All books

Life and Culture in Northeast India

By

An abundantly illustrated journey through one of the world’s most diverse and fascinating regions

Although India’s northeastern administrative region makes up only eight percent of India’s land area, it is home to some 140 indigenous tribes, each with its own unique culture. The terrain, predominantly hilly, ranges from snow-capped peaks to tropical rainforests. Now, for the first time, noted authors and filmmakers Dipti Bhalla Verma and Shiv Kunal Verma provide a comprehensive introduction to this little-known yet captivating part of the world. Verma and Verma conduct us from the towering Kanchenjunga massif in Sikkim to the tea plantations of Assam, to the astonishing biodiversity of Arunachal Pradesh, to the martial tribes and Baptist churches of Nagaland, to the birthplace of polo in Manipur, to the living root bridges of Meghalaya, to the farms nestled among the hills of Tripura and Mizoram. They take us into the lives of the many peoples of these eight states, who maintain their traditional customs and beliefs even in the face of growing ecological threats. Featuring more than three hundred color photographs and several detailed maps, Life and Culture in Northeast India will be an essential volume for anyone interested in the peoples and places of Planet Earth.

Read more

New York

Treasures of the Museum of the City of New York (Tiny Folio)

By

A sweeping visual history of the Big Apple―in a miniature package 


This Tiny Folio takes readers on a fascinating tour of New York City history―from the land of the Lenape to today’s metropolis―as illustrated by some 250 diverse items from the incomparable collections of the Museum of the City of New York. These include paintings, photographs, drawings, manuscripts, decorative arts and fashion, and unique artifacts such as a lock of George Washington’s hair, “Boss” Tweed’s tiger-headed cane, and the famous Stettheimer Dollhouse, adorned with miniature works of art by the 1920s avant-garde.

An insightful text places these objects in their historical context and relates them to the broader forces that have shaped New York into a world city. This little book is a perfect gift for first-time visitors and lifelong New Yorkers alike.

Read more

Santorini

Portrait of a Vanished Era

By

Beautiful black-and-white photographs of Santorini taken between 1954 and 1964―depicting idyllic landscapes and traditional island culture


Today Santorini is visited by some 2.5 million people a year. But when Robert McCabe and his brother arrived there in 1954, they were the only visitors on the island. In this collection of stunning photographs from the 1950s and 1960s―reproduced as tritones of surpassing quality―McCabe has recorded the hardscrabble, yet often romantic, life of a vanished era. Picturesque whitewashed houses dug into the volcanic pumice; the harvest of the island’s famous cherry tomatoes; the winding road to the ruins of ancient Thera―all this was captured by his lens..

McCabe’s photographs are complemented by two essays from the noted Greek journalist Margarita Pournara, one poetically evoking her grandmother’s childhood on Santorini and the other explaining the geological forces that have given this volcanic island its dramatic form.

A companion to McCabe’s recent volume on Mykonos, this book will fascinate modern-day visitors to Santorini, as well as those who trace their roots to the Greek islands.

Read more

Mykonos

Portrait of a Vanished Era

By

Experience the unspoiled beauty and traditional culture of this legendary Greek island, as it was in the late 1950s
 
There are hundreds of Greek islands. Why did Mykonos become, in just a few decades, one of the world’s top vacation spots? Part of the answer can be found in these remarkable images, which show the natural beauty and traditional island culture that initially attracted artists, writers, and celebrities like Jackie Kennedy.
 
These photographs, taken in 1955 and 1957—many for National Geographic—re-create a daylong visit to Mykonos in the days before cars, running water, and electricity. We disembark in the Old Harbor and wander the picturesque streets of Chora (the main town), watching the townspeople at their daily tasks. We visit St. Panteleimon Monastery on a festival day, and take a caïque (a traditional wooden boat) to see the ruins on the neighboring island of Delos.
 
Every photograph is reproduced as a full-page tritone of surpassing quality, and accompanied by a detailed caption. This book will fascinate modern-day visitors to Mykonos, as well as those who trace their roots to the Greek islands.

Read more

Chesapeake Country

By

The classic photo book on one of America's most picturesque destinations, revised and updated

The Chesapeake Bay is the nation’s largest estuary, stretching 185 miles from the Susquehanna River to the Virginia capes, touching more than 8,000 miles of shoreline. This country of mists and tranquil waters harbors a rare abundance of wildlife, as well as the last commercial sailing fleet in the United States—the famous skipjacks, or oyster-dredging boats. The bay and its rivers are home to isolated villages that preserve early colonial dialects; to historic plantations, such as Mount Vernon; and to considerable cities, including Washington, D.C., Baltimore, and Richmond.

Beautifully photographed and written, Chesapeake Country tells the story of the bay in all its aspects: its waterscape and wildlife; its delicate ecology; its rich history as the seedbed of American liberty as well as American slavery; and its uncertain present, as the population of watermen who live by crabbing and oystering dwindles, and that of prosperous newcomers seeking a respite from city life grows. This new edition also discusses the future of the bay in the era of climate change and brings us up to date on the places and personalities that make the Chesapeake so unique.

For those who live on the bay, Chesapeake Country is a celebration. For those who do not, it is an invitation to explore. And for everyone, it is a journey of discovery.

Read more

The Grand Cascapedia River Volume 1

A History

By

Volume One of a magnificent two-volume history of the legendary salmon river, replete with tales of remarkable fish—and remarkable personalities

Originating in two rocky torrents in the Shick-Shock Mountains, the Grand Cascapedia River cuts across the forested wilderness of Quebec’s Gaspé Peninsula and empties into Chaleur Bay. Just as exceptional as the river’s natural beauty are the giant salmon that return there each summer to spawn. Known to the local Micmac Indians from time immemorial, these outsize fish have attracted wealthy and well-connected sportsmen—including captains of industry and U.S. presidents—since the mid-nineteenth century. Now, in these exhaustively researched and superbly written volumes, veteran angler Hoagy B. Carmichael reveals the eventful history of this most exclusive salmon river.

The first volume of The Grand Cascapedia River recounts the discovery of the river’s salmon by adventurous outdoorsmen in the 1840s; the assignment of fishing rights on the river to successive Governors General of Canada, as a curious perk of office; and—in a fascinating encounter between the Gilded Age and the northern wilds—the subsequent purchase of those rights by a small group of American millionaires, the “Old Club.”

The second volume begins with the dissolution of the Old Club in the depths of the Great Depression and traces the development of the private camps, each with its own character and lore, that are found along the river today. It also explores the management of the river’s natural resources and the present-day division of fishing rights between the camps, the Micmacs, and the public.

Both volumes are illustrated with hundreds of rare archival photographs, as well as original maps and drawings. The Grand Cascapedia River represents an important contribution not only to the annals of sport, but also to social history and wildlife conservation and management.

Read more

The Grand Cascapedia River Volume 2

A History

By

Volume Two of a magnificent two-volume history of the legendary salmon river, replete with tales of remarkable fish—and remarkable personalities

Originating in two rocky torrents in the Shick-Shock Mountains, the Grand Cascapedia River cuts across the forested wilderness of Quebec’s Gaspé Peninsula and empties into Chaleur Bay. Just as exceptional as the river’s natural beauty are the giant salmon that return there each summer to spawn. Known to the local Micmac Indians from time immemorial, these outsize fish have attracted wealthy and well-connected sportsmen—including captains of industry and U.S. presidents—since the mid-nineteenth century. Now, in these exhaustively researched and superbly written volumes, veteran angler Hoagy B. Carmichael reveals the eventful history of this most exclusive salmon river.

The first volume of The Grand Cascapedia River recounts the discovery of the river’s salmon by adventurous outdoorsmen in the 1840s; the assignment of fishing rights on the river to successive Governors General of Canada, as a curious perk of office; and—in a fascinating encounter between the Gilded Age and the northern wilds—the subsequent purchase of those rights by a small group of American millionaires, the “Old Club.”

The second volume begins with the dissolution of the Old Club in the depths of the Great Depression and traces the development of the private camps, each with its own character and lore, that are found along the river today. It also explores the management of the river’s natural resources and the present-day division of fishing rights between the camps, the Micmacs, and the public.

Both volumes are illustrated with hundreds of rare archival photographs, as well as original maps and drawings. The Grand Cascapedia River represents an important contribution not only to the annals of sport, but also to social history and wildlife conservation and management.

Read more

Southern Light

Images from Antarctica

By

A beautifully printed photographic journey, in both color and black-and-white, through the awe-inspiring landscapes of the frozen continent.

Between 1990 and 2009, veteran wilderness photographer David Neilson made six journeys to Antarctica and the subantarctic, in a quest to capture the exquisite light of these southernmost lands. This oversized volume presents the spectacular results of his efforts; its 130 color and 100 duotone plates portray the dramatic topography of the Antarctic Peninsula; the icebound expanses of East Antarctica; the Ross Sea region, which witnessed the heroic age of Antarctic exploration; and the subantarctic islands of South Georgia and Macquarie, with their profusion of wildlife.

Many of the landscape photographs were taken with a large-format view camera for maximum detail and tonal subtlety, and several are reproduced as panoramic gatefolds, showing the true vastness of this great southern realm. The images of wildlife, many of them remarkable close-ups, include emperor, king, Adélie, gentoo, chinstrap, royal, and macaroni penguins; wandering, royal, and grey-headed albatross; and crabeater and fur seals. Accompanying the photographs are a narrative of Neilson’s Antarctic journeys, essays on conservation and climate change, and five full-page maps.

Southern Light is an excellent gift for anyone who has visited Antarctica personally, as well as for those who prefer to admire its frozen beauty from a more temperate clime.

Distributed for Snowgum Press

Read more

Humanitas III

The People of Burma

By

The third brilliant volume in the Humanitas series captures the vibrant lives of the Burmese people.

Following the success of Humanitas and Humanitas II: The People of Gujarat, photographer Fredric Roberts now turns his lens to the captivating and controversial country of Burma. The result of eight years of travel throughout the region, the approximately 120 photographs in Humanitas III focus on the spiritually rich lives of the Burmese people. Featuring temples, portraits, scenes of everyday life, and incredible landscape, Humanitas III offers a rare view of a country that has been closed to —or avoided by— many photographers due to its social isolation and reputation for political repression.

Cicero coined the termhumanitas (literally, “human nature”) to describe the development of human virtue in all its forms, denoting fortitude, judgment, prudence, eloquence, and even love of honor—which contrasts with our contemporary connotation of humanity (understanding, benevolence, compassion, mercy). The Latin term is certainly a fitting book title as we are struck with respect and awe for Roberts’s subjects’ individual fortitude and eloquence rather than pity for their plight: each photograph tells us a compelling story.

Curated by Britt Salvesen, the department head and curator of the photography department at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, many of the images present subjects looking directly at the photographer and at the reader, effortlessly prompting a cross-cultural dialogue. Essays by Teri Edelstein and Emma Larkin, an expert journalist/author covering Burma, provide context for Roberts’s photographs by describing the lives of the Burmese peoples. about the photographer and authors

Read more

Turkish Art and Architecture

From the Seljuks to the Ottomans

By

This vibrantly illustrated volume chronicles nearly a millennium of Islamic art in Turkey.

The Anatolian peninsula, one of the oldest seats of civilization, has been ruled by a succession of great powers, including the Romans and their successors in the East, the Byzantines. Its Islamic era began in 1071, when the Seljuk Turks, nomads from Central Asia who had already taken control of Persia, defeated the Byzantine army at Manzikert and moved west, creating a new sultanate in Anatolia. The Seljuks were eventually succeeded in this region by the Ottoman Turks, who crossed the Bosphorus to conquer an exhausted Constantinople in 1453, and went on to extend their power far beyond the borders of modern Turkey, establishing an empire that endured until the early twentieth century.

Ruling over a land that had always been at the crossroads of east and west, these Islamic dynasties developed a cosmopolitan art and architecture. As art historian Giovanni Curatola demonstrates in this insightful new book, they combined elements of the prestigious Persian style and memories of their nomadic past with local Mediterranean traditions, and also adopted local building materials, such as stone and wood. Curatola introduces us first to the new types of buildings introduced by the Seljuks—like the caravansary and the türbe, or mausoleum—and then to the sophisticated architectural achievements of the Ottomans, which culminated in the great domed mosques constructed by the master builder Mimar Sinan (d. 1588). He also traces the history of the decorative arts in Turkey, which included lavishly ornamented carpets, manuscripts, armor, and ceramics.

Illustrated with some 250 attractive and well-chosen color photographs, Turkish Art and Architecture is fascinating reading for anyone with an interest in Turkey, and an essential reference for any student of Islamic art and architecture.

Read more

China

A Photographic Journey through the Middle Kingdom

By

A spectacular photographic tour of China's natural scenery and architectural landmarks, now available in a charming miniature edition.

This little volume takes us on a visual journey through the greatest splendors of China’s varied geography and the chief monuments of its 5,000-year-old civilization. Its 243 color photographs, which include 12 panoramic gatefolds, show us the country’s most famous landmarks—like the Forbidden City and the Great Wall—as we have never seen them before, and and introduce us to less familiar but just as fascinating sights, like the the multicolored travertine lakes of Huanglong Valley and the beautiful calligraphic inscriptions on the rugged rocks of Mount Taishan. Extended captions at the back of the book provide a concise introduction to the history and significance of each of the forty-four locales depicted, twenty-eight of which have been designated as World Heritage sites by UNESCO.

Read more

The Weeping Goldsmith

Discoveries in the Secret Land of Myanmar

By

A distinguished Curator and Research Scientist at the Smithsonian Institution, W. John Kress, recounts his natural history exploration over the course of nine years in the wild lands of Myanmar in search of rare, beautiful, and scientifically unknown plants.

In the great tradition of Darwin’s Voyage of the Beagle, this book is a first-person narrative of daunting travel and scientific discovery in the little-known country of Myanmar. Dr. Kress explored many areas in this enigmatic country, surveying its teak forests, bamboo thickets, timber plantations, rivers, and mangroves to document its incredible botanical diversity. Myanmar is one of the great biodiversity “hot spots” in Asia, but because of its social isolation and reputation for political repression it has been closed to—or avoided by—many scientists. Nevertheless, Dr. Kress was determined to search for and record plants that had not been studied since they were first discovered by Western botanists over a century ago. Among the rarities he came upon was a new species of plant called “the weeping goldsmith,” a ginger flower whose Burmese name was derived from the legend that the local goldsmiths were reduced to tears because none of their own creations could rival its exquisiteness.

Dr. Kress also relates how he came to appreciate the people and culture of Myanmar through an understanding of their flora, natural habitats, and human-dominated environments. Included are fascinating excerpts from his field journals that serve as counterpoints to the accounts of earlier plant explorers. Illustrating the text are some 200 of Dr. Kress’s own color photographs of the incredible plants, people, landscapes, and temples he witnessed in his travels as well as 30 archival images of Burma taken by past explorers. The back matter features an illustrated portfolio of representative native plants.

This lively armchair exploration should appeal to a general readership as well as to botanists, conservationists, and environmentalists.

Read more

India Exposed

The Subcontinent A-Z

By

An insightful look at modern Slumdog Millionaire India, a country of stunning contrasts where the past meets the future.

Author-photographer Clive Limpkin traveled extensively throughout India to capture this vast and populous nation. The photographic legacy of his journeys is impressively far-reaching, both in geographic scope and subject. His thematic photographic approach is complemented by thoughtful essays on various subjects. From “Army" and "Astrology" to "Yoga" and "Zebu," India Exposed examines natural life, culture, and regions in India. Limpkin’s photographs and essays invite his reader to learn about the issues and trends facing India today.

The Indian subcontinent is a vastly diverse, naturally vibrant, and culturally rich region of the world. India is also a country of stark contrasts. After the annual dry season, heavy monsoon rains return the Indus River valley to a lush green. India is both ahead of and behind the “development” curve: at the forefront of high-tech modernization on the one hand and struggling with overpopulation, hunger, and poverty on the other. India is a pluralistic society that is both multiethnic and multilingual. Though influenced by Western technology, in many ways India still clings to its unique past.

From overcrowded cities to luscious wildlife reserves, India comes alive in 200 impressive and colorful pictures.

Read more

Daughters of India

Art and Identity

By

A fascinating exploration of a land whose artwork is as varied and beautiful as its people.

Although one in every six women in the world lives in India, most of the Western world knows little about them. Daughters of India is a collection of the stories of twenty Indian women, each of whom uses creative expression as a means of empowerment. With 250 full-color illustrations, author Stephen Huyler introduces the reader to these individual Indian women and their art—and draws us into their colorful lives and inspiring achievements.

Huyler seeks to dispel Western myths about the repression of Indian women, instead revealing their incredible strength and determination to improve their lives and those of their children. The varied and inspiring women’s stories are simultaneously unique and unifying. From a woman preparing for her son’s wedding to a leading female IT entrepreneur, and from Hindu to Christian to Muslim, the many female faces of India come alive to Huyler’s audience.

A portion of the proceeds from this book will benefit the Global Fund for Women, the Self-Employed Women’s Association, and Folk Arts Rajasthan, as well as other organizations that work to empower women, a full list of which appears in the back of this book.

Read more

Travels with Van Gogh and the Impressionists

Discovering the Connections

By

A captivating memoir of the author’s journey through France in search of the Impressionists and their art, interwoven with personal histories of the artists and illuminated with contemporary photographs that re-create and reimagine their work.

In 2000, deeply shaken by her husband’s recent death, author and world traveler Lin Arison took a trip through France with her granddaughter Sarah. Though Arison was in mourning, and Sarah was initially skeptical about art, the two surprised themselves by discovering renewed joy in the work of the Impressionists and the settings that inspired them.

In the years that followed, Arison’s personal odyssey became an extraordinary collaboration with photographer Neil Folberg, a collaboration culminating in Travels with Van Gogh and the Impressionists: Discovering the Connections. In one unique volume, Arison ushers readers from Auvers to Arles, Giverny to Mont Sainte- Victoire, in her quest to rediscover the lives, dwellings, and paintings of the Impressionists. En route, she debunks long-held myths about Van Gogh and Berthe Morisot, befriends twenty-first-century descendants of some of the masters, and finds inspiration in the Impressionists’ mutually supportive relationships. Gracefully blending memoir, travelogue, art history, and biography, Arison’s intimate narrative brings new insight to our understanding of these artists and their legacy.

Interspersed with Arison’s text, and with handsome reproductions of the original masterpieces, Neil Folberg’s photographs capture the central spirit of the Impressionists’ work and reapply that spirit to contemporary subjects and settings. Following an intuitive sensibility that never misses its mark, Folberg deploys each artist’s individual vision to new and striking ends, undergoing an artistic transformation of his own in the process.

Together, Arison’s words and Folberg’s images explore the enduring impact of France’s great late nineteenth-century painters, and the ways in which their revolutionary visions of their own world still impart great meaning and beauty to ours.

Read more

Weekend in Havana

An American Photographer in the Forbidden City

By

An insightful exploration of the people of Havana and their daily activities, as seen through the lens of the American photographer Robert A. McCabe.

Both Cuba and the United States have strict rules governing photographic activity in Cuba. The U.S. carefully delineates what kinds of photographic undertakings are forbidden, while Cuba has, in the past, imprisoned photographers for giving a “distorted image of Cuban reality.” Nevertheless, photographer Robert A. McCabe managed to satisfy the many regulations, and spent four eventful days in Havana, taking pictures of a people rarely seen by the rest of the world.

Weekend in Havana celebrates Havana’s citizens in a compilation of moving and thought-provoking photographs, 97 in total and all in full color. From images of buildings which combine classical influences with splashes of vibrant color to intimate portraits of the people, the book’s presentation of Havana is fresh and realistic. The reader will meet a range of closely observed personalities, such as a policeman patrolling in a shabby police car, an expression of boredom and frustration flitting across his face; women young and old labeling bottles of rum in a factory; and children in both the red school uniforms of the Communist regime and in everyday American clothing.

Introductions by Robert A. McCabe and Andrew Szegedy-Maszak, who has published widely on the history of photography, cover such topics as the difficulties facing photographers in Cuba, the differences between popular conceptions of Cuba and its reality, and the poverty, politics, and flux between old and new which mark Havana today. Weekend in Havana is a trilingual edition featuring English, Spanish, and Greek, making the book uniquely accessible.

Read more

Bicycling

Along the World's Most Exceptional Routes

By

This exceptional guide presents twenty-five great bicycling vacations around the world for riders of all abilities, on routes selected for their unique locations, dramatic scenery, varying terrain, and fascinating wildlife.

In this new guide, excursions range from an easy ride through the Loire Valley in France, with stops along the way to taste local wines, to a more challenging trail through Tibet into Nepal. Among the other destinations is a route into northwest Ireland, which winds through an unspoiled landscape of lakes and rivers, and a trip beginning in Tallinn, Estonia—where you'll have time to explore the city’s historic streets and squares before heading out into the countryside—and ending in St. Petersburg, Russia.

Included in this book is a holiday to suit everyone’s interest and ability. The trips last between seven and fourteen days and are easy to organize yourself. Alternatively, the author provides information about specialist travel companies who will make all the reservations for you. You can opt to travel with a group or ride independently at your own pace, following a set of detailed notes and maps. Ground operators are on hand along the way to service your bike and make any repairs needed. Whether you prefer the countryside with long, winding downhill runs or being dropped off on a mountaintop to admire the view before riding down through the terrain, this book will help you discover an extraordinary outdoors vacation.

Read more

Ansel Adams

The National Park Service Photographs

By

This tiny treasure is a glorious tribute to Ansel Adams and to the vanishing landscape he loved.

In 1941 Ansel Adams was hired by the United States Department of the Interior to photograph America's national parks for a series of murals that would celebrate the country's natural heritage. Because of the escalation of World War II, the project was suspended after less than a year, but not before Adams had produced this group of breathtaking images, which illustrate both his early innovations and the shape of his later, legendary career as America's foremost landscape photographer.

The invitation to photograph the nation's parklands was the perfect assignment for Adams, as it allowed him to express his deepest convictions as artist, conservationist, and citizen. These stunning photographs of the natural geysers and terraces in Yellowstone, the rocks and ravines in the Grand Canyon, the winding rivers and majestic mountains in Glacier and Grand Teton national parks, the mysterious Carlsbad Caverns, the architecture of ancient Indian villages, and many other evocative views of the American West demonstrate the genius of Adams' technical and aesthetic inventiveness.

In these glorious, seminal images we see the inspired reverence for the wilderness that has made Ansel Adams' work an enduring influence on the intertwining spirits of art and environmentalism, both so necessary for the preservation of our natural world.

Read more