Lifestyle and Culture: Pets and Animals

Literary Chickens

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 From the best-selling photographer of Ancient Trees, an arresting collection of black-and-white chicken portraits paired with quotations from classic literature.

Fierce, funny, and flamboyant, fifty-two heritage-breed chickens assess the camera with a keen gaze. By focusing on the faces of her avian subjects, Beth Moon reveals them to us not just as beautiful and exotic creatures, but as individuals in their own right.

Moon’s intimate portraits capture a startling range of emotions and personalities, underscored by excerpts from literature. A martial Spanish White Face is flanked by a passage from Beowulf; a fantastical Buff-Laced Polish, by a line from Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland; and a refined Blue Polish, by a character sketch from Swann’s Way.

Essays by chicken keeper and best-selling author Melissa Caughey and cultural critic Collier Brown shed additional light on this fresh and remarkable body of work, which will appeal to animal lovers and literature buffs alike.

Beth Moon, a New York–based photographer, has gained international recognition for her large-scale, richly toned platinum-palladium prints. Her other books include Ancient Trees: Portraits of Time and Ancient Skies, Ancient Trees.

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Mix-A-Mutt

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Flip and flop heads, tails, and bodies to make 1,000 crazy canines!

From the best-selling illustrator of Flip-o-saurus and Flip- o-storic comes another book with charming artwork and die-cut pages for mix-and-match fun—this time with
dogs! Mix-a-Mutt lets you create wacky combinations often different breeds, including both popular pets like the Labrador Retriever and show dogs like the shaggy Komondor and the wrinkly Shar-Pei.

Each flap features a fun fact about the pictured breed, and inside the front cover is a chart showing the relative size of the dogs featured, from the Yorkshire Terrier to the Great Dane.

Sara Ball is a prolific illustrator of children’s books, including Abbeville’s Flip-o-saurus and Flip-o-storic.

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I Dream of an Elephant

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From the author-illustrator of Abbeville's Big Cat, Small Cat comes a second rhyme-completion concept book, teaching children about colors through bright landscapes of loveable elephants.

I Dream of an Elephant takes readers through a wondrous world where they will encounter elephants of many colorful shades that sing, dance, and play—each in its own vibrant shade. The book's color-themed spreads feature adorably active, wide-eyed elephants in a matching landscape. These illustrations provide the hints needed for children to chime in and complete the missing word (the color) from each rhyming couplet. I Dream of an Elephant teaches children about colors with an interactive, fill-in-the-blank challenge that encourages participation. Accomplished illustrator Ami Rubinger once again turns his imagination and humorous eye to an otherwise simple subject, and his colorful elephants will make little faces smile. The bold graphics are fun and unique, depicting a variety of friendly, flamboyant elephants that will engage young readers while the rhyme game hleps them learn colors.

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Zen Cats

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To delight cat lovers everywhere, here are more than 60 irresistible portraits of the Zenlike cats of Japan.

The embodiment of Zen--independent, serene, enlightened--these cats inhabit the temples, shrines, gardens, and parks of Japan. Photographer Yoshiyuki Yaginuma has captured these free spirits in many poses, from meditating in a garden and baring fangs in a hunting stance to frolicking with the family, perching on statues, and curling in repose.In Japan cats have always occupied a special place: the eternal symbol of good luck is a white cat with its paw raised, and ancient screens from centuries past are often graced with a cat. And in the rarified world of Buddhist and Shinto temples, cats have been welcomed for practical reasons. Since the monks eat rice and so do mice, there's more rice for the monks with cats regulating the population.

Fascinated by these Zen cats, Yaginuma regularly visits temples and other places where they reside, and he feels that the cats wait to greet him and his camera. Jana Martin's intriguing commentary discuss the cat in Japanese myth, folklore, and in Zen writings. She pairs the irresistible feline portraits with poems by generations of Zen disciples and monks, who do not assign any human quality to them but praise them for what they are. How perfectly Zenlike after all!

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