Parents and Kids

Father For Life

A Journey of Joy, Challenge, and Change

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The essential guide for every dad by the bestselling author of Expectant Father and the New Father series, Father for Life is the first book to look at the phases of fatherhood from the conception of a child through the grandfather years.

While there have been many books about child development and motherhood, precious little has been written about how fathers change and develop as parents or about how children influence their fathers' development. Yet most fathers know that a man who's just found out that his wife is expecting is a very different kind of man from the one he'll be when he holds his newborn in his arms for the first time. And that same dad will have changed again — psychologically and emotionally — by the time his baby speaks for the first time. Fathers evolve and develop throughout every stage of their children's lives — from the preschool and elementary school years through the tumultuous teens, young adulthood, middle age, grandfather years, and beyond. But no matter what the child's age, a father is always a father.

In this ground-breaking book, Armin Brott presents the stages of fatherhood with the same thoroughness, accessibility, and humor that have made his critically acclaimed books the most popular fatherhood guides in the country. He offers a wealth of information and practical tips, incorporating the wisdom of experts, studies about parental development, and his own extensive interviews with hundreds of fathers. Because fatherhood is a progression, the chapters are organized chronologically and describe a father's physical and emotional growth, how he influences a child at every age, and how a child impacts a father's evolution in turn. Brott covers everything from such general issues as how to juggle work and family roles, how to affect the kind of person your child becomes, and when to encourage his individuality and independence to such specific topics as how to get to know your baby, what to do if your teen uses drugs, and how to cope when adult children return home.

Illustrated throughout with New Yorker style cartoons that underscore the universality of the joys and woes of parenting, Father for Life is brimming with insights and advice, and is an indispensable, lifelong guide — not only for every dad, but for every mom and child as well.

 

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How Artists See America

East West South Midwest

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Abbeville Kids expands its award-winning series of interactive, inquiry-based books designed to teach children about the world by looking at art, and about art by looking at the world.

Each volume in this innovative best-selling series, with over 200,000 in print, is devoted to a subject that every child already knows from personal experience. In How Artists See America, sixteen works of art show the many different ways a selection of great artists — from Winslow Homer and Childe Hassam to Georgia O'Keeffe and Romare Bearden — have perceived the breathtaking variety of landscapes and the diversity of people living in the four major regions of the United States. Author Colleen Carroll's engaging, conversational text is filled with thought-provoking questions and imaginative activities that spark children's natural curiosity both about the subject of the artwork and about the way it was created.

This direct, interactive approach to art — and to the world — promotes self-exploration, self-discovery, and self-expression. As it introduces artistic concepts, styles, and techniques, it also provides loads of fun. For children who want to know more about the artists whose works appear in the book, biographies are provided at the end, along with suggestions for further reading and an international list of museums where each artist's works can be seen. As they begin to understand the multitude of ways that artists see, children naturally deepen their appreciation of art, the world around them, and most important, their own unique vision.

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How Artists See Artists

Actor, Painter, Dancer, Musician

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Abbeville Kids expands its award-winning series of interactive, inquiry-based books designed to teach children about the world by looking at art, and about art by looking at the world.

Each volume in this innovative series is devoted to a subject that every child already knows from personal experience. The works of art chosen for each book show the many different ways great artists have perceived and expressed that very subject. Author Colleen Carroll's engaging, conversational text is filled with thought-provoking questions and imaginative activities that spark children's natural curiosity both about the subject of the artwork and about the way it was created.

This direct, interactive approach to art — and to the world — promotes self-exploration, self-discovery, and self-expression. As it introduces basic artistic concepts, styles, and techniques, it also provides loads of fun. For children who want to know more about the artists whose works appear in the book, biographies are provided at the end, along with suggestions for further reading and an international list of museums where each artist's works can be seen. As they begin to understand the multitude of ways that artists see, children will deepen their appreciation of art, the world around them, and, most importantly, their own unique visions.

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How Artists See Feelings

Joy Sadness Fear Love

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Abbeville Kids expands its award-winning series of interactive, inquiry-based books designed to teach children about the world by looking at art, and about art by looking at the world.

Each volume in this innovative series is devoted to a subject that every child already knows from personal experience. The works of art chosen for each book show the many different ways great artists have perceived and expressed that very subject. Author Colleen Carroll's engaging, conversational text is filled with thought-provoking questions and imaginative activities that spark children's natural curiosity both about the subject of the artwork and about the way it was created.

This direct, interactive approach to art — and to the world — promotes self-exploration, self-discovery, and self-expression. As it introduces basic artistic concepts, styles, and techniques, it also provides loads of fun. For children who want to know more about the artists whose works appear in the book, biographies are provided at the end, along with suggestions for further reading and an international list of museums where each artist's works can be seen. As they begin to understand the multitude of ways that artists see, children will deepen their appreciation of art, the world around them, and, most importantly, their own unique visions.

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Sleeping Beauty

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Retelling a classic fairy tale by the Brothers Grimm with bright illustrations and a clever tone. 

The story of Sleeping Beauty is told here with simplicity and charm. Sixteen years after an angry fairy casts this spell, the princess pricks her finger on a spindle and the entire kingdom falls asleep — until one hundred years later a handsome prince rides up to the thorn-covered castle, awakens them all, and happily marries the beautiful girl.

The stories in the Classic Fairy Tales series have been adapted for children today while respecting the richness and flavor of the original versions. The small size of the books and their warm, inviting illustrations will appeal to children, who will also love the game page at the end of each book and will want to read all the books in the series.

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The Gingerbread Man

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Retelling a classic fairy tale with bright illustrations and a clever tone. 

Run, run, as fast as you can! You can't catch me - I'm the Gingerbread Man! is the infectious refrain that this legendary character taunts at his hungry pursuers through this classic, playful romp. In the end it is the sly fox who knows a better way to get a bite of this runaway afternoon snack.

The stories in the Classic Fairy Tales series have been adapted for children today while respecting the richness and flavor of the original versions. The small size of the books and their warm, inviting illustrations will appeal to children, who will also love the game page at the end of each book and will want to read all the books in the series.

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How Raven Stole the Sun

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In this new addition to the popular Tales of the People series, striking illustrations combine with a fascinating retelling of a traditional Tlingit tale.

A long time ago, Raven was pure white, like fresh snow in winter. This was so long ago that the only light came from campfires, because a greedy chief kept the stars, moon, and sun locked up in elaborately carved boxes. Determined to free them, the shape-shifting Raven resourcefully transformed himself into the chief's baby grandson and cleverly tricked him into opening the boxes and releasing the starlight and moonlight. Though tired of being stuck in human form, Raven maintained his disguise until he got the chief to open the box with the sun and flood the world with daylight, at which point he gleefully transformed himself back into a raven. When the furious chief locked him in the house, Raven was forced to escape through the small smokehole at the top — and that's why ravens are now black as smoke instead of white as snow.

This engaging Tlingit story is brought to life in painterly illustrations that convey a sense of the traditional life of the Northwest Coast peoples.

About the Tales of the People series

Created with the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI), Tales of the People is a series of children's books celebrating Native American culture with illustrations and stories by Indian artists and writers. In addition to the tales themselves, each book also offers four pages filled with information and photographs exploring various aspects of Native culture, including a glossary of words in different Indian languages.

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Little Mouse

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Retelling a classic fairy tale with bright illustrations and a clever tone.

Little Mouse's adventure begins when she follows a big, tantalizing hazelnut under a large tree and down into the home of a gnome who keeps her as his servant. Little Mouse escapes with the hazelnut and discovers a tiny jeweled necklace inside!

The stories in the Little Pebbles series have been adapted for children today while respecting the richness and flavor of the original versions. The small size of the books and their warm, inviting illustrations will appeal to children, who will also love the game page at the end of each book and will want to read all the books in the series.

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The Emperor's New Clothes

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Retelling classic fairy tales with bright illustrations and a clever tone. 

The foolish emperor is tricked by two "weavers" who claim that their beautiful fabric can be seen only by the competent people in the kingdom. Ultimately, it is the honest child who outsmarts the town in this classic Hans Christian Andersen tale that encourages self-confidence.

The foolish emperor is tricked by two "weavers" who claim that their beautiful fabric can be seen only by the competent people in the kingdom. Ultimately, it is the honest child who outsmarts the town in this classic Hans Christian Andersen tale that encourages self-confidence.

The stories in the Classic Fairy Tales series have been adapted for children today while respecting the richness and flavor of the original versions. The small size of the books and their warm, inviting illustrations will appeal to children, who will also love the game page at the end of each book and will want to read all the books in the series.

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The Butterfly Dance

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Third in the acclaimed Tales of the People series, this tale of a young girl's first Butterfly Dance captures the spirit of the Hopi culture.

With its bright, stylized illustrations and distinctive Native voice, this appealing book gives a vivid sense of stepping into another culture. It chronicles one important day seen through the eyes of a young Hopi girl named Sihumana, or "Flower Maiden," who is a member of the Rabbit Clan and winningly portrayed as a rabbit. After going with her grandfather to greet the sun and bless the day, Sihumana travels with family to another village to take part in the traditional Butterfly Dance, performed late each summer in order to bring rain to the dry lands of the Southwest. The tale ends happily with the sound of rain on the roof and the promise of butterflies in the days to come.

Created with the Smithsonian's National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI), Tales of the People is a series of children's books celebrating Native American culture with illustrations and stories by Indian artists and writers. In addition to the tales themselves, each book also offers four pages filled with information and photographs exploring various aspects of Native culture, including a glossary of words in different Indian languages.

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The Endurance

Shakleton's Perilous Expedition in Antarctica

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This true adventure tale of courage and survival tracks the dangerous expedition to Antarctica led by Sir Ernest Shackleton.

Intrigued by the mysterious, vast continent at the bottom of the world, Sir Ernest Shackleton fearlessly led 27 men to explore Antarctica — but on their way to its shore, their ship Endurance was crushed by the relentless ice! The shipwrecked team braved many months stranded on an ice floe (through an Antarctic winter), facing extreme hunger, frostbite, illness, and exhaustion. But through Shackleton's heroic effort to sail in an open wooden lifeboat to the nearest inhabited land — hundreds of miles away through the treacherous ocean — everyone was eventually rescued and this amazing true story began to be told again and again.

Accompanying this tale for young readers are lovely watercolor paintings that capture the beauty of the Antarctic landscape and the team's heroic determination to survive. Young readers and adults alike will also be fascinated by the maps, chronology, and further background this book provides on one of history's most extraordinary expeditions.

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How Artists See Families

Mother, Father, Sister, Brother

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In How Artists See Families children can see how Carmen Lomas Garza captured the simple pleasure of a family eating watermelon on the front porch; how Kikugawa Eizan used curved lines to show the gracefulness with which a mother carries her young son; how John Singer Sargent depicted the flowerlike delicacy of two sisters as they light lanterns in a twilit summer garden; and how Winslow Homer showed a boy's protectiveness of his younger brother in a dangerous situation.

How Artists See is a breakthrough series of interactive, inquiry-based books designed to teach children about the world by looking at art and about art by looking at the world. Each volume presents sixteen diverse works of art, all devoted to a subject that every child already knows from personal experience. Author Colleen Carroll's engaging, conversational text is filled with thought-provoking questions and imaginative activities that spark children's natural curiosity both about the subject of the artwork they are looking at and about the way it was created. This direct, interactive approach to art — and to the world — promotes self-exploration, self-discovery, and self-expression.

The books introduce basic artistic concepts, styles, and techniques, and are loads of fun. For children who want to know more about the artists whose works appear in each book, biographies are provided at the end, along with suggestions for further reading and an international list of museums where each artist's works can be seen. As children begin to understand the multitude of ways that artists see, they will deepen their appreciation of art and artists, of the world around them, and of their own unique vision.

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How Artists See Work

Farm, Factory, Home, Office

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In How Artists See Work children can see how Patrick Desjarlait showed in one painting the many tasks that go into making maple syrup; how the Limbourg Brothers created the feeling of a hot July day on a medieval farm; how Jacob Lawrence used bright, bold colors and diagonal lines to capture the dynamic energy of a carpentry workshop; and why Maggi Hambling chose to portray a famous scientist with four hands instead of two.

How Artists See is a breakthrough series of interactive, inquiry-based books designed to teach children about the world by looking at art and about art by looking at the world. Each volume presents sixteen diverse works of art, all devoted to a subject that every child already knows from personal experience. Author Colleen Carroll's engaging, conversational text is filled with thought-provoking questions and imaginative activities that spark children's natural curiosity both about the subject of the artwork they are looking at and about the way it was created.

This direct, interactive approach to art — and to the world — promotes self-exploration, self-discovery, and self-expression. The books introduce basic artistic concepts, styles, and techniques, and are loads of fun. For children who want to know more about the artists whose works appear in the book, biographies are provided at the end, along with suggestions for further reading and an international list of museums where each artist's works can be seen.

As children begin to understand the multitude of ways that artists see, they will deepen their appreciation of art and artists, of the world around them, and of their own unique vision.

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The Grandmother Principles

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Written with warmth, wit, and wisdom, this straightforward guide to grandmothering is based on the principles all grandmothers need to know.

The Grandmother Principles:

  • The grandmother way is the easy way
  • Grandmothers already have tenure.
  • Everything comes to an end eventually
  • A grandmother is a safe haven
  • There's nothing so simple that you cannot make it complicated if you really try
  • The most powerful way to teach is by example
  • People with real clout don't have to throw their weight around
  • Grandmothers don't have to be politically correct
  • When getting somebody else to do a task is more work than just doing it yourself, do it yourself
  • Most arguments are about who is in charge
  • It's always safe to talk to a grandmother
  • Grandmothers delegate
  • A grandmother is not a quarterback
  • Somebody has to be the grown-up
  • No sickness or injury is so bad that panic can't make it a lot worse
  • There are secret stories that only grandmothers should know
  • It will be finished when it's finished
  • Grandmothers plan for the long haul
  • If it can't be done one way, it can be done some other way
  • After you give people something, it belongs to them
  • For grandmothers, the light doesn't have to be perfect.

Written with warmth, wit, and wisdom, this straightforward guide to grandmothering is based on the principles that all grandmothers need to know. These principles — commonsense aphorisms ranging from "The grandmother way is the easy way" to "Grandmothers don't have to be politically correct" — teach women how to think like grandmothers and discover the grandmotherly way to handle any situation that comes along in their lives. In the past women learned these skills by observing their own grandmothers. But in today's highly mobile society, fewer and fewer women have access to grandmother "role models." And that is why author Suzette Haden Elgin, an experienced grandmother of ten, has written this inspiring, information-filled book.

She covers all aspects of grandmothering, including:

* Mediating family arguments* Learning the art of growing old gracefully* Saying no without feeling guilty* Coping with emergencies* Managing resources-money, time, and energy* Being a long-distance grandmother* Keeping the family history* Teaching crafts to grandchildren

Dozens of sidebars provide invaluable tips on topics as diverse as traveling with kids, wonderful gifts that can be made on a copying machine, and the best grandparenting sites on the Internet. Illustrated with delightful cartoons that underscore the joys and challenges of grandmotherhood, The Grandmother Principles is an indispensable reference for — and a great comfort to — grandmothers of all ages and experience.

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How Artists See Cities

Streets, Buildings, Shops, Transportation

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Abbeville Kids expands its award-winning series of interactive, inquiry-based books designed to teach children about the world by looking at art, and about art by looking at the world.

How Artists See is a breakthrough series of interactive, inquiry-based books designed to teach children about the world by looking at art and about art by looking at the world. Each volume presents sixteen diverse works of art, all devoted to a subject that every child already knows from personal experience. Author Colleen Carroll's engaging, conversational text is filled with thought-provoking questions and imaginative activities that spark children's natural curiosity both about the subject of the artwork they are looking at and about the way it was created.

This direct, interactive approach to art — and to the world — promotes self-exploration, self-discovery, and self-expression. The books introduce basic artistic concepts, styles, and techniques, and are loads of fun. For children who want to know more about the artists whose works appear in each book, biographies are provided at the end, along with suggestions for further reading and an international list of museums where each artist's works can be seen.

As children begin to understand the multitude of ways that artists see, they will deepen their appreciation of art and artists, of the world around them, and of their own unique vision.

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How Artists See Play

Sports, Games, Toys, Imagination

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In How Artists See Play children can see how Jacob Lawrence chose bright colors and strong curving lines to convey the speed and energy of Olympic relay racers; how Maxfield Parrish used his imagination to paint a whimsical dragon; how Jean-Baptiste Chardin painted a boy blowing a soap bubble so realistically that it seems you could pop the bubble with your finger; and how Dick West depicted a community of Native Americans enjoying a winter field day.

How Artists See is a breakthrough series of interactive, inquiry-based books designed to teach children about the world by looking at art and about art by looking at the world. Each volume presents sixteen diverse works of art, all devoted to a subject that every child already knows from personal experience. Author Colleen Carroll's engaging, conversational text is filled with thought-provoking questions and imaginative activities that spark children's natural curiosity both about the subject of the artwork they are looking at and about the way it was created. This direct, interactive approach to art — and to the world — promotes self-exploration, self-discovery, and self-expression.

The books introduce basic artistic concepts, styles, and techniques, and are loads of fun. For children who want to know more about the artists whose works appear in the book, biographies are provided at the end, along with suggestions for further reading and an international list of museums where each artist's works can be seen. As children begin to understand the multitude of ways that artists see, they will deepen their appreciation of art and artists, of the world around them, and of their own unique vision.

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In the Paint

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Basketball superstar/artist Patrick Ewing has teamed up with an art educator to create an interactive book that will inspire young artists to express themselves through paint.

If you wanted to make a painting about how you like to swim, or of your friends, or about what you did last summer, would you feel comfortable doing it? In this groundbreaking book for young artists, basketball superstar Patrick Ewing and an experienced art educator team up to create an interactive book that encourages youngsters to express themselves through paint. Ewing has long been a role model for kids because of his enormous success as a hoopster, dominating the painted area of the court. As this book reveals, he is also an accomplished painter whose landscapes were reproduced on two Private IssueTM by DiscoverTM credit cards.

Unlike other books that explain exactly how to paint a person or an object, this book inspires children to be creative-to show experiences or feelings through the medium of paint. Ewing and Louis emphasize that in painting the process of thinking and discovering is more important than the actual depiction. The authors help children discover what they can do with paint by explaining how to mix primary colors, change the consistency of paint, use brushes for special effects, and much more. But the principal focus is to encourage kids to get ideas for their paintings from meaningful events in their own lives and ask themselves such questions as "How do I get to school?" or "What fierce or friendly animals do I know?"

Throughout the book, which is illustrated with paintings by children, Ewing offers words of encouragement, and he gives an account of his life "in the paint." There is also a wonderful guide for parents and teachers that provides advice on how to help kids become confident, self-sufficient painters, to foster their creativity, and excite them about the pleasures of painting.A portion of the proceeds will be donated to Make-A-Wish Foundation.

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