Lifestyle and Culture: History and Archeology

The Civil Rights Movement

A Photographic History, 1954-1968

By

The first book to tell the story of the civil rights movement through the rousing and often wrenching photographs that recorded, promoted, and protected it.

With a striking selection of images and a lively, informative text, Steven Kasher captures the danger, drama, and bravery of the civil rights movement. After an introduction explaining the significance of photography to the movement, the text in this important book proceeds from the Montgomery bus boycott through the student, local and national movements; the big marches; Freedom summer; Malcolm X; and the death of Martin Luther King.

Each chapter begins with a fast-paced narrative of a crucial event in the movement, complemented by a portfolio of the most effective and evocative photographs of the subject. Ranging from the well known to the rare, these images were shot by such photographers as Richard Avedon, Danny Lyon, Charles Moore, Gordon Parks, Dan Weiner, and more than 50 others. Many of the pictures are accompanied by thought-provoking remembrances and analysis by various photographers and participants.

Read more

The Lost Cities of the Mayas

The Life, Art, and Discoveries of Frederick Cather

By

Set in the unexplored jungle of Central America in the mid-1800s, this true-life adventure story will enthrall the armchair archaeologist.

Recounted here for the first time is the adventurous life of Frederick Catherwood, the 19th-century English artist who discovered the lost Mayan cities in the jungles of Central America and the Yucatân plateau. In 1839 Catherwood and his American companion, John Lloyd Stephens, were the first Westerners to view the immense terraces, fabulous temples, and elaborate palaces that had been inexplicably abandoned ten centuries earlier. Superbly illustrated by Catherwood, Stephen's lively travel diaries recounting their extraordinary archaeological discoveries were published in 1841 and 1843.

Using these journals and his own extensive research, author Fabio Bourbon has pieced together Catherwood's fascinating biography, which until now has been shrouded in mystery. Illustrating this handsome large-format book are more than 200 engravings made from Catherwood's original drawings. Also reproduced is Catherwood's Views of Ancient Monuments in Central America, Chiapas and Yucatân--a rare color portfolio considered to be his best work. Catherwood's other adventures are also described-his first trips to Europe and Egypt, his later expeditions to Central America, and finally his experiences in California. This intriguing book about an intrepid adventurer/artist will appeal to anyone interested in exploration, architecture, and archaeology.

Read more

Treasures of The National Air and Space Museum

By

This Tiny FolioTM vividly portrays the history of flight, as illustrated by artifacts from the most popular museum in the world, with more than 8 million visitors annually.

The Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C., is the world's most popular museum, with more than eight million visitors each year. The museum houses a celebrated collection of airplanes, spacecraft, and other artifacts that document the history of aviation and spaceflight.This book presents 280 artifacts from the museum's collection and archives, chronicling some of the greatest technological and human achievements of the century.Milestones of flight such as the Wright 1903 Flyer, Lindbergh's Spirit of St. Louis, Earhart's Lockheed Vega, Yeager's Bell X-1 Glamorous Glennis, and the historic craft that took American astronauts into space and brought them back from the Moon are all here. So, too, are lesser known but nonetheless important workhorses of commercial and military aviation history such as the Douglas DC-3, the North American P-51 Mustang, and the Piper J-3 Cub.

The unusual, the fanciful, the prototypes, and even a few unsuccessful experiments are included in this remarkable journey through the skies and into space.Finally, this book features a special "behind the scenes" look at vintage and modern photographs, posters, paintings, and sculpture from the museum's archives and collection of art and popular culture.This fascinating Tiny FolioTM serves as an illustrated survey of the history of aviation and spaceflight, as well as an introduction to the museum's renowned collection.

Read more

The Nixon Years, 1969-1974

White House to Watergate

By

An intimate and dramatic view of the Nixon presidency through the lens of insider Fred J. Maroon, featuring largely unpublished pictures, and accompanied by an incisive text by eminent journalist Tom Wicker.

When Nixon became president, no other outside photographer had the kind of access Maroon was given to the White House and later to the re-election committee. As a result, this photographic portfolio offers an exceptional view of the Nixon years, from his inauguration as the 37th president through the Watergate hearings to his emotional resignation. Maroon has provided factual and anecdotal captions for each of the 134 photographs included that further illuminate the surprising events of Nixon's terms of office while Tom Wicker has written an objective, insightful narrative benefiting from hindsight and newly released Watergate tapes.

In the wake of President Clinton's near ouster, this timely look at Nixon's resignation is especially fascinating. The book was published on the 25th anniversary of Nixon's departure from office, and the photographs were included in a major exhibition at the Smithsonian Institution.

Read more

Gardens Through History

Nature Perfected

By

The gardens of the world's great civilizations are revealed through sumptuous color plates and a fascinating text.

With its sumptuous color plates, comprehensive scope, and fascinating text, this ground-breaking international history of the garden as an art form is easily the most ambitious and rewarding work of its kind. Beginning with the ancient civilizations of Egypt, Greece, and Rome, this book skillfully uncovers the evidence of gardening through the art, history, and literature of these early sites of culture, as well as later findings of archaeology. It then takes us farther afield into the later civilizations of Islam and Mughal India, reveals the important contributions of Italy and France, China and Japan, lingers in the incomparable gardens of England, and finally transports us to the New World.

Structured around themes of the international exchange of aesthetic ideas and the exciting saga of the study, cultivation, and distribution of plant life, the book's progression is both chronological and geographic; each chapter identifies and discusses the major design and horticultural contributions made to garden history in each period and by each society. Although there have been numerous garden histories, there has never been one of this historical and global scope, a history that is solidly based in the author's vast learning, both in the worlds of literature and art as well as gardening, and graced by is masterful prose.

Another factor that differentiates this comprehensive history from the others is its final section, which explores the dramatic impact on Europe of the discovery in 1492 of a new continent with its own unique flora and fauna, which led to the opening of a fresh chapter in science. The author develops this section of the book through an extensive coverage of the history of garden culture in the Western Hemisphere, beginning with the worldwide exchange of new plant discoveries starting in the seventeenth century as European plantsmen scoured the world for exotic additions to the plantings in fledgling botanical gardens. Beginning with what is known of colonial American gardens and the extraordinary efforts in this century to reconstruct them at such sites as Mount Vernon, Monticello, and especially Williamsburg, the author leads us through the accomplishments of New World gardeners, including those of South America and Mexico, ending up with a survey of the newest international developments in gardening.

From ancient Persia to the modern private estates of Europe and North America, gardening has been one of the most consistent signs of a great civilization and the most visually absorbing expression of culture.

Read more

Two for the Devil

By

This searing third novel in the critically acclaimed Small Worlds series records the cruel fate of the villagers of Krimsk as they encounter the twentieth century's greatest agents of evil: Joseph Stalin and Adolph Hitler.

It is Rosh Hashanah — the Jewish New Year and Day of Judgment — in Moscow during the Stalinist purges of 1936. In the Lubyanka secret police prison, senior investigator Grisha Shwartzman masterfully pursues the rigorous logic and obsessive legalism of the Soviet witch-hunt. Facing an extraordinary prisoner, Grisha realizes that the Soviet system he has faithfully served is murderously corrupt and that he himself will be the next victim — but not an innocent one. In despair, he flees to his home, where his deranged wife and an unexpected Rosh Hashanah letter from his father-in-law, the enigmatic Krimsker Rebbe in America, await him. The Day of Judgment proves to be a startling experience as Grisha, the once idealistic radical, judges himself, accepts his responsibilities, and is guided to sublime passion and possible redemption by his mad wife, who for twenty years has been patiently awaiting him in a closed wardrobe.

In 1942 a train of imprisoned Jews leaves the Warsaw ghetto for "resettlement in the East." It is Yom Kippur — the Day of Atonement and the holiest day of the Jewish year. In a crowded cattle car stands a lonely, defeated individual who is ashamed that he cannot even remember his own name. During the tortuous journey Yechiel Katzman will overhear a talmudic debate and meet a dull-witted giant who turns out to be none other than Itzik Dribble, also from Krimsk. As they arrive in the death camp of Treblinka, Yechiel remembers not only his name but also the Krimsker Rebbe's prophetic curse that exiled him from Krimsk forty years earlier. Yet as death approaches, that curse will prove a blessing.

Stalin and Hitler decree certain death, but Grisha and Yechiel discover Jewish fates. The devil incites loneliness, degradation, despair, and even complicity; through memory, the victims elicit community, dignity, and the awareness of sanctity. Grisha's "Soviet" Rosh Hashanah and Yechiel's "Nazi" Yom Kippur are truly "Days of Awe." Even when death is certain, life can be lived.

Read more

Hieroglyphics

The Language of Ancient Egypt

By

A complete handbook revealing the secrets of the hieroglyphic writing of the Nile Valley, which provides a still-vivid snapshot of the gods, the people, and the everyday life of the Ancient Egyptians.

Both literal and highly lyrical, hieroglyphics bring alive a distant world, with descriptions of the natural environment, the art, the society, the religious beliefs, and even the philosophical basis of a culture that flourished 5,000 years ago. Presenting and explaining almost 600 of the figures used in the classic phase of Egypt's "sacred writing," this fascinating volume traces the origins and the meaning of each sign, as well as its graphic stylization.

An opening essay reveals the secrets of the hieroglyphic system, including its development and its structural characteristics, and emphasizes the sacred, evocative, even magical power of the form, which — unlike our own abstract alphabet — is immediate and expressive. Concluding the book are a complete glossary, a bibliography, and an index, designed to make this book invaluable to the casual reader as well as the student and specialist.

Read more

In Times of War and Peace

By

As photojournalists since the early 1980s, the Turnleys have covered most of the great conflicts of the past fifteen years, and have been published in the best-known newspapers and magazines. Very often, one of their photographs becomes the iconic representation of the event. This is a result of their spending extended periods in the regions they cover, getting to know the people and the way of life.

During the three years David lived in South Africa, he showed apartheid as the prevailing system, its subsequent destruction, and the first elections of the new democratic state. Peter has pursued his interest in documenting the world's fourteen million refugees, and also photographed the fall of Communism in Russia and Eastern Europe. Together they photographed student dissidents in the months leading up to the Tiananmen Square massacre; their photographs of the massacre itself are among their most recognizable. Shining through all the photographs is the strength of individual character and hope against powerful social and political conflict.

Read more