Art and Design: Artist Monographs

Giovanni Bellini

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A lavish volume on the life and masterworks of the artist whose name is synonymous with Venetian Renaissance painting.

In his seventies, Giovanni Bellini (c. 1430-1516) was described by the German master Albrecht Dürer as "very old, but still the best painter of all" and modern art historians agree that he was the most inventive of the Northern Italian painters. Giovanni, the youngest of the three Bellini artists, was the Doge's chief painter and the teacher of Titian, Giorgione, and dozens of others. He showed great imagination and versatility in producing numerous Madonna paintings for churches and private patrons, exquisitely calibrating his style for a variety of commissions from small devotional works to huge altarpieces. Beautifully observed landscapes and natural details often appear in his moving sacred scenes and in his sensitive and boldly simple portraits.

Giovanni Bellini's paintings-prized works in the collections of major museums throughout America and Europe-are presented here in stunning full-color photography to complement Anchise Tempestini's thorough and lucid text. An opening essay placing the painter in his historical and art-historical context is followed by twenty-five short essays on paintings of major importance, illustrated with enlarged details. The book closes with a catalogue raisonné of all Bellini's works, a bibliography, and indexes of works and their locations.Complete and authoritative, this elegant volume will become a standard reference for art historians and the general reader.

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Cimabue

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The first modern monograph on this master of the Middle Ages.

Definitive and richly illustrated, this volume is the first extensive examination of Cimabue's work to appear in English in more than thirty years. Cimabue (c. 1240-1302) was the most admired artist of his time in Tuscany and Central Italy. His paintings and mosaics are seen by some as the last great flowering of Medieval art, and by others as the first works of the Renaissance. His somber crucifixion scenes are complemented by his shining mosaic work in the Baptistery in Florence, and by his majestic panels of the Madonna seated on a gilded throne and attended by angels with great multicolored wings.

The earthquakes that shook Central Italy in late 1997 struck hardest at the legacy of Cimabue, crumbling his brilliantly-colored paintings in the vault of the Upper Basilica of San Francesco in Assisi. The tragic Florentine flood of 1966 had already destroyed much of the master's famous Santa Croce Crucifix. But in this book a combination of archival and newly commissioned photographs — including pictures of the Assisi vault shot just moments before its collapse — offer a complete panorama of the artist's works, before flood or earthquake damage, and before and after recent restorations.

Luciano Bellosi takes into consideration all recent scholarship and reports on the staggering changes that have forever altered the physical reality of Cimabue's creations. Two hundred and forty illustrations, most of them in color, cover the whole world of the artist, including work by his contemporaries. The superbly reproduced images, some on double gatefold pages, make this a glorious volume for art historians and art lovers alike.

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Coastal Images of America

Paintings by Ray Ellis

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With masterly paintings by Ray Ellis, representing more than two decades of work, and an authoritative text by Robert Ballard, an intrepid undersea explorer and scientist, this captivating book portrays the beauty, majesty, and diversity of America's Atlantic and Pacific coastlines.

Ray Ellis depicts the full sweep of the coasts in his highly praised, impressionistic style, from the Maine shoreline to the Florida Keys and from the Northwest's inland waters to Baja, California. This unsurpassed collection of oils and watercolors includes views of New England's rocky shores and sandy beaches, Chesapeake Bay oystermen caught in a squall, South Carolina's haunting Low Country, the rugged Oregon coast where Lewis and Clark first sighted the Pacific Ocean, the spirit of sailing across San Francisco Bay, and the expanse and loveliness of Big Sur. His paintings are as varied as the water's edge itself, encompassing landscapes and seascapes, as well as lighthouses, marine creatures, sailors, and beachcombers. In Walter Cronkite's words, Ellis "has the ability to see beauty in almost anything."

Robert Ballard's knowledgeable text, complementing Ray Ellis's paintings and captions, is a fascinating kaleidoscope of coastal history and natural history and provides an account of how the shoreline was formed and its condition today as well as stories of early settlers and present-day residents. The author is a foremost authority on the sea, having organized and conducted more than one hundred deep-sea expeditions, including those that located the Titanic and the Bismarck and more recently Roman ships in the Mediterranean. This is an ideal gift book for anyone who enjoys living, boating, or vacationing along the seacoasts.

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Reflections of Nature

Paintings by Joseph Raffael

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Sun-dappled carp, radiant blossoms, and tumultuous waters are among the wonders and mysteries of nature captured in Joseph Raffael's brilliant close-up paintings.

At a time when beauty is much out of favor in the art world, Joseph Raffael has taken what some would consider the highly radical step of daring to paint beautiful pictures. Long one of contemporary art's most highly regarded painters, Raffael transforms intense observations of nature into color-drenched, deeply felt works of art. He often works on a very large scale, using either watercolor, oil, or acrylic to achieve the painstaking detail of his dazzling images.

Amei Wallach's warmly perceptive introduction, inspired by a visit to the artist's home and studio in the south of France, explores Raffael's life history, his sources, and his ideas about art. Her individual chapter openers address the predominant subjects within the artist's work, including water and shore scenes, flowers, animals, fish and lilies, sacred symbols, and Raffael's wife, Lannis. A thought-provoking essay by Donald Kuspit places Raffael's painting within the larger context of twentieth-century art, psychology, and philosophy. Complementing these texts are the paintings themselves-sun-dappled carp, luminous iris, tumultuous rivers, and other wonders of nature captured in radiant visual meditations.

The artist has also contributed two engaging written pieces, both of which illuminate the pleasures and occasional terrors of the creative process. His "Diary of a Painting" traces the evolution of one major work over several months, from the original slide to the finished wall-size watercolor, providing insight into the emotional and technical demands of creating a work of art. His informative and revealing "Autobiographical Chronology" provides a personal look back, from his Brooklyn childhood to his art-making career in New York, California, and the south of France, where Joseph Raffael lives and works today.

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Shingu

Message From Nature

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Susumu Shingu's graceful wind and water-powered kinetic sculptures represent the perfect harmony between high technology and nature.

Although originally trained as a painter, Shingu became interested in sculpture when he saw one of his shaped canvases turning softly in the wind. The work that followed relied on natural forces to make it move or make sound, and he began using more sophisticated materials for outdoor works. By the time of Expo '70 in Osaka, Shingu had been commissioned to create a piece for the plaza. It contained many of the elements he would use later: parts of it were moved by both wind and water, in some ways harnessing their power but also buffeted by it. His work walks the fine line between complementing nature and being an integral part of it. The pieces, though large, colorful, and usually made of modern materials, adopt nature's rhythms in their movement.

Shingu's sculpture is found around the world, from Japan to France, Italy, and the United States. In addition to creating sculptures, he has written and illustrated several children's books and designed several theater pieces that integrate his sculptures and installations with dramatic stories. All of these endeavors are collected here — along with the artist's comments on many of the sculptures, essays by Pierre Restany and Renzo Piano, and an interview with Joseph Giovannini — in a monograph that provides a complete portrait of Shingu's diverse career.

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Sargent Abroad

Figures and Landscapes

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With impressive new scholarship and many previously unpublished, color-drenched images, this gloriously beautiful book reveals a new aspect of the artist's remarkable career.

Although most renowned for his dazzling society portraits, Sargent took greatest pleasure in escaping his studio to paint out of doors. In the past, his far-flung expeditions have been dismissed as little more than tourist jaunts. But with this book-the first significant study of the figures and landscapes that Sargent painted from 1900 (after he had established himself as one of the foremost portraitists of the age) through 1914 (when World War I changed his world)-it becomes clear that his travel paintings constitute a far larger and more important aspect of his work than previously realized. Many of these oils and watercolors come from private collections and have rarely, if ever, been seen in the years since the artist's death in 1925.

Three of the book's five chapters approach Sargent's paintings thematically, investigating the work he produced in the Alps, around the Mediterranean, and in Venice; as these enlightening essays make clear, each locale inspired a distinctive response from the artist. In the mountains he painted bubbling streams, distant views, and languorous girls in alpine meadows. In the south, he painted fruits and flowers, fragments of architecture, and villas and gardens that are dreamlike in their evocation of the past. The first essay provides a useful background to Sargent's preoccupation with landscape subjects after 1900 and traces the broad development of his style and the major influences on his work. The final essay recounts the diverse critical responses to Sargent's plein-air painting during his lifetime.

For the first time, Sargent's extensive travels are thoroughly documented here, using letters and diaries written by his companions. Charming vintage photographs, including some that Sargent is believed to have taken himself, chronicle his adventures and cast new light on this intensely private artist. The book also includes an invaluable chronology of the artist's travels as well as brief biographies of his traveling companions-mostly beloved family and dear friends-who accompanied Sargent on his creative journeys.

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Fra Angelico

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Breathtaking details and a thought-provoking text make this volume a beautiful and important reassessment of this Florentine Renaissance painter.

Called "Angelico" for his inimitable depictions of paradise, this artist (1400? -1455) and Dominican friar succeeded Masaccio as the foremost painter of the early Renaissance in Italy. Fra Angelico's painting has been beloved for centuries since as an emblem of the flowering genius of quattrocento Florence.In his engaging new appraisal, John Spike reveals the unexpectedly innovative qualities of Angelico's art, including his use of linear and geometric perspective (even before the publication of Leon Battista Alberti's famous treatise). Another of Angelico's inventions was the Renaissance altarpiece known as the sacra conversazione (sacred conversation), in which the Virgin and Child and saints, formerly each rigidly enclosed in separate panels, now gesture and relate to each other within a clearly unified space.

Fra Angelico had a lifelong fascination with the written word, and as Spike persuasively demonstrates, the accuracy of his Greek, Latin, and Hebrew inscriptions reveal his participation in the linguistic studies that flourished in Florence and Rome in the first half of the fifteenth century. He created some of the most visionary and learned compositions of his century, from his Deposition for the private chapel of the humanist Palla Strozzi to the extensive commissions in Rome for the erudite Pope Nicholas v.

In this volume Spike presents a major discovery: the secret program of the forty frescoes in the cells of the Dominican monastery of San Marco in Florence. All previous studies of this artist had concluded that the subjects and arrangement of these frescoes, the artist's masterworks, were chosen at random, or by the friars themselves. Instead, as the author now shows, Fra Angelico drew upon the mystical writings of the early church fathers to construct a spiritual exercise organized into three ascending levels of enlightenment. The San Marco frescoes can finally be seen as not only the most extensive cycle of works by any single painter of this century, but indeed the most complete pictorial expression of Renaissance theology.

With fresh insights that will influence studies of quattrocento art for years to come, Spike uses his perceptive eye and judicious readings of documents to reassess the works of Angelico, his masters, and his assistants. This essential volume contains an extensive essay on the artist's life and work, followed by large color plates with detailed discussions of individual works. Finally, a catalog presents the artist's oeuvre, as revised by the author's new attributions. With lavish details of Angelico's works and an up-to-date bibliography, this volume is not only a feast for the eyes but an indispensable resource for anyone interested in this critical period of the Renaissance.

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Norman Rockwell's Faith of America

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This heartfelt tribute to America's best-known, best-loved illustrator, first published shortly after his death in 1978 is an inspiring examination of Norman Rockwell's vision of America, one that is especially appreciated today.

Rockwell's famous Saturday Evening Post covers, the four Freedoms he painted during the years of World War II, his depictions of American towns, families, and traditions are all represented in this enchanting volume. They offer a picture of America that we hold dear, representing a world of hope and humanity.Fred Bauer writes about Rockwell's message of optimism and the artist's faith in America and its people in a forthright and sympathetic text complemented by numerous Rockwell favorites in all their warmth and color.

Bauer visits Stockbridge, Massachusetts, and Arlington, Vermont, talking to the people who lived with Rockwell and posed for his anecdotal pictures, the people about whom the artist said, "If you are interested in the characters you draw and understand them and love them, why, the people who see your pictures are bound to feel the same way." This lovely book enables us to partake once again of that unique love and understanding that Norman Rockwell still communicates to America.

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Max Beckmann

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Max Beckmann's powerful paintings and prints have had a profound impact on 20th-century art.

Even now, some forty-five years after his death, the works created by Max Beckmann exert an intense influence on contemporary art. His piercing self-portraits, his enigmatic yet compelling triptychs, his incisive prints all have earned him a well-deserved reputation as a creator of provocative work that is both emotionally and intellectually stimulating.

Born in Leipzig, Germany, in 1884, Beckmann lived an international life, studying and working in Weimar, Frankfurt, Paris, and Berlin. Successful almost from his earliest days as a professional artist, he exhibited work to acclaim throughout Europe and America. With the Nazis' rise to power, his style and his subjects became dangerously out of fashion, and he was forced into exile-first to Amsterdam, where he spent World War II, and eventually to the United States, where he died, in New York, in 1950.

Although some scholars have categorized Beckmann as a German Expressionist, he always resisted belonging to any group, asserting that "the greatest danger which threatens mankind is collectivization." He also resisted abstraction, remaining passionately committed to the figure throughout his long career. His paintings have much to say about sex, politics, and religion-which is no doubt why they so outraged the Nazis and no doubt why they have remained so absorbing to new generations of admirers.

About the Modern Masters series

With informative, enjoyable texts and over 100 illustrations--approximately 48 in full color--this innovative series offers a fresh look at the most creative and influential artists of the postwar era. The authors are highly respected art historians and critics chosen for their ability to think clearly and write well. Each handsomely designed volume presents a thorough survey of the artist's life and work, as well as statements by the artist, an illustrated chapter on technique, a chronology, lists of exhibitions and public collections, an annotated bibliography, and an index. Every art lover, from the casual museumgoer to the serious student, teacher, critic, or curator, will be eager to collect these Modern Masters. And with such a low price, they can afford to collect them all.

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Thomas Kinkade

Paintings of Radiant Light

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This inspiring volume celebrates the charming and radiant works of Thomas Kinkade, a foremost contemporary painter of light.

Thomas Kinkade's delightful paintings of cottages, countrysides, tranquil small-town America, and bustling cities seem infused with a special vision. Perhaps no American artist since Norman Rockwell has been so admired and collected for such warm, engaging scenes of American life. This inspiring volume features beautiful fold-out color plates and celebrates the radiant works of the foremost contemporary painter of light.

This book, which includes Kinkade's newest paintings, recounts the uplifting story of his life and adventures. In his own words, Kinkade recalls the inspiration behind his works and describes the fascinating personal references-to loved ones and to his faith-found in his paintings.

The most comprehensive portfolio of Kinkade's art ever printed, this volume includes detailed descriptions of his works and lavish full-color reproductions that illustrate the luminous "Kinkade glow" so collected and treasured today.

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Bernhard Gutmann

An American Impressionist

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Surprising and long overdue, this is the first monograph on a major American Impressionist and Post-Impressionist, one who recorded his travels, his family, and the joys of life with luscious color and exuberant sensibility.

The founder of the Silvermine Guild, a successful teacher, illustrator, and master of ceramic and graphic art, Bernhard Gutmann received serious critical acclaim during his lifetime, and his work was shown in major exhibitions and museums. But since his death in 1936 his work has gone unnoticed, largely because he did not need to sell his art. His works remained in the family rather than going to the collectors, museums, and galleries that would have introduced him to a general audience.

Born in 1869 and educated in Germany, Gutmann arrived in the United Stated at the age of 23. From modest immigrant beginnings—he moved to Virginia to work as an electrician—he rose to be the first superintendent of drawing in the Lynchburg public schools. After his marriage to Bertha Goldman, granddaughter of the founder of the investment banking firm Goldman Sachs, he was free to concentrate on his art alone.

Described during his "rediscovery" in 1988 as "an American Gauguin," Gutmann had a great influence on American regional art: he organized the still functioning Lynchburg Art Club in Virginia and later assisted in the foundation of the thriving Silvermine Guild of Artists in New Canaan, Connecticut.

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Jim Dine

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The first book ever to integrate Jim Dine's diverse accomplishments into one coherent chronological narrative.

The youngest of a handful of brash upstarts (soon to be labeled Pop artists) who stole the art world's spotlight from the Abstract Expressionists in the late 1950s and early '60s, Dine has been a restlessly creative force in the art world. Insatiable for new experiences, he has refused to limit himself to any one place or any one way of making art, though he has been surprisingly faithful to certain subjects, including his famous hearts, tools, bathrobes, and Venuses.Born and raised in Cincinnati, Dine has lived in New York, London, and Vermont and has spent extended periods working in numerous other cities, from Paris and Munich to Key West, Los Angeles, and Walla Walla, Washington. His aesthetic progress has been equally peripatetic, taking him from his early Pop painting and performance art to experimentation with sculpture and print-making.Dine's works are found in major collections worldwide, including the Stedelijk Museum, Boston Museum of Fine Art, Art Institute of Chicago, Tate Gallery, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Pompidou Center, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and National Gallery of Art.

About the Modern Masters series

With informative, enjoyable texts and over 100 illustrations — approximately 48 in full color — this innovative series offers a fresh look at the most creative and influential artists of the postwar era. The authors are highly respected art historians and critics chosen for their ability to think clearly and write well. Each handsomely designed volume presents a thorough survey of the artist's life and work, as well as statements by the artist, an illustrated chapter on technique, a chronology, lists of exhibitions and public collections, an annotated bibliography, and an index. Every art lover, from the casual museumgoer to the serious student, teacher, critic, or curator, will be eager to collect these Modern Masters. And with such a low price, they can afford to collect them all.

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Ingres

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The first complete study of the life and work of the artist whose rich, illusionistic surfaces dominated French painting for much of the 19th century.

The elegant portraits, serious nudes, and compelling history paints of Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres (1780–1867) are universally acclaimed. Trained in the studio of the French revolutionary painter Jacques-Louis David, Ingres infused his mentor's hard neoclassical style with sensuousness, and his incomparable draftsmanship revealed a genius for meaningful gestures. Ingres's legacy extended into the 20th century, influencing the works of such artists as Manet, Degas, Cézanne, and Picasso.

In this fascinating and elegantly written text, based on the wealth of documentary material at the Musée Ingres, Georges Vigne traces Ingres's life and work from his formative years in Rome. Vigne analyzes the qualities that have stirred controversy over Ingres's paintings since his emergence as an artist in the first years of the 19th century, including Ingres's admiration of Raphael and early Italian painting, the remarkable nuances of line and bold color combinations that earned him designations such "primitive," the arresting eroticism of his images, and the participation of his devoted studio in his work.

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David Hockney

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Hockney's engaging personality, his quirky but always enlightening ideas about art, and his inexhaustible inventiveness are captured with clear-eyed intelligence and grace in this volume from Abbeville's renowned Modern Masters series.

For a contemporary artist of serious aesthetic purpose, David Hockney enjoys immense, perhaps unequaled public visibility: the shock of dyed blond hair, the owlish glasses, and the shy, schoolboy grin are known as much through the popular press as through the journals of the art world. His engaging personality, his quirky but always enlightening ideas about art, and his inexhaustible inventiveness both of imagery and of techniques ranging from oil painting to photography to faxes are captured by Peter Clothier with clear-eyed intelligence and grace in this concise but comprehensive overview.

From his theatrical early canvases to his more recent photographic collages and operatic set designs, Hockney has tackled the challenge of space on a grand scale. At the same time, much of his work has been devoted to the things most dear to him-friends, family, home, and studio. An intellectual of wide-ranging erudition and a world traveler who makes his home in Hollywood, he still cherishes his roots in Bradford, the northern British town where he was born in 1937.

Invention, the driving force behind Hockney's art, is in good part play: "If art isn't playful," he once commented, "it's nothing." This illuminating, color-rich volume conveys with vivid clarity Hockney's serious delight in making art that gives pleasure to both its creator and its audience.

About the Modern Masters series


"Each author has thoroughly done his or her homework, knows the historical, critical and personal contexts intimately, and writes extraordinarily well." -- Artnews

With informative, enjoyable texts and over 100 illustrations--approximately 48 in full color--this innovative series offers a fresh look at the most creative and influential artists of the postwar era. The authors are highly respected art historians and critics chosen for their ability to think clearly and write well. Each handsomely designed volume presents a thorough survey of the artist's life and work, as well as statements by the artist, an illustrated chapter on technique, a chronology, lists of exhibitions and public collections, an annotated bibliography, and an index. Every art lover, from the casual museumgoer to the serious student, teacher, critic, or curator, will be eager to collect these Modern Masters. And with such a low price, they can afford to collect them all.

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Gustave Caillebotte

Urban Impressionist

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This handsome volume offers new insight into one of the most engaging personalities of the Impressionist Movement.

Caillebotte's vivid representations of Parisian life bridged the gap between Realism and Impressionism during the 1870s and early 1880s. His Paris Street: Rainy Day and Floorscrapers — each the subject of a fascinating, extensively illustrated analysis in this book — have become icons of the Impressionists' devotion to scenes of modern urban life.

Prepared by an international team of scholars to accompany the major 1994–95 retrospective organized by the Réunion des Musées Nationaux/Musée d'Orsay, Paris, and The Art Institute of Chicago, Gustave Caillebotte: Urban Impressionist reproduces 89 of his paintings and 28 of his drawings and studies, many of them from little-known private collections. Thoughtful essays examine both his work and his crucial role as an early patron and promoter of Impressionism. A chronology, list of exhibitions, and selected bibliography provide additional invaluable information.

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Isamu Noguchi

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This invaluable new monograph offers a provocative chronicle of the man and an enlightening analysis of his art.

A man of inexhaustible energy and invention, the sculptor Isamu Noguchi was always in motion. His career extended for more than sixty years, during which he often worked simultaneously on many diverse endeavors.Born in the United States of mixed parentage, Noguchi had a Japanese childhood and an American adolescence. His notion of modern art was forged in the Paris studio of Constantin Brancusi and modified through the utopianism of R. Buckminster Fuller. Combined with his experience of the traditional Japanese house and garden and with his work on the avant-garde stage of Martha Graham, these influences led him toward a broadened conception of sculpture as the creation of social space.

In pursuit of this ideal, Noguchi created plazas and gardens, furniture and interiors, ignoring the boundary between art and design. But he also continued the carving of stone and wood that brought him critical attention in New York during the 1940s, and the stonework he did during his last decades, in his studio complex on the Japanese island of Shikoku, allowed him to integrate his metaphysical concerns with modernist sculptural practice.

Ranging across this century and filled with engaging persons and places, Noguchi's story is a compelling one, told with refreshing verve and insight. Little-known documentary photographs from the artist's own archives and striking full-color images from every aspect of his multifaceted career complement the perceptive and gracefully written text.

About the Modern Masters series

With informative, enjoyable texts and over 100 illustrations — approximately 48 in full color — this innovative series offers a fresh look at the most creative and influential artists of the postwar era. The authors are highly respected art historians and critics chosen for their ability to think clearly and write well. Each handsomely designed volume presents a thorough survey of the artist's life and work, as well as statements by the artist, an illustrated chapter on technique, a chronology, lists of exhibitions and public collections, an annotated bibliography, and an index. Every art lover, from the casual museumgoer to the serious student, teacher, critic, or curator, will be eager to collect these Modern Masters. And with such a low price, they can afford to collect them all.

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Lee Krasner

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The first monograph devoted to Krasner's work, this volume skillfully explores the twists and turns of her career, offering new information and insight about one of the most intriguing painters of the postwar era.

Lee Krasner never took the easy way out — not in life, not in art. Brought up in a poor Brooklyn neighborhood and originally named Lena Krasner by her immigrant parents, she decided early on to create a new name and a new identity for herself. Later, as one of the few female painters in the aggressively male circle of Abstract Expressionists, she had to contend not only with the critics' skepticism about their new way of making art but also with the skepticism that greeted any woman's attempts to become a professional artist.

Many of Krasner's male colleagues — including her husband, Jackson Pollock — developed a unique "signature" style that identified them throughout their careers. Krasner, however, experimented with one style after another, from her early geometric abstractions (created while she was one of Hans Hofmann's most talented students), through her large-scale organic images of mid-career, to the hard-edge compositions of her late years. Certain elements recur throughout — most notably, her distinctive sense of color, her affinity for swelling forms inspired by nature, and her fearlessness in experimenting with new techniques.

Krasner's unwillingness to stick to one style, her readiness to put her career aside to focus on Pollock's, and her feuds with some of the period's most powerful critics all reduced her visibility in the art world. She has been the subject of exhibition catalogs, but this is the first monograph devoted to her work, and it brings to light all the intriguing complexities of her approach to making art. Dr. Robert Hobbs skillfully explores the twists and turns of her career, offering new information and insight about one of the most intriguing painters of the postwar era

About the Modern Masters series

With informative, enjoyable texts and over 100 illustrations — approximately 48 in full color — this innovative series offers a fresh look at the most creative and influential artists of the postwar era. The authors are highly respected art historians and critics chosen for their ability to think clearly and write well.

Each handsomely designed volume presents a thorough survey of the artist's life and work, as well as statements by the artist, an illustrated chapter on technique, a chronology, lists of exhibitions and public collections, an annotated bibliography, and an index. Every art lover, from the casual museumgoer to the serious student, teacher, critic, or curator, will be eager to collect these Modern Masters. And with such a low price, they can afford to collect them all.

Read more