Photography

India Exposed

The Subcontinent A-Z

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An insightful look at modern Slumdog Millionaire India, a country of stunning contrasts where the past meets the future.

Author-photographer Clive Limpkin traveled extensively throughout India to capture this vast and populous nation. The photographic legacy of his journeys is impressively far-reaching, both in geographic scope and subject. His thematic photographic approach is complemented by thoughtful essays on various subjects. From “Army" and "Astrology" to "Yoga" and "Zebu," India Exposed examines natural life, culture, and regions in India. Limpkin’s photographs and essays invite his reader to learn about the issues and trends facing India today.

The Indian subcontinent is a vastly diverse, naturally vibrant, and culturally rich region of the world. India is also a country of stark contrasts. After the annual dry season, heavy monsoon rains return the Indus River valley to a lush green. India is both ahead of and behind the “development” curve: at the forefront of high-tech modernization on the one hand and struggling with overpopulation, hunger, and poverty on the other. India is a pluralistic society that is both multiethnic and multilingual. Though influenced by Western technology, in many ways India still clings to its unique past.

From overcrowded cities to luscious wildlife reserves, India comes alive in 200 impressive and colorful pictures.

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Walking the World's Natural Wonders

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A lively tour of the most spectacular walking routes on earth, accompanied by detailed maps and stunning photography.

On every continent, in every age, people have marveled at the wonders of the natural world. Unlike vehicular transportation, walking allows the traveler to experience these wonders on a vivid sensuous level, enjoying all the sights, sounds, and smells of a beautiful landscape. In Walking the World’s Natural Wonders, traveler Jon Sparks takes readers on a guided tour across 34 such landscapes, profiling the world’s most magnificent walking routes from the mountains of Hawaii to England’s Jurassic Coast.

Accompanied by stunning photography from around the globe, Sparks’s vibrant text will appeal to anyone with a sense of adventure. Each of the 34 profiles also contains a regional map and a facts and figures box detailing route distance and altitude, optimal travel season, accommodation options, and more. Covering six continents and some of the world’s most gorgeous scenery, Walking the World’s Natural Wonders is the perfect inspiration for your next walking adventure.

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Wonders of the Indian Wilderness

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A spectacular celebration of the flora and fauna of the Indian wilderness, one of the most beautiful, diverse, and endangered ecosystems in the world.

The veneration of nature has always been an integral part of Indian culture, but the country’s wilderness is rapidly disappearing and only small fragments of it now remain. In the face of this ecological threat, Wonders of the Indian Wilderness provides a lavish celebration of India’s unique natural treasure and a call to preserve it in the years to come. Over 800 pages in scope, the book devotes its first half to exploring “The Nature of Biodiversity in India,” illustrating the incredible natural abundance of one of the twelve acknowledged mega-diversity nations of the world. Author Erach Bharucha describes the varied species and ecosystems of India, confronting the urgent need to conserve the country’s biodiversity—a vital resource with immense economic potential—in the process.

Among the hundreds of illustrations are a dazzling foldout review of Earth’s geological and evolutionary history and an eight-page extravaganza on India’s rich floral heritage. The second half of the volume focuses on “National Parks and Wildlife Sanctuaries of India,” recounting the distinctive plants, animals, and habitats the author has encountered in his travels through more than eighty of these areas—as well as the sobering changes he has witnessed in them over the years. Featuring more than 2,000 stunning full-color images, Wonders of the Indian Wilderness is not only an indispensable guide for environmentalists, educators, and eco-tourists but also an outstanding visual feast for the connoisseur. It is the most comprehensive overview available of the richness and sheer beauty of life in the Indian wilderness.

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A World History of Photography

4th Edition

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This sumptuously illustrated volume, hailed as an indispensable work on the fascinatingly expressive photographic medium, has been revised and expanded to cover images by contemporary photographers working in the twenty-first century.

From the camera lucida to the latest in digital image making and computer manipulation, photographic technology has dramatically changed throughout its nearly 200-year history, as succinctly explained and powerfully illustrated in A World History of Photography. Thanks to the unique immediacy with which photography captures perspective and history, the popularity and use of the camera spread rapidly around the globe. Today, photography is ubiquitous: from newspapers and fashion magazines to billboards and the film industry, cultures worldwide have embraced this malleable artistic medium for a limitless variety of purposes.

Naomi Rosenblum’s classic text investigates all aspects of photography — aesthetic, documentary, commercial, and technical — while placing photos in their historical context. Included among the more than 800 photographs by men and women are both little-known and celebrated masterpieces, arranged in stimulating juxtapositions that illuminate their visual power. Authoritative and unbiased, Rosenblum’s chronicle of photography both chronologically and thematically traces the evolution of this still-young art form. Exploring the diverse roles that photography has played in the communication of ideas, Rosenblum devotes special attention to topics such as portraiture, documentation, advertising, and photojournalism, and to the camera as a means of personal artistic expression.

The revised fourth edition includes updates on technical advances as well as a new chapter on contemporary photographers. Armed with the expressive vigor of its images, this thorough and accessible volume will appeal to all.

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Celestial Nights

Visions of an Ancient Land

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This new collection of compelling night photography contrasts the arid landscape of Israel and the Sinai Desert against the awesome and eternal spectacle of the night sky.

In Celestial Nights, photographer Neil Folberg skillfully captures a spectacular world of nocturnal landscapes where the horizon isn’t always definitive. The earth and heavens are mingled in this collection of arresting photographs, which to Folberg represent a blurred division between present and eternity, substance and spirit, and knowledge and imagination. As Folberg writes, “No one can draw that line with precision, for we exist in all of these worlds at once.”

Celestial Nights marks Folberg's return to black-and-white photography, a technique he honed as a student and colleague of the late Ansel Adams. The volume presents a set of photographs that capture not only the skies but also their earthly foreground, creating a striking juxtaposition of the vast arid wilderness with the infinite and starry heavens. These stunning nighttime scenes feature the same historically and religiously resonant region of the Middle East that Folberg captured in daytime color in his first book, Abbeville’s In a Desert Land.

The landscapes in Celestial Nights carry an aura that is both earthly and divine. Folberg’s photographs describe places where the spiritual is at once near, imprinted in the arid landscapes, and far away, in the dark, starlit recesses of space. This extraordinary photographic collection is sure to fascinate anyone with an interest in photography, astronomy, or the Middle East.

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Israel through My Lens

Sixty Years as a Photojournalist

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The compelling autobiography of Israel's preeminent photojournalist, illustrated with his most memorable images. 

Today, photojournalist David Rubinger stands at the peak of his profession: a winner of the Israel Prize for services to the media and a fixture on the masthead of Time, he is the only photographer whose work is on permanent display at the Knesset, Israel’s legislature. In this fascinating volume, he reports his own story, which in many ways reflects the history of Israel that he has recorded so faithfully with his camera. Born in Vienna in 1924, he emigrated to British Palestine in 1939 and developed a passion for photography while serving in the British army’s Jewish Brigade. After fighting in Israel’s War of Independence, he became a professional news photographer, reporting on each of his young nation’s subsequent wars from the front lines, at first for the Israeli media and later as a correspondent for Time-Life. He photographed all of Israel’s leaders, many of whom have allowed him a remarkable degree of access to their lives; Ariel Sharon said, “I trust Rubinger even though I know he doesn’t vote for me.” But Rubinger has not confined his reporting to war and politics; by photographing the successive waves of Jewish immigrants from Europe, the Arab world, Russia, and Ethiopia, he has also created a valuable record of Israel’s transformation from a country of six hundred thousand to one of seven million.

In recounting his eventful career, Rubinger proves himself a gifted raconteur, sharing anecdotes of the many leading personalities he has photographed and telling the stories behind his most famous pictures, many of which are reproduced here at fullpage size. Also illustrated are a selection of Rubinger’s never-before-published personal photographs, which provide vivid behind-the-scenes glimpses into the fast-paced and sometimes daring work of a photojournalist. Both a personal account of one man’s life with the camera and a visual document of the birth of a nation, Israel through My Lens is an essential book for anyone with an interest in Israeli history or the art of photojournalism.

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Humanitas

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A vibrant collection of images by an award-winning photographer, whose striking portraits taken on travels throughout Asia compel us to look humanity straight in the eye.

Humanitas is the result of a five-year photographic adventure. During this time, Fredric Roberts traveled extensively throughout Asia, from India to Cambodia, Bhutan to Thailand, Myanmar to China, some areas that were recently in the news after being ravaged by the tsunami. While this collection of images preceded the disaster and was only coincidentally released in its wake, it became a timely tribute to these people. Cicero coined the term humanitas (literally, “human nature”) to describe the development of human virtue in all its forms, denoting fortitude, judgment, prudence, eloquence, and even love of honor — which contrasts with our contemporary connotation of humanity (understanding, benevolence, compassion, mercy).

The Latin term is certainly a fitting title as we are struck not with pity for his subjects’ poverty, but with respect and awe for their individual fortitude and eloquence: each photograph tells us a compelling story. From a touching portrait of a mother and child to isolated monks at prayer, Roberts’s fifty-five photographs introduce us to a wide array of fascinating individuals. With an introduction by Arthur Ollman, Director of the Museum of Photographic Arts, and an afterword by Dennis High, Executive Director/Curator, Center for Photographic Art, Humanitas captures the spirit and the beauty of each subject and will be a sheer delight to any lover of photography or travel.

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Humanitas II

The People of Gujarat

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On the heels of his success with Humanitas, Fredric Roberts astonishes us yet again with his vibrant photography on virtually every page of Humanitas II, an in-depth and personal look at the face of the Gujurat.

In a brilliant follow-up to his critically acclaimed book, Humanitas, Fredric Roberts continues his journey in search of humanity with Humanitas II, chronicling stories of beauty and grace, work and family, spirituality and devotion, while redefining photographic documentation and representation. This time he takes us to Mumbai and throughout the state of the Gujarat in India. Roberts’s striking photographs explore India today and its links to the past. Here are day-to-day events as well as special ceremonies, giving us a firsthand view of these peoples that serves to the gap between “us” and “them.” The subject often looks directly at the photographer and at the reader, effortlessly prompting a cross-cultural dialogue

Arthur Ollman, Director of the Museum of Photographic Arts, returns in this volume with a foreword, and Deborah Willis contributes her introduction to place this stunning second installment of Humanitas in context.

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How to Photograph Children

Secrets for Capturing Childhood's Magic Moments

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A friendly, technically savvy guide to taking irresistible photos of all the children in your life.

Few parents can resist the urge to photograph every adorable stage of their children’s lives, but most parents do it more lovingly than well. No matter how enthusiastic they are, too often the results are blurry, overexposed, and boring snapshots.

Newly revised with an entirely new chapter on the latest trends in digital photography, How to Photograph Children offers practical, detailed, and nonintimidating advice to help transform that enthusiasm into memorable photographs that capture a child’s distinctive spirit (and involve the child in the process). After gently guiding the amateur photographer through such technical basics as which camera, film, and exposure to use, the authors offer specific suggestions about shooting indoors and out as well as invaluable advice (based on their own long experience as successful professional portrait photographers) about working with children at each age.

The book includes useful information about how to get the best work out of the photofinisher, even if it’s just your local one-hour mini-lab. Throughout, sidebars offer additional information on everything from film speeds to “smile getters,” and the 200 photographs provide clear examples of what to do — and what not to do — when photographing children of every age and temperament.

 

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Traveling with the VW Bus and Camper

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A brightly illustrated homage to the VW bus in all its forms, including the history of the vehicle and the travel adventures VW owners have undertaken at the wheel of their bus or camper.

Introduced in the 1950s, the VW bus was designed to be multifunctional. Since then, it has come to symbolize fun, freedom, and adventure. VW bus owners fully incorporate their vehicles into their lives: Some treat them as an extension of their home, while others undertake epic journeys in them, across desert and sea, and through Europe, Asia, and Africa. Some strap surfboards to the roof and head for the nearest beach, while others soup up the engines and take them drag racing in California. All will spend hours restoring and customizing them and even more time talking about them with fellow bus owners.

Traveling with the VW Bus and Camper is a tribute to this passion, to the owners who have lavished time, effort, and inspiration on their campers, and, of course, to the VW bus itself. This book traces the cult of the camper, from family errands to vacation home to design icon. Above all else, the campervan is living history and readers will find chapters dedicated to travel narratives detailing road trips from England to Afghanistan and back, ad campaigns that sell the VW bus lifestyle, and weddings and other family events that feature buses in their ceremonies. Obsession or addiction? See for yourself.

 

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Weekend in Havana

An American Photographer in the Forbidden City

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An insightful exploration of the people of Havana and their daily activities, as seen through the lens of the American photographer Robert A. McCabe.

Both Cuba and the United States have strict rules governing photographic activity in Cuba. The U.S. carefully delineates what kinds of photographic undertakings are forbidden, while Cuba has, in the past, imprisoned photographers for giving a “distorted image of Cuban reality.” Nevertheless, photographer Robert A. McCabe managed to satisfy the many regulations, and spent four eventful days in Havana, taking pictures of a people rarely seen by the rest of the world.

Weekend in Havana celebrates Havana’s citizens in a compilation of moving and thought-provoking photographs, 97 in total and all in full color. From images of buildings which combine classical influences with splashes of vibrant color to intimate portraits of the people, the book’s presentation of Havana is fresh and realistic. The reader will meet a range of closely observed personalities, such as a policeman patrolling in a shabby police car, an expression of boredom and frustration flitting across his face; women young and old labeling bottles of rum in a factory; and children in both the red school uniforms of the Communist regime and in everyday American clothing.

Introductions by Robert A. McCabe and Andrew Szegedy-Maszak, who has published widely on the history of photography, cover such topics as the difficulties facing photographers in Cuba, the differences between popular conceptions of Cuba and its reality, and the poverty, politics, and flux between old and new which mark Havana today. Weekend in Havana is a trilingual edition featuring English, Spanish, and Greek, making the book uniquely accessible.

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Photo-journalism 1855 to the Present

Editor's Choice

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A compelling anthology of photojournalism from the nineteenth century to the present, profiling fifty-four masters of the field and reproducing their most stirring images. 

Ever since Roger Fenton inaugurated the genre by photographing the Crimean War in 1855, the world's great photojournalists have used a variety of approaches to bear witness to their times. At one end of the photojournalistic spectrum are war photographers like Robert Capa and Larry Burrows, who capture the most extreme events of human existence as they happen; at the other are social documentarians like Lewis Hine and Sebastião Salgado, who step back from the single dramatic incident to cover in depth such economic and cultural issues as labor and migration. By compiling 250 of the most memorable images from photojournalism’s 150-year history, Photojournalism 1855 to the Present: Editor’s Choice provides a fascinating introduction to the entire range of the field.

Author Reuel Golden, a noted authority on photojournalism, selected the fifty-four photographers featured in this book based on their critical reputations and historical importance. For each photographer, Golden provides a portfolio of representative images—many reproduced at full-page size—as well as a brief biography and an insightful critical commentary on his or her career. In these commentaries and in his informative introduction, Golden discusses the particular challenges of photojournalism, such as the relationship between photographer and subject, and the moral ramifications of aestheticizing human suffering. Yet perhaps most importantly, his text also encourages the reader to look closer and discover how well the photographs speak for themselves. From Frank Hurley’s groundbreaking World War I battlefield shots to Mary Ellen Mark’s stark portraits of American poverty and James Nachtwey’s haunting pictures of the September 11 attacks, the images in this book prove that even in our era of twenty-four-hour video-on demand, the still photograph remains as powerful as ever.

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India

Journey Through the Heart of a Continent

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A groundbreaking photographic journey, illustrated with 150 captivating images, through the heart of India, illuminating the variety of cultural traditions that constitute modern Indian life.

From 1965 to 2001, Roland and Sabina Michaud traveled throughout India on a series of lengthy expeditions, dedicating over thirty five years to photographing the landscape and people. India: Journey through the Heart of a Continent is their intimate view of this remarkable country, designed to illuminate the country’s complexities and contradictions.

The beauty and mysteries of India’s many competing religions and ways of life provided the inspiration for the 150 carefully selected photographs in this volume, telling the story of a remarkable country caught between old traditions and modern dilemmas. The variety of the photographs is astounding, reflecting the depth of understanding of the photojournalists; the breathtaking images range from India’s austere, mountainous landscapes and diverse architectural tradition to intimate portraits of the men, women and children who inhabit these places. From beachside bonfires and traditional fishing boats to details of intricate stone carvings and sweeping panoramas of the cities’ crowded streets, India: Journey through the Heart of a Continent provides an unparalleled look into the lives of the Indian people and the multifaceted worlds they live in.

India is currently one of the top five destinations in the world and it inspires extreme and passionate responses from its many visitors; while some see it as an enchanted island, the poverty and difficulties of daily life are impossible to ignore. From the Himalayas to the Dravidian lands, India contains the variety of an entire continent. Through their fascinating text and images, Roland and Sabina Michaud have sought to capture the reality of Indian life in this gorgeous, expansive tribute to the real India. This is an ideal gift for armchair travelers as well as for those who have traveled there and wish to relive the beauty and surprise of their journey.

 

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Celestial Realm

The Yellow Mountains of China

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A lavishly produced volume featuring stunning duotone images of China’s fabled Yellow Mountains by the celebrated photographer Wang Wusheng.

 For more than three decades, Wang Wusheng has been captivated by the beauty of Mount Huangshan, also known as the Yellow Mountains. Located in the southern part of the Anhui province in northern China, Mount Huangshan has often been described as the world’s most beautiful and enchanting mountain. Over the centuries this mountain with its seventy-two peaks has been the subject of Chinese landscape painters, whose singular works are so haunting it seems impossible that these mountains exist in nature.

Inspired by the legacy of these paintings, Wang Wusheng has sought to portray this scenic wonder. As shown in the collection of ninety photographs in this extraordinary volume, here are mist-shrouded, granite peaks emerging from an ever-changing veil of clouds, sculptural craggy rocks on lofty cliffs, and weathered, oddly-shaped pine trees, depicted in all seasons and at various times of day. Wang Wusheng’s images are so exceptional that they look like paintings.

Accompanying the photographs are two fascinating essays about the art history and natural history of the Yellow Mountains. Art historian Wu Hung provides an eloquent, comprehensive survey of the region’s artistic, literary, and photographic tradition, relating how Wang Wusheng’s work is an important part of this notable legacy.

In a second essay, Damian Harper presents an authoritative account of the geology, geography, and natural history of this legendary place.

In addition, there is an introduction by the Japanese critic Seigo Matsuoka, who contributes an insightful appraisal of Wang Wusheng’s work.

CONTRIBUTORS

Born in the province of Anhui, Wang Wusheng has been photographing the Yellow Mountains since 1974. He has contributed his work to books published in China, Japan, and Austria, and his photographs have been in collected and widely exhibited by museums and galleries, including the Museum of Chinese Art in Peking. He lives in Tokyo.

Wu Hung was educated in China and earned his Ph.D. at Harvard University, where he was a professor. He is now a professor of Chinese art history at the University of Chicago and the director of the Center for the Art of East Asia. His books, including Three Thousand Years of Chinese Painting, have received a number of important awards.

Damian Harper lives in Shanghai and is the author of numerous books, among them National Geographic Traveler’s China.

Seigo Matsuoka, who lives in Tokyo, teaches at Tezukama University. He was the editor- in-chief of YU magazine and has written many books and articles.

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Ansel Adams

The National Park Service Photographs

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This tiny treasure is a glorious tribute to Ansel Adams and to the vanishing landscape he loved.

In 1941 Ansel Adams was hired by the United States Department of the Interior to photograph America's national parks for a series of murals that would celebrate the country's natural heritage. Because of the escalation of World War II, the project was suspended after less than a year, but not before Adams had produced this group of breathtaking images, which illustrate both his early innovations and the shape of his later, legendary career as America's foremost landscape photographer.

The invitation to photograph the nation's parklands was the perfect assignment for Adams, as it allowed him to express his deepest convictions as artist, conservationist, and citizen. These stunning photographs of the natural geysers and terraces in Yellowstone, the rocks and ravines in the Grand Canyon, the winding rivers and majestic mountains in Glacier and Grand Teton national parks, the mysterious Carlsbad Caverns, the architecture of ancient Indian villages, and many other evocative views of the American West demonstrate the genius of Adams' technical and aesthetic inventiveness.

In these glorious, seminal images we see the inspired reverence for the wilderness that has made Ansel Adams' work an enduring influence on the intertwining spirits of art and environmentalism, both so necessary for the preservation of our natural world.

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Abayudaya

The Jews of Uganda

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Told with captivating images and haunting music, here is the remarkable story of a group of rural African people who converted to Judaism eighty years ago and, despite ensuing hardships, have stuck by their faith.

The 600 members of the Abayudaya (Children of Judah) community living in a remote area of eastern Uganda lead a life devoted to traditional Jewish practices. They observe the Sabbath and holidays, attend services, follow dietary laws, and cling tightly to traditions in their small mud and brick synagogues. Surrounded by Muslims and Christians, facing poverty and isolation, these people have maintained their Jewish way of life for four generations since the initial conversion of their tribal chief Semei Kukungulu in 1917. Even during Idi Amin's reign of terror, when synagogues were closed and prayers had to be held in secret, the Abayudaya did not abandon their beliefs.

Richard Sobol is the first photojournalist to document this newly discovered Jewish community's way of life and to relate their heroic story. His sensitive portraits and moving landscapes depict everyday life. He shows their day of rest on the Jewish Sabbath, as well as their religious celebrations and rituals. His intriguing text chronicles the story of this community from its conception to the present. The book includes a CD filled with powerful music and songs from services recorded by ethnomusicologist Jeffrey A. Summit, who has also provided an essay examining this unique mix of African and Jewish sounds.

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The Russians Emerge

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A brilliant portrayal of Russians in the post-Soviet era--from ordinary people to politicians and rock stars.

Heidi Hollinger, in a photographic tour-de-force, has captured the spirit of the Russian people as they adjust to their new freedoms. Her sympathetic portraits reveal how some "emerging" Russians relish their new opportunities while others, rooted in the past, struggle to survive in their changing world. The wide-ranging collection in this sumptuous volume includes images of workers, entertainers, artists, military officers, religious leaders, cosmonauts, Stalin's great-grandson, and Lenin's niece, among others. Accompanying the portraits is a fascinating text by Jonathan Sanders, who provides insight about the people of modern Russia and Hollinger's importance in documenting them during this intriguing, troubled era.

For nearly a decade, Hollinger has lived in Russia, at first as a visitor and gradually as an insider, gaining access to such high-profile politicians as Mikhail Gorbachev and Vladimir Putin, as well as other top-echelon personalities. At the same time she explored Moscow's lower depths: mounted on in-line skates and armed with mace, she invited typical Russians to her studio to pose for a portrait. Her "working folk" images are in the tradition of pre-Revolutionary masters, who also wandered through the streets in search of representative faces to photograph.

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L'Amour fou

Photography and Surrealism

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A collection of fabulous photographs by the foremost Surrealist artists.

Much has been written about Surrealist painting and sculpture, but most of the erotic, disorienting, and exquisite Surrealist photographs of Man Ray, Marcel Duchamp, Max Ernst, André Breton, Brassaï, Salvador Dalí, André Kertész, and Hans Bellmer have remained all but unknown — until now. Traditional criticism has viewed Surrealist photography as a pale imitation of authentic Surrealist work. The assumption has been that photography, a "realistic" medium, is fundamentally incompatible with a cause devoted to the wildly subjective, the world of dreams, and the unconscious. As a consequence, Surrealist photography, a major body of twentieth-century art, has remained largely unexplored.

L' Amour fou is the first book to study the crucial role photography did in fact play in the Surrealist movement. It shows how photographers enlisted into the service of "subjective" Surrealism their medium's very claim to "objective" reality. Of greatest interest, of course, is the book's abundant reproductions of the fantastic and distorted photographic creations that must be acknowledged as an important part of the Surrealist oeuvre.

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