. Every art lover, from the casual museumgoer to the serious student, teacher, critic, or curator, will be eager to collect these Modern Masters. And with such a low price, they can afford to collect them all.

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Francis Bacon

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With their searing colors and dramatically contorted figures, the paintings of Francis Bacon compel attention. Unlike most painters of his generation, who preferred to investigate the rigors of abstraction, the 75-year-old Bacon has devoted his skills to portraying the human body.

The power and magnitude of his life's work are vividly conveyed by this thorough evaluation written by Hugh Davies, director of the La Jolla Museum of Contemporary Art, and art historian Sally Yard. Born in Dublin, as a teenager Bacon moved to London, where he worked as an interior designer and taught himself to paint. Responding to influences as diverse as Michelangelo and the photographer Muybridge, he has created a motion-filled style uniquely his own. Fascinated by the challenge of capturing what he calls "the mysteries of appearance," Bacon confronts us with emotional images that demand an emotional response.

About the Modern Masters series

With informative, enjoyable texts and over 100 illustrations--approximately 48 in full color--this innovative series offers a fresh look at the most creative and influential artists of the postwar era. The authors are highly respected art historians and critics chosen for their ability to think clearly and write well. Each handsomely designed volume presents a thorough survey of the artist's life and work, as well as statements by the artist, an illustrated chapter on technique, a chronology, lists of exhibitions and public collections, an annotated bibliography, and an index. Every art lover, from the casual museumgoer to the serious student, teacher, critic, or curator, will be eager to collect these Modern Masters. And with such a low price, they can afford to collect them all.

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The Great Book of Currier and Ives' America

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In the 1800's, long before the days of photojournalism and television, colorful up-to-date pictures of news events, portraits of important political and social figures, and scenic views of American natural wonders were circulating widely all through the country. From early in the exciting century that saw a small nation expand into a mighty world power, the famous lithographic firm of Nathaniel Currier and James Merritt Ives produced over 7,000 lithographs picturing scenes of American life, portraits of American leaders, and dramatic re-creations of the events that make the news of the day.

Each Currier & Ives prints was individually colored by hand, and the skilled craftsmanship as well as keenness of observation make Currier & Ives prints among the most collectible of Americana. This book features the largest number of Currier & Ives prints ever reproduced in a single volume, as well as many that have never been published. It contains more than three hundred illustrations in full color.

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Versailles

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Exhaustively researched and opulently illustrated, this lavish volume is certain to become the standard work on the fabulous chateau of the French monarchy.

In this opulently illustrated volume, the eminent French architectural historian Jean-Marie Pérouse de Montclos traces the transformation of Louis XIII's modest hunting lodge into the fabulous château we know today as the extravagant height of the French monarchy. Robert Polidori's sublime photographs show Versailles' architecture, interiors, and gardens, from sweeping aerial views, to grandiose views of the elaborately decorated palace ceilings, to intimate photographs of the paintings and sculptures that grace the walls and gardens. The exquisite artistry of each carefully considered decorative detail reveals Versailles in all its magnificence.

The photographs show all the beauty and ornate decoration of Versailles, in every season and from every possible perspective. Polidori presents quiet, warmly-lit landscapes of the gardens and pools, dramatic visions of the colonnades, and expansive views of the vast, airy, luxurious salons. The text is a scholarly study of the history of the evolving aesthetic of this remarkable palace, attesting not only to its importance as the ultimate expression of European absolutism but also to its significance as an experimental design workshop that was to become widely influential.

 

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Andy Warhol

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With his tomato soup cans, silk-screened disasters, and matter-of-fact commercialism, Andy Warhol helped create the Pop art ethos. Warhol's life-long infatuation with glamour and the media provided the touchstone for all his work, from his earliest shoe advertisements to the most recent celebrity portraits, all of which can be seen here.

About the Modern Masters series

With informative, enjoyable texts and over 100 illustrations—approximately 48 in full color—this innovative series offers a fresh look at the most creative and influential artists of the postwar era. The authors are highly respected art historians and critics chosen for their ability to think clearly and write well. Each handsomely designed volume presents a thorough survey of the artist's life and work, as well as statements by the artist, an illustrated chapter on technique, a chronology, lists of exhibitions and public collections, an annotated bibliography, and an index. Every art lover, from the casual museum-goer to the serious student, teacher, critic, or curator, will be eager to collect these Modern Masters. And with such a low price, they can afford to collect them all.

Praise for the Modern Masters series

"Each author has thoroughly done his or her homework, knows the historical, critical and personal contexts intimately, and writes extraordinarily well." -- Artnews

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Arshile Gorky

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With informative, enjoyable texts and over 100 illustrations—approximately 48 in full color—the Modern Masters series offers a fresh look at the most creative and influential artists of the postwar era.

About the Modern Masters series

With informative, enjoyable texts and over 100 illustrations—approximately 48 in full color—this innovative series offers a fresh look at the most creative and influential artists of the postwar era. The authors are highly respected art historians and critics chosen for their ability to think clearly and write well. Each handsomely designed volume presents a thorough survey of the artist's life and work, as well as statements by the artist, an illustrated chapter on technique, a chronology, lists of exhibitions and public collections, an annotated bibliography, and an index. Every art lover, from the casual museumgoer to the serious student, teacher, critic, or curator, will be eager to collect these Modern Masters. And with such a low price, they can afford to collect them all.

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David Smith

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Though David Smith died nearly twenty years ago, his art looms larger every year. His inexhaustible creativity, forthright ambition, and fearless exploration of new styles and media all contribute to the image of Smith as a larger-than-life American artist-hero. In this insightful new study, Karen Wilkin strips away the myths that have obscured an accurate view of Smith's life and art. Clearly, perceptively, she recounts the history of Smith's creative evolution, from his earliest paintings to the great monumental sculptures of his final years.

Having realized quite early that he had to be an artist, Smith made his way to New York and the Art Students League. There he experimented with variations on the revealing styles of Cubism and Surrealism, and slowly discovered his own technique, particularly the use of industrial methods such as welding to construct his sculptures. The results — though responsive to such varied influences as Picasso and pin-up girls — were imaginative, and often strikingly beautiful. Smith's art has inspired generations of followers, but his position as one of the masters of 20th-century sculpture remains unchallenged.

About the Modern Masters series

With informative, enjoyable texts and over 100 illustrations — approximately 48 in full color — this innovative series offers a fresh look at the most creative and influential artists of the postwar era. The authors are highly respected art historians and critics chosen for their ability to think clearly and write well.

Each handsomely designed volume presents a thorough survey of the artist's life and work, as well as statements by the artist, an illustrated chapter on technique, a chronology, lists of exhibitions and public collections, an annotated bibliography, and an index. Every art lover, from the casual museumgoer to the serious student, teacher, critic, or curator, will be eager to collect these Modern Masters. And with such a low price, they can afford to collect them all.

Read more