Art and Design: Fine Art

Treasures of the Art Institute of Chicago

Paintings from the 19th Century to the Present



A world-class collection of paintings, in the palm of your hand.

The Art Institute of Chicago houses some of the most celebrated paintings from the nineteenth century to the present: Georges Seurat’s A Sunday on La Grande Jatte, Grant Wood’s American Gothic, Edward Hopper’s Nighthawks.

These and nearly three hundred other masterpieces, from Delacroix and Ingres to Takashi Murakami and Kerry James Marshall, are illustrated in a vibrant new edition of this best-selling Tiny Folio. It has been completely revised and updated to bring it up to the present day, and to reveal the full international scope of the Art Institute’s painting collection.

This charming little volume is at once the perfect memento of a visit to the Windy City, and a pocket-sized survey of the styles and subjects of the last two-plus centuries of painting, from Neoclassicism and Romanticism to the pluralistic practices of today’s global art world.

James Rondeau is President and Director of the Art Institute of Chicago.

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Enduring Ideals

Rockwell, Roosevelt, and the Four Freedoms



A landmark volume placing Norman Rockwell’s Four Freedoms in their historical and artistic context.

Franklin Delano Roosevelt closed his 1941 State of the Union address with a vision of a world founded upon four human values: Freedom of Speech, Freedom of Worship, Freedom from Want, and Freedom from Fear. By 1943, America had entered World War II, and inspired to do his part, Norman Rockwell painted a series of four paintings based on these Freedoms.

Rockwell’s innately American interpretations of the Freedoms found a familiar home at The Saturday Evening Post, where they proved overwhelmingly popular. The U.S. government put the works on tour, and they helped raise $133 million for the war effort.

Enduring Ideals reveals the complex and sometimes unexpected story behind FDR’s Freedoms and the role
of Rockwell’s paintings—on tour for the rst time in a generation—in illuminating them. In doing so, it brings together other works, by Rockwell and his contemporaries— such as Ben Shahn, Dorothea Lange, and Gordon Parks— along with analysis and commentary by art historians and others, including activist Ruby Bridges, artist Daisy Rockwell, and Ambassador William vanden Heuvel.

Stephanie Haboush Plunkett is Deputy Director/Chief Curator, Norman Rockwell Museum.

James W. Kimble, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Communication, Seton Hall University.

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Zao Wou-Ki



The most complete monograph on one of the world’s greatest contemporary painters.

Raised in Shanghai, Zao Wou-Ki (1920–2013) rose to prominence in his adopted France, and was one of the world’s most celebrated artists at the time of his death. Trained in both Western and Chinese painting, Zao’s work transcended both.

“I wanted to paint di erently,” Zao Wou-Ki wrote about his decision to leave China in 1948, and shortly after he landed in Paris, his work took on in uences of Henri Matisse and Paul Klee. As he moved beyond the West for inspiration, Zao gradually moved beyond China, too, employing abstraction; enormous, multi-panel canvases; and bright colors that recall J. M. W. Turner or Franz Kline.

Prepared in cooperation with the artist’s estate, Zao Wou-Ki: 1935–2010 includes excellent color reproductions of more than three hundred works, as well as a biocritical essay, detailed notes on key works, a critical anthology, and an illustrated chronology.


Dominique de Villepin is a writer of non ction and poetry. He served as prime minister of France from 2005 to 2007.

Yann Hendgen is a curator and the artistic director of the Zao Wou-Ki Foundation.

Françoise Marquet is the artist’s widow and was a curator at the Musée d'art moderne de la Ville de Paris.


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Women Walking

Freedom, Adventure, Independence


This elegant survey of more than 60 works of art chronicles the nascent liberation when women began to walk freely by themselves in public.

At the close of the eighteenth century, women began to discover a new sense of freedom, adventure, and self-determination, simply by walking in public unaccompanied. Previously, solitary walks by women were considered unseemly. An unaccompanied hike in the country was beyond imagination; to promenade by oneself on city boulevards was unthinkable.

This book features evocative paintings of women doing just that, by a range of artists, from the late eighteenth to the early twentieth century, among them British portraitist Thomas Gainsborough, the scandalous Gustave Courbet, Impressionist Gustave Caillebotte, American masters Winslow Homer and John Singer Sargent, and Nabi artist Félix Vallotton.

With paintings act her guide, Karin Sagner takes us on a visual journey through this vital yet oft-overlooked aspect of women’s emancipation, from the promenades of the nobility to everyday walks in the city, on gentle strolls in the country or hikes up mountain summits. Quotes by luminaries like the Marquise de Sévigné, Jane Austen, and Simone de Beauvoir gracefully support her points.

A thoughtful gift for graduates, teachers, or Mother’s Day, this subtle but profound book is not only an illuminating history but a beautiful art historical survey and an inspirational guide.

Karin Sagner is an art historian, writer, and curator. She has worked at the Bavarian State Paintings Collections in Munich and has published several books on French and German art of the 19th and 20th centuries. Her previous titles include Beautiful Women and Renoir and His Women (2012), both published in German by Elisabeth Sandmann Verlag.



Women Walking is a work of art, the stunning paintings nothing short of intoxicating. The history of women for the first time finding freedom, by walking the countryside and grand parks of Europe―not to mention climbing the treacherous peaks of Mont Blanc in entirely impractical clothing―is both captivating and entirely timely, given today’s growing walking trends.” ―Diana Nyad, the first person to swim from Cuba to Florida, a story captured in her memoir Find a Way. Nyad has also launched a the national walking initiative

“A beautiful compendium of moments when women have seized their independence and set out on foot. Even where they've been captured by male artists, you can see the glint in their eyes: so this is freedom.” ―Lauren Elkin, author of Flâneuse: Women Walk the City

"This richly illustrated volume offers an engaging social history of women and recreational walking with a focus on nineteenth-century Europe. Author Karin Sanger takes us along nature walks, mountain hikes, and strolls through different European capitals, as captured by a wide range of artists from the period, supplemented with excerpts from novels and other contemporary sources.” ―Kathryn Calley Galitz, author of The Metropolitan Museum of Art: Masterpiece Paintings

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Giuseppe Panza

Memories of a Collector


One of the world’s foremost collectors of modern art shares the story of his remarkable life, times, and culture.

A dedicated collector and advocate of contemporary art since the late 1940s, Giuseppe Panza has played a fundamental role in the artistic culture of his time, introducing American phenomena such as Abstract Expressionism, Minimalism, Pop Art, Environmental Art, and Conceptualism to the museums of Europe. Now, in a brilliant response to everyone’s primary question about Modern Art—“What does it mean?”—Panza shares philosophical insights and personal reflections that bridge a half-century of discovering new artists and movements.

Panza was among the first to buy the works of Rothko, Kline, Lichtenstein, and many of the other major figures of post-WWII art, watching as their works skyrocketed in monetary value as well as historic importance. He pursued collecting with undiminished enthusiasm through the 1980s and 1990s, all the while searching for the best venues in which to display his latest acquisitions. Sections of his private collection were exhibited by and acquired into major collections, particularly the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles and the Guggenheim in New York. Among his signature innovations was the juxtaposition of contemporary art with historic settings—Baroque palaces, ancient European public buildings, his own eighteenth-century villa—in order to create unexpected and stimulating dialogs between the architectural context and the work of art.

Complete with 110 full-color illustrations, spanning decades of transformation in art and world culture, Giuseppe Panza: Memories of a Collector provides a unique glimpse into the movements and trends that have defined modern art. It is also the fascinating life story of a man who helped define the trends themselves, through passion, insight, and prophetic taste.

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Treasures of the Louvre


This large-format edition of Abbeville's popular Tiny FolioTM highlights masterpieces as chosen by the director of the world's most famous museum.

Two hundred years ago, the doors of the Louvre opened to the public for the very first time. The palace of the French kings had been transformed into a museum that today stretches over an enormous architectural ensemble right in the heart of Paris.

The royal collections first assembled by Francis I in the sixteenth century were later transferred to the Louvre palace, and this prestigious core was further enriched with artistic treasures during the Revolutionary period. The collections have been growing ever since, and are today divided into seven departments. Oriental Antiquities, Egyptian Antiquities, and Greek, Etruscan, and Roman Antiquities illustrate the art and culture of the ancient Near and Middle East and the Mediterranean countries. The other four so-called "modern" departments--painting, sculpture, decorative arts, and drawing-span Western art from the height of the Middle Ages to the mid-nineteenth century.

With superb reproductions of nearly 400 of the museum's most renowned masterpieces, this glorious volume provides a grand tour of the Louvre's unparalleled collection, and highlights the extraordinary range of artistic traditions that have gradually found their place in this museum.

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Japanese Prints

The Art Institute of Chicago


A compendium of the golden age of Japanese prints from one of the world's foremost collections.

The dazzling variety of Japanese woodblock prints, from serene landscapes to portraits of flamboyant actors and courtesans, is captured in this captivating volume. The book is divided into four chapters: "Primitives" (the term for Japanese woodblock prints produced between approximately 1660 and 1765); Courtesans; Actors; and Landscapes. Most of the images are printed in multiple colors and range from the seventeenth century to the late nineteenth century. The artists include such masters as Hiroshige, Hokusai, and Utamaro, who are represented by lesser-known treasures as well as by some of their most celebrated series, including Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji and One Hundred Famous Views of Edo.

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Illuminated Manuscripts

Treasures of the Pierpont Morgan Library


Spectacular examples of early book illustration from one of the greatest libraries of illuminated manuscripts in the world.

Glorious works of art as well as documents of bygone eras, painted an illuminated manuscripts supply perhaps the greatest and by far the best-preserved evidence of daily life during the Middle Ages and Renaissance. This Tiny Folio draws on one of the greatest collections in the world to illustrate the angels, demons, and everyday denizens of the medieval world.

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A myriad of angels in a multitude of guises, as portrayed by artists ranging from Giotto, Fra Angelico, and Botticelli to Bernini, Rembrandt, Rossetti, and Keith Haring.

With nearly 300 radiant images, Angels surveys every aspect of artists' long-held fascination with this irresistible subject. Included are angels from the first millennium to contemporary times, represented in frescoes, oil paintings, mosaics, prints, stained glass, tapestries, manuscript illuminations, and sculpture.

Divided into seven chapters—Angel Portraits, Heavenly Messengers, Hosts of Angels, Cherubs, Patterns of Flight, Battles of Good and Evil (which includes the fallen angels), and Guardian Angels and Companions—this captivating little book offers a fresh look at an ancient and eternally popular subject.

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Female deities of all types and temperaments, from around the world and throughout history.

Since time immemorial, artists have created impassioned images of the goddess as the ultimate generator and destroyer of life, as fertility figure, and as ruler of love and war. Encompassing a variety of media — sculpture, painting, photography, performance art, and film — Goddesses also provides an enlightening text exploring all her many guises.

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Edgar Degas


A compact survey of Degas's art from early portraits to late nudes and bathers.

Edgar Degas (1834-1917), a founding member of the Impressionist movement, was one of the group's most original and independent artists. This Tiny FolioTM offers insight into the themes and preoccupations that make his paintings, sculptures, and brilliant pastels so well-loved today.

As sublime as it is thorough, this survey of Degas's life and art illustrates his famous and perceptive portraits, his enchanting pictures of Parisian life, his beloved and popular racehorse scenes, his late nudes and bathers, and his celebrated depictions of the opera and ballet.

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